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ePub James K. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny (Biographies in American Foreign Policy) download

by Thomas M. Leonard

ePub James K. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny (Biographies in American Foreign Policy) download
Author:
Thomas M. Leonard
ISBN13:
978-0842026468
ISBN:
0842026460
Language:
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (November 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1727 kb
Fb2 file:
1709 kb
Other formats:
mbr txt rtf azw
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
261

James K. Polk: A Clear a. .has been added to your Cart. Thomas M. Leonard provides handy summaries of each expansionist movement and a concise critical assessment of Polk's tactics and policies in accomplishing his programs.

James K. Students of American expansionism, sectionalism, and presidential politics will all benefit from this examination. Kinley Brauer, University of Minnesota). An excellent blend of political biography of Polk and topical discussion of the major expansionist issues of his presidency. A detailed chronology and an excellent bibliographic essay make this study highly useful for classroom purposes.

Thomas Leonard's study, the sixth volume in a biographical foreign policy series, is the most recent effort. Polk was similarly successful on the Oregon question. The series intends to offer brief studies (ca. 200 pages) focusing on the diplomatic efforts of prominent individuals. Leonard views him as a political manipulator who formulated his own principles and policies, while encouraging Congress (at the same time) to determine its own agendas. He accordingly led-and misled-Congress, his cabinet, and the British to believe that his position on the Northwest boundary ranged anywhere from the 49º to 54º 40'.

This book analyzes Polk's political career and his role in each of these territorial expansions. James K. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny shows that they were far more complex than the moral crusade that had been labeled 'Manifest Destiny

This book analyzes Polk's political career and his role in each of these territorial expansions. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny shows that they were far more complex than the moral crusade that had been labeled 'Manifest Destiny. Southern planters wanted to protect their 'peculiar institution' of slavery by adding new territories from which slave states would be carved. Commercial interests feared that war with England over any of these territories would adversely impact upon the nation's trade. Although the Oregon boundary dispute was settled.

The "clear and unquestionable destiny" turns out to be a Manifest one, as the book is largely .

The "clear and unquestionable destiny" turns out to be a Manifest one, as the book is largely devoted to detailing Polk's plans for expansion. As this volume is part of the "Biographies in American Foreign Policy" Series, this is understandable. The book opens straightforwardly and sensibly with Polk's inauguration and a quick description of the main character: frontier-born, hardworking, a populist in the spirit of Jackson. I felt like he was able to flesh out all the perspectives more so than if it was just a boring timeline. Polk : A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny. Part of the Biographies in American Foreign Policy Series). by Thomas M. Leonard. Polk's four years in office marked the greatest period of territorial acquisition in the history of the USA. This is an analysis of each of these expansions, showing that they were far more complex than the moral crusade that had been labelled Manifest Destiny. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny. Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 2001. Pp. xxiv, 218. Illustrations, maps. This sixth entry in a series examining American foreign policy through biographical treatments of major figures is a concise study of James K. Polk's efforts to expand U. S. territory to the Pacific Coast.

com: James K. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny (Biographies in American Foreign Policy) (9780842026475): Thomas M. Leonard: Books. com: James K.

A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny (Biographies in American Foreign Policy).

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove James K. Polk from your list? James K. Polk. A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny (Biographies in American Foreign Policy). Published November 28, 2000 by SR Books. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny shows that they were far more complex than the moral crusade that had been labeled ‘Manifest Destiny. Southern planters wanted to protect their ‘peculiar institution’ of slavery by adding new territories from which slave states would be carved. Commercial interests feared that war with England over any of these territories would adversely impact upon the nation’s trade.

When he was elected President in 1845, James K. Polk was only 49 years old-at that time the youngest president ever to be elected. He faced a conflicted nation on the verge of tremendous territorial expansion.

James K. Polk's four years in office marked the greatest period of territorial acquisition in the history of the country-what New York journalist John O'Sullivan termed as the 'Manifest Destiny' of the United States to expand across the continent. By the end of Polk's presidency in 1849, U.S. possessions included the California, Oregon, and New Mexico territories. In addition, Texas had become part of the Union.

This book analyzes Polk's political career and his role in each of these territorial expansions. James K. Polk: A Clear and Unquestionable Destiny shows that they were far more complex than the moral crusade that had been labeled 'Manifest Destiny.' Southern planters wanted to protect their 'peculiar institution' of slavery by adding new territories from which slave states would be carved. Commercial interests feared that war with England over any of these territories would adversely impact upon the nation's trade. Although the Oregon boundary dispute was settled with little friction, the Mexican War erupted after the annexation of Texas.

This fascinating biography of our eleventh president and his successful efforts for expansion of U.S. territory will be of interest to students studying United States history, foreign policy, and the massive territorial expansion in the 1840s known as Manifest Destiny.

  • I am currently reading a bio of every President in order. I generally look for a fairly comprehensive one volume account but unfortunately for Polk there are none available (although the forthcoming 400+ page plus bio by Borneman will hopefully change this). I decided I would save my money to wait for Borneman's book and checked out Leonard's short bio (196 pages of text) from the Library.

    Thankfully, this is a great short bio of James K. Polk. His early life is covered in a suprising amount of detail for the short amount of text devoted to it, and his Presidency is covered quite thoroughly. This is accomplished by Leonard's great writing and superb organization and editing. This book was so satisfactory I am not sure I will even decide to read Borneman's forthcoming biography. Also, do not be swayed by Betty Burke's review, she is clearly reviewing the wrong book.

  • This book was not written by a fan or supporter of this Tennessee president, but released by a Yankee group who hides behind "Oxford" so we might think Mississippi or England. Not so, William Dusinberre must be fuddies with the university professors who tore apart Nathan Bedford Forrest in the same way. Overlooked completely he status and the part these Tennesseans played in the history of this nation. It's best to consider character assassination with the conflicting thins these writers emphasize while leaving out the real story, the facts of the matter. James K. Polk had been Governor of Tehhessee and Speaker of the House of Representatives before becoming U. S. president. It was not a secret that he owned slaves to work on his cotton plantation in Mississippi. We didn't have such in Tennessee, but I have an old post card of the 11th President's bust which stands in the State Capitol in Nashville. We visited Polk's ancestral home in downtown Columbia, Tennessee. It was not out in the country, though a famous one is in that county owned by a female physician. She did not have slaves. Forrest's family were fine, upstanding natives of Chapel Hill, not so far east from Columbia. It infuriates me when I innocently find weird subverted stuff like thos on the public library shelves. I wish the reference librarians who ordered these fiction pretending to be non-fiction before putting them out for just anybody to read. Polk was duly elected and in the White House from 1845 to 1849, before the Civil War. He was not responsible for that war.

    This person from Cape Town used the false writings of professor Wayne Cutler when he came to this Republican town, and thought that what he was reading was truth. Polk was a Southern Democrat. What would he write about Huey B. Long, George Wallace, and other governors who stood tall for what the South stands for. The politics of slavery did not have any substance whatsoever in the war which divided this country. It was states' rights -- the Southern states, which Northerners would not understand. I learned more than I had planned that there is a conspiracy going on to deride Southern leaders and presidents. They were statesmen and war heroes and lived to be a part of the history of America. Modern history-writing is all wrong, when the author makes up "facts" as he is inclined, and not factually.