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ePub A New Name: Grace and Healing for Anorexia download

by Emma Scrivener

ePub A New Name: Grace and Healing for Anorexia download
Author:
Emma Scrivener
ISBN13:
978-1844745869
ISBN:
1844745864
Language:
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian (September 1, 2017)
Category:
Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1230 kb
Fb2 file:
1881 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf mbr doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
280

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The book deals with Anorexia and OCD in detail and is a great help to anyone going through this trauma, also for parents and loved ones on the sidelines. The text is easy to read (font not too small) the book arrived very clean. I have already passed it on to a friend. Verified purchase: Yes Condition: New. Best-selling in Non Fiction. See all. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Best-selling in Non Fiction.

Emma Scrivener was born in Belfast, but now lives with her husband and daughter in the southeast of England. She is the author of several books, including A New Name: Grace and Healing for Anorexia. Only His Wounds Can Heal Us. Emma Scrivener Feb 1, 2019.

I have always felt hungry," says Emma Scrivener. Harrowing, heart-breaking, human, and humourous, this book will grip you from start to finish. Not just for food, but for everything: from money to recognition. I'm a human chasm, a vortex of insatiable longing.

A testimony of how grace breaks through Emma Scrivener's battle with . I have always felt hungry, says Emma Scrivener

A testimony of how grace breaks through Emma Scrivener's battle with anorexia. I have always felt hungry, says Emma Scrivener. Harrowing, heart-breaking, human and humorous, this book will grip you from start to finish. Wonder with Emma as God's grace breaks through and reshapes her heart and thinking, redeeming that which had seemed lost.

Discussing life, identity, food, body, gender and how the good news of Jesus changes everything. October 10 at 6:37 AM ·. For world mental health day. October 9 at 11:22 PM ·.

Emma helped me understand the disease more, and the hope of the gospel. Rosner offers a convincing hermeneutic for understanding Paul’s approach to the Law in the excellent New Studies in Biblical Theology series

Emma helped me understand the disease more, and the hope of the gospel. Best contrarian book Susan Yoshikara & Douglas Sylva (Ed., Population Decline and the Remaking of Great Power Politics. Packed full of amazing facts, figures and projections, this series of essays argues that rather than too many people being a global problem, it is population decline in the key world powers that should be worrying us more. Rosner offers a convincing hermeneutic for understanding Paul’s approach to the Law in the excellent New Studies in Biblical Theology series. If nothing else, reading someone with a different take on Paul from NT Wright is to be recommended!)

My healing began when I met Jesus, the Lord who is more beautiful than anorexia

Anorexia looked like a way of negotiating the world and making it safe. In reality, it almost killed me-twice. The first time, I was a teenager and professionals forced me to eat. I put on weight, but though I looked better on the outside, on the inside I felt the same. My healing began when I met Jesus, the Lord who is more beautiful than anorexia. Whatever we face, he’s the Lamb who understands and the Lion who overcomes. Emma Scrivener was born in Belfast. She now lives in Eastbourne with her husband, Glen, and their daughter.

I have always felt hungry,’ says Emma Scrivener.

The face of anorexia is not a glossy model in a perfume ad. It's a starving animal, circling the empty cupboards, blank-eyed and vacant. It's a face frozen in a rictus grin, mouthing lies. Everything is under control. I have always felt hungry,’ says Emma Scrivener. I’m a human chasm, a vortex of insatiable longing

  • So thankful for Emma's vulnerability & bravery in sharing her story. Her voice and her story are captivating (I read her book in one evening!) She skillfully and transparently captures the complexity of an eating disorder - the familial, cultural, experiential, spiritual, and personal factors that all have a part in the development of anorexia. She humbly takes responsibility for her self-destructive behavior, while also showing grace for all the ways she was hurt by individuals and bruised by the darkness of life. Unlike many stories of anorexia, Emma's story is one of HOPE and redemption. She beautifully shares her faith in Christ, but does so in a personal and gentle way that is readable for those who don't share her faith. As a fellow struggler with anorexic behaviors, I highly recommend Emma's book!

  • I cried pretty much the whole way through. I read it in one sitting. I cried my own tears and Emma's too I think. If you have an eating disorder this is a must read. It will give you language and language enables you to process what is happening to you, inside you and around you as you wrestle with this. Thank you Emma - it was not just a step on my journey to wholeness - it was like 7 steps. It is a resource I will revisit as I endeavour to put my own story onto paper. Freedom doesn't seem such a hopeless word to me now.

  • Good real life story about al the problems involving anorexia, not just an eating disorder, so much emotional components you would not think of.

  • I'm struggling to know what to say in this review. I read this book in one sitting. In places I felt there was too much detail but the honesty of the author was also one of the things that makes the book worth reading. It is difficult to understand where the shame that the author experienced in childhood originated from but the terrible result was anorexia which nearly claimed the life of the author several times. The confusion and chaos that result in a mind overtaken by this illness and the way it effects relationships is summed up in this paragraph later in the book

    "You're scared and angry and sad. You want to let people in, but you don't know how. With one hand, you're pushing them away; with another you're pulling them in. You're caught between loneliness and fear; frightened of what they'll see, but also of being alone."

    I felt very sad to read this and can only imagine how the author's husband felt as he struggled to know how best to help his ailing wife. As with all sinful addictions/obsessions, the author found Jesus to be the only true solution and road to recovery.