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ePub Circling Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality download

by Wendy Reed,Mitzi Adams,Marilou Awiakta,Amy Blackmarr,Marshall Chapman,Beth Ann Fennelly,Connie May Fowler,Margaret Gibson,Rheta Grimsley Johnson,Mary Karr,Barbara Robinette Moss,Brenda Marie Osbey,Valerie Reiss,Stella Suberman,Barbara Brown Taylor,Alice Walker,Cia White,Jennifer Horne

ePub Circling Faith: Southern Women on Spirituality download
Author:
Wendy Reed,Mitzi Adams,Marilou Awiakta,Amy Blackmarr,Marshall Chapman,Beth Ann Fennelly,Connie May Fowler,Margaret Gibson,Rheta Grimsley Johnson,Mary Karr,Barbara Robinette Moss,Brenda Marie Osbey,Valerie Reiss,Stella Suberman,Barbara Brown Taylor,Alice Walker,Cia White,Jennifer Horne
ISBN13:
978-0817317676
ISBN:
0817317678
Language:
Publisher:
University Alabama Press; First edition (April 2, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1345 kb
Fb2 file:
1832 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc lit mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
868

Circling Faith is a vital, welcome, eclectic, and ecumenical collection, and an important addition to contemporary works exploring spirituality

Circling Faith is a vital, welcome, eclectic, and ecumenical collection, and an important addition to contemporary works exploring spirituality. To students of southern culture, women’s studies, and contemporary American divinity and religious studies, this book will prove to be a valuable resource. Melissa J. Delbridge, author of Family Bible.

Circling Faith is a collection of essays by southern women that encom. Magic by Amy Blackmarr depicts a religious practice that occurs wholly outside of any formal setting-she recognizes places, such as a fishing shack in south Georgia, and things, such as crystal Cherokee earrings, as reminders that God exists everywhere and that a Great Comforter is always present. It should be here on Monday so I'll be enjoying it next week.

Barbara Ann "Bobbie" (Hackmann) Taylor (September 12, 1943 – c. December 6, 1967), also known as the "Tent Girl", was notable as an unidentified homicide victim for nearly 30 years after her body was found on May 17, 1968 near Ge. . December 6, 1967), also known as the "Tent Girl", was notable as an unidentified homicide victim for nearly 30 years after her body was found on May 17, 1968 near Georgetown, Kentucky. She was referred to as "Tent Girl" because of material wrapped around her. On April 23, 1998, the Scott County Sheriff's Office announced that this victim had been identified

Circling Faith is a collection of essays by southern women that encompasses spirituality and . Wendy Reed; Jennifer Horne; Mitzi Adams.

Circling Faith is a collection of essays by southern women that encompasses spirituality and the experience of winding through the religiously charged environment of the American South. Mary Karr, in Facing Altars, describes how the consolation she found in poetry directed her to a similar solace in prayer.

Circling Faith: Southern Women On Spirituality. Wendy Reed, Wendy Reed, Jennifer Horne, Jennifer Horne, Mitzi Adams, Marilou Awiakta, Amy Blackmarr, Marshall Chapman, Susan Cushman, Beth Ann Fennelly, Connie May Fowler, Margaret Gibson, Rheta Grimsley Johnson, Mary Karr, Debra Moffitt, Barbara Robinette Moss, Brenda Marie Osbey, Valerie Reiss, Stella Suberman, Barbara Brown Taylor, Alice Walker, Cia White. Circling Faith is a collection of essays by southern women that encompasses spirituality and the experience of winding through the religiously charged environment of the American South.

Circling Faith" is a collection of essays by southern women on spirituality.

Город: Nashville, TNПодписчиков: 62 ты. себе: 'Mary Robinette' like 'Mary Anne.

Circling Faith is a collection of essays by southern women that encompasses spirituality and the experience of winding through the religiously charged environment. Circling Faith" is a collection of essays by southern women that encompasses spirituality and the experience of winding through the religiously charged environment of the American South.

Circling Faith is a collection of essays by southern women that encompasses spirituality and the experience of winding through the religiously charged environment of the American South. Mary Karr, in “Facing Altars,” describes how the consolation she found in poetry directed her to a similar solace in prayer. In “Chiaroscuro: Shimmer and Shadow,” Susan Cushman recounts how her dissatisfaction with a Presbyterian upbringing led her to hold her own worship services at home and eventually to join the Eastern Orthodox Church. “Magic” by Amy Blackmarr depicts a religious practice that occurs wholly outside of any formal setting—she recognizes places, such as a fishing shack in south Georgia, and things, such as crystal Cherokee earrings, as reminders that God exists everywhere and that a Great Comforter is always present. In “The Only Jews in Town,” Stella Suberman gives her account of growing up as a religious minority in Tennessee, connecting her story to a larger narrative of Eastern European Jews who moved away from the Northeast, often to found and run “Jew stores” in midwestern and southern towns.  Alice Walker, in an interview with Valerie Reiss titled “Alice Walker Calls God ‘Mama,’” relates her dynamic relationship with her God, which includes meditation and yoga, and explains how she views the role of faith in her work, including her novel The Color Purple.  These essays showcase the large spectrum of spirituality that abides in the South, as well as the equally large spectrum of individual women who hold these faiths.  
  • This book of essays on finding God and exploring faith is excellent. Yes, if you are from the south, some of it may resonate more deeply but really, it's a book for everyone. Loved it.

  • Have two friends who have essays published in this work.

  • With its subdued colors and pretty design, its polite white background, the cover of this book masks the reality within. The voices here are not muted, not always polite. They belie the image of all Southern belief as rigid, humorless, literal. These writers thump no pulpit, shout no automatic Amen to tradition. Sixteen essays and one interview (with Alice Walker), all fresh and forceful, so well crafted and full that I often forgot I was reading with a dual purpose--to say something useful to potential readers as well as to read for my own pleasure and education. Oh, the education!

    I learned, for one thing, that sometimes denial makes good rhetoric, as it does in Brenda Marie Osbey's essay "Why We Can't Talk to You About Voodoo." Repeatedly she says that she cannot talk about her beliefs, but she does, and her message is that talking to those outside her ancestral faith fails because we, the outsiders, want access to myth, mystery and exotic ritual, not necessarily the truth. She's right. I did not want to see her deny the importance of Marie LaVeau, New Orleans Voodoo queen, still revered by many 130 years after her death. I've visited her grave in St. Louis Cemetery #1, seen a young man stand at the vault playing his guitar. Osbey admits no such person to her pantheon: "I can tell you that there are no queens, priests, or priestesses in Voodoo." The dolls are "a gimmick borrowed from European witchcraft to cheat the . . . tourists" (75).

    The book makes the point that there are many religions, many ways of being spiritual, and that no one religion opposes any other. Any one of us, Southern or not, may safely leave the path of tradition and received wisdom. Reed and Horne have gathered first-person stories about women who left the vanilla Protestant religions long associated with Southern culture and turned to Eastern Orthodox practice, to Atheism, to Baptist-Buddhism. They include Jews and Native Americans.

    Given the history of patriarchal religions, the banishment of women from the altar, the veils and separation, the imposed female subservience, I wish the Cataloging-in-Publication did not sequester, as it does, these writers in a feminist cloister. Sisterhood is good, but wisdom spread abroad is better. This book goes beyond feminism and faith right into the heart of acceptance and understanding.

  • I'm biased because a dear friend, Susan Cushman, has an essay in this book. Other writers whose work I enjoy - Rheta Grimsley Johnson, Mary Karr, Beth Ann Fennelly - have essays in it, too.

    All that being said, though, this is a great collection. Religion is extremely prevelant in the south and the take on it - agnostic, Protestant, Jewish, Orthodox - in this book is fascinating and compelling.

  • A thoughtful and thought-provoking book on the power and insight of spirituality in its many forms. This book was a very enjoyable read that made me think about my own ideas of spirituality.