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by George Sayer

ePub Jack: A Life of C. S. Lewis download
Author:
George Sayer
ISBN13:
978-0891077619
ISBN:
0891077618
Language:
Publisher:
Crossway Books; 1st edition (January 1994)
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Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1215 kb
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1426 kb
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4.5
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550

Over the next twenty-nine years, author George Sayer's first impression about C. S. Lewis proved true. He was interesting; but he was more than just that

Over the next twenty-nine years, author George Sayer's first impression about C. He was interesting; but he was more than just that. He was a devout Christian, gifted literary scholar, best-selling author, and brilliant apologist. Sayer draws from a variety of sources, including his close friendship with Lewis and the million-word diary of Lewis's brother, to paint a portrait of the man whose friends knew him as Jack.

Jack: A Life of C. Lewis. Most popularly known as the author of the children's classic The Chronicles of Narnia, C. ― Rabindranath Tagore. Astral projection, ritual magic, and alchemy : Golden Dawn material by . 96 MB·28,723 Downloads·New! Anyone who is studying the Golden Dawn system needs this volume to complete their collection.

George Sayer describes the life of Clive Staples Lewis-"Jack" to those close to hi. The book's twenty-two chapters are roughly chronological.

George Sayer describes the life of Clive Staples Lewis-"Jack" to those close to him. He draws information from documented sources, his experiences with Lewis as a student, and from frequent visits and correspondence exchanged throughout the rest of Lewis's life. Beginning with its subject's unhappy childhood, overshadowed by the death of his mother, the book describes his equally unpleasant public school years and then follows the timeline of his adult life.

In his biography Jack: A Life of C. Lewis, he wrote . Later Sayer changed his mind Lewis spoke well of Mrs. Moore throughout his life, saying to his friend George Sayer, "She was generous and taught me to be generous, to. In December. Lewis, he wrote: Were they lovers? Owen Barfield, who knew Jack well in the 1920s, once said that he thought the likelihood was "fifty-fifty". Later Sayer changed his mind. Lewis spoke well of Mrs. In December 1917, Lewis wrote in a letter to his childhood friend Arthur Greeves that Jane and Greeves were "the two people who matter most to me in the world".

I continue, after about 18 months of reading about one book a month on or by CS Lewis, to be continually impressed by him. Part of what continues to impress me about Lewis is his humanity in the context of his greatness. Lewis was certainly fallible and this biography by a former student and long term friend acknowledges the fallibility. By George Sayer, Foreword by Lyle W. Dorsett. Sayer and Lewis maintained a long friendship. As I walked away from New Buildings, I found the man that Lewis had called "Tollers" sitting on one of the stone steps in front of the arcade. How did you get on?" he asked. Author: GEORGE SAYER (1914–2005) was head of the English department at Malvern College in Worcestershire until his retirement in 1974.

Over the next twenty-nine years, author George Sayer's first impression about C. Sayer draws from a variety of sources, including his close friendship with Lewis and the million-word diary of Lewis's brother, to paint a portrait of the man whose friends knew as Jack.

George Sayer, author of "Jack: A Life of . After he had written a good deal of the book, he got the idea of the lion Aslan, who came bounding into it. Jack had been having a good many dreams of lions about. Lewis," takes us back a few years to the life and times of the Chronicles of Narnia creator. Jack had been having a good many dreams of lions about that time. once he was there he pulled the whole story together, and soon he pulled the other six stories in after him. The story was largely finished by the end of the Christmas vacation in 1948. Two months later, Jack read it to Tolkien. Jack had always been constructively helpful and sympathetic with Tolkien’s writing, and he probably expected similar treatment.

Sayer offers glimpses into Lewis' extraordinary relationships and experiences, including his life at the Kilns, marriage . Title: Jack: A Life of . Lewis By: George Sayer Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 480 Vendor: Crossway Publication Date: 2005.

Sayer offers glimpses into Lewis' extraordinary relationships and experiences, including his life at the Kilns, marriage to Joy Davidman Gresham and the creative processes of this world-renouned writer. Lewis (9781581347395) by George Sayer. Dimensions: . 0 X . 0 (inches) Weight: 1 pound 3 ounces ISBN: 1581347391 ISBN-13: 9781581347395 Stock No: WW47392. Beyond the Shadowlands: . Lewis on Heaven & Hell.

Offering glimpses into Lewis's extraordinary relationships and experiences, Jack details the great scholar's life at the Kilns; days at Magdalen College; meetings with the Inklings . Books related to Jack: A Life of C. C. Lewis - A Life.

Offering glimpses into Lewis's extraordinary relationships and experiences, Jack details the great scholar's life at the Kilns; days at Magdalen College; meetings with the Inklings; marriage to Joy Davidman Gresham; and the creative process that produced such world-famous works as the classic Chronicles of Narnia, Mere Christianity, and The Screwtape Letters.

This warm and personal insider's look at the life of C.S. Lewis, gifted literary scholar and bestselling author--and one of this century's most influential Christian apologists--also includes Sayer's reviews of recent developments in C.S. Lewis studies and answers to questions the author is asked when he lectures.
  • George Sayer describes the life of Clive Staples Lewis--"Jack" to those close to him. He draws information from documented sources, his experiences with Lewis as a student, and from frequent visits and correspondence exchanged throughout the rest of Lewis's life. Beginning with its subject's unhappy childhood, overshadowed by the death of his mother, the book describes his equally unpleasant public school years and then follows the timeline of his adult life.

    The book's twenty-two chapters are roughly chronological. Each deals with a time or location important to Lewis's life, a writing project, or a close relationship. The writing chapters are the most interesting, revealing discussions, readings and insights that influenced Lewis's work. We learn, for example, of his crafting The Chronicles of Narnia stories as "pre-Christian" instructional tools for children to help them more easily recognize moral concepts as adults. These chapters summarize Lewis's thinking by excerpting from his writing without creating the impression that the reader no longer needs the original work. Skillfully done!

    In the relationship chapters the author dispels misconceptions about three people in his subject's life. The first is his brother Warren who, as Lewis's secretary, was intimately involved with his business and correspondence. Warren's alcoholism strained their relationship, but did not cause the estrangement other biographers have suggested. The book explains Lewis's relationship to Mrs. Janie Moore, in whose household he lived for many years. Mrs. Moore was the mother of Lewis's close friend, Paddy Moore. After Paddy was killed in WWI, Lewis fulfilled his promise to look after his friend's mother. In some ways she assumed the role of Lewis's own absent mother.

    There is also description of Lewis's relationship with his wife, Joy Davidman. The author dismisses its portrayal in the movie Shadowlands as inaccurate. His own account is based on observation and conversations with both Joy and Lewis. It captures the couple's progression from tentative correspondents to close and happy partners. The relationship chapters are written in the same abstract, summary style as the writing chapters. But it is less effective here; the few anecdotes whet the readers appetite, but leave it unsatisfied. Their effect is one of distance from Lewis, rather than of increased intimacy. This is unfortunate.

    This book is recommended as a summary of Lewis's character traits and ideas. It is worth reading. It should be accompanied or followed by Mere Christianity,Surprised by Joy, and other works by Lewis himself.

  • Understanding the great C. S. Lewis may not be possible no matter how many biographies are written. As J. R. R. Tolkien said to the author of this book back in 1934, "Interesting? Yes, he's certainly that.... You'll never get to the bottom of him" (xvii). But this biography by George Sayer at least comes close to capturing the heart of who Jack is, and perhaps does so better than any other attempt. Sayer was not only a student of Lewis who saw the man at work both as a tutor and a lecturer, he was a personal friend who had access to Jack's home life and even private thoughts. Sayer goes beyond presenting Lewis the public figure, or even the private man, as he perceived him; instead, Sayer digs deep, using letters and interviews and facts to gather knowledge beyond what he gained during the course of their friendship. He also strives to capture the essence of each location that influenced Lewis, describing the history and politics and local nuances, so that the reader sees how Lewis affected and was affected by his culture. Although this biography is a clear presentation of facts, managing to resist any creative elaboration for the sake of story, it rivets the readers' attention with just the right amount of detail to bring to life this beloved author, lecturer, radio personality, brother, novelist, lover, poet, son, friend, and lay theologian. Besides, Jack's great mind, his faithfulness to loved ones, his passion for literature, his sexuality, his love for animals and nature, his humor, his romance, his devotion to God, and his penchant for skinny dipping keep us intrigued without any need for elaboration.

  • I read George Sayer's biography of Lewis immediately after reading Lewis' autobiography, Surprised by Joy. Lewis' own account of his life was interesting, but unbalanced, as Sayer argues. In Sayer, the reader finds a sympathetic interpreter of Lewis' life, but one who also avoids merely laudatory remarks on Lewis. For example, Lewis is quite hard upon his father in Surprised by Joy, but Sayer mitigates Lewis' portrait with key anecdotes and examples of Lewis' father's concern, love, and generosity to Lewis. He does this while also doing justice to the real flaws in Lewis' father.

    One area in which Sayer may be unbalanced himself is in his treatment of Lewis' brother Warren Lewis. He is at pains to correct what he believes is Warren's flawed view of Mrs. Moore and of Joy, Lewis' two chief female companions during his life. While many speculate upon the true nature of Lewis' relationship to Mrs. Moore, Sayer believes it to have been free of any sexual or even sensual qualities--Mrs. Moore was to Lewis the mother he lacked during the traumatic experiences of his youth to which he speaks so much of in his autobiography, according to Sayer. Lewis' relationship to Joy prior to and during their legal marriage is also a point of emphasis with Sayer. He argues that Lewis preserved chastity until after he and Joy's "Christian" marriage ceremony, at which point Lewis had developed a real marital affection for Joy, as opposed to the empathetic feelings that led him to rescue her from the disastrous marriage in which she was stuck in the U.S.A., where she did not believe her two boys were safe from harm. Given Lewis' own childhood experiences, it is not difficult to see that he would be willing to take unusual measures to protect children whom he believed were subject to abuse. Much of Sayer's arguments stem from his desire to correct other biographer's "misunderstandings" of Lewis based upon Warren Lewis' letters. One can also see how Sayer's closeness to Lewis influences his view of Warren's irresponsibilities resulting from his alcoholism and his diffidence to help out with domestic affairs at the Kilns. He does attempt to balance out his portrait of Warren by acknowledging Warren's immense help in answering Lewis' fan letters, and in recognizing Warren's prodigious knowledge of Nepoleonic France (including praises for the quality of Warren's writing).

    Sayer also does a fine job of demonstrating Lewis' propensity to keep his private affairs hidden from even his closest friends. Most of Lewis' academic friends were oblivious to his relationship with Arthur Greeves, Lewis' closest childhood friend next to Warren, and his most intimate confidant during his intense spiritual struggles prior to, or rather during his long process of conversion to Christianity.

    All in all Sayer's biography is top-notch and a pleasure to read. He captures the finer points of Lewis, of which Lewis himself was candid in his autobiography, while also presenting lots of details and insights, which Lewis either declined to include or was unlikely (or, indeed, unable) to identify and express.