mostraligabue
» » The Big Fellow: Michael Collins the Irish Revolution

ePub The Big Fellow: Michael Collins the Irish Revolution download

by Frank O'Connor

ePub The Big Fellow: Michael Collins  the Irish Revolution download
Author:
Frank O'Connor
ISBN13:
978-0312182939
ISBN:
0312182937
Language:
Publisher:
Picador USA (March 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1207 kb
Fb2 file:
1747 kb
Other formats:
docx txt azw lrf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
517

Frank O’Connor (born Michael Francis O'Connor O'Donovan) was an Irish author of over 150 works, who was best known for his short stories and memoirs.

Frank O’Connor (born Michael Francis O'Connor O'Donovan) was an Irish author of over 150 works, who was best known for his short stories and memoirs. Raised an only child in Cork, Ireland, to Minnie O'Connor and Michael O'Donovan, his early life was marked by his father's alcoholism, indebtness and ill-treatment of his mother.

Frank O'Connor was a much loved writer in Ireland, 60 or so years ago. His biography of Michael Collins was . His biography of Michael Collins was first published in 1937 and is necessarily rather dated. Written for an Irish, and one suspects an Irish American, audience that lived through those times, The Big Fellow is rather vague on the political history and presumes a lot of the reader's own knowledge of events.

Frank O'Connor (1903-66) grew up in Cork city and fought in the Irish War of Independence and in the Civil War on the anti-Treaty side. The Frank O'Connor short story festival has been run in his home town since 2000. He was the author of 150 works and is best known for his short story collections and memoirs. He also worked as a teacher, lecturer and translator. His story 'Guests of the Nation' was the inspiration for Neil Jordan's film 'The Crying Game'.

The Big Fellow is a 1937 biography of the famed Irish leader, Michael Collins, by Frank O'Connor. The Big Fellow covers the period of Collins's life from the Easter Rising in 1916 to his death during the Irish Civil War in 1922. Unlike most conventional biographies of famous leaders, O'Connor establishes a clear goal in portraying Collins's character and human qualities above his major achievements

Frank O'Connor's book is excellent and an entrancing introduction to Michael Collins.

Frank O'Connor's book is excellent and an entrancing introduction to Michael Collins. It is fascinating and readable and, therefore, recommended for a first book about Collins. Of course, anything written by O'Connor is of the highest quality.

O'Connor, Frank (1965). The Big Fellow: Michael Collins and the Irish Revolution. a b Examining Irish leader's youthful past - from the BBC. ^ British Postal Service Appointment Books, 1737-1969 about Michael J Collins. King's College London's list of notable alumni. Clonmore & Reynolds. O'Donoghue, Florence (1954).

From The Big Fellow: Michael Collins and the Irish Revolution -- Frank O’Connor was once stopped on the road west of Kinsale by a man who said to him: ‘I hear you’re a famous writer. I’d like to be a famous writer too, but ’tis bloody hard.

From The Big Fellow: Michael Collins and the Irish Revolution. From My Father’s Son – A Case of Hypnotism. - Frank O’Connor was once stopped on the road west of Kinsale by a man who said to him: ‘I hear you’re a famous writer. The comma and the apostrophe are easy enough, but the semicolon is the very divil.

The Big Fellow:: Michael Collins and the Irish Revolution. FRANK O’CONNOR WAS OFTEN ACCUSED of being iconoclastic – of being in a perpetual state of annoyance with the Catholic Church. It was even written that ‘the sight of the collar was enough to make his hair stand on end’. It is true that he had little time for the institutional Church’s pedantic and legalistic moralising, and even less for its Byzantine secrecy and triumphalist and authoritarian voice.

Liam Neeson has said that he found the book of great assistance when preparing for the role of Collins in the 1996 film directed by Neil Jordan.

Read The Big Fellow, by Frank O'Connor online on Bookmate – Re-issued with an introduction by Neil Jordan, 'The Big Fellow' is the 1937 biography of the famed Irish leader Michael Collins by acclai. It is an uncompromising but humane study of Collins, whose stature and genius O’Connor recognised. Liam Neeson has said that he found the book of great assistance when preparing for the role of Collins in the 1996 film directed by Neil Jordan.

The Big Fellow, based on Frank O'Connor's writings, captures the life and times of the wildest boy of them all, Michael Collins, as he graduates from masterminding the most dare-devil raids, prison breaks and escapades of the War of Independence, to commanding the official army of . .

The Big Fellow, based on Frank O'Connor's writings, captures the life and times of the wildest boy of them all, Michael Collins, as he graduates from masterminding the most dare-devil raids, prison breaks and escapades of the War of Independence, to commanding the official army of a newly-formed st.

A probing and poetic narrative chronicles the life of the Irish revolutionary leader from his return from voluntary exile until his untimely death at the age of thirty-one
  • A great biography of Collins written not long after his death. O'Conner didn't initially agree with Collins and the Treaty during the Irish Civil War but became fascinated by the man later. Contains many interesting anecdotes which you'll enjoy if you aren't too worried about proving where they came from since there are very few footnotes. Allegedly Neil Jordan read this book before writing the script to the movie Michael Collins starring Liam Neeson. There are scenes in the book which are almost exactly performed on screen in the film. Pick up this book if you want a non-academic, fun and interesting view of Collins.

  • This book came out in 1937. Many of the references to places, events, and people may have been clear to readers in Ireland in the1920's, but they are not now. The author had a political view of events leading up to the Irish Civil War in the '20's which represents the thinking of that time. A more current book would put those events in a different perspective and would be easier to follow.

  • As usual it is getting boring writing the same review for stuff I received from Amazon. The book was exactly as promised, thanks.

  • Frank O'Connor was a much loved writer in Ireland, 60 or so years ago. His biography of Michael Collins was first published in 1937 and is necessarily rather dated. It is a warm and affectionate portrait of the great champion of Irish independence who achieved so much in the struggle against the British, but was to die tragically at the hands of his own countrymen in the Civil War. Intriguingly, O'Connor opposed the establishment of the Irish Free State, the compromise that Collins campaigned for and was interred by Collins' government during bitter the Civil War that followed.

    The story of Ireland's struggle for freedom and especially the events of 1916 - 1923 is complicated, overlain by deep emotion over the bitter internal struggles which shaped partition and the Treaty granting Dominion status to the south. Written for an Irish, and one suspects an Irish American, audience that lived through those times, The Big Fellow is rather vague on the political history and presumes a lot of the reader's own knowledge of events. As a portrait of Michael Collins the big hearted champion, boisterous figure of fun and revolutionary organiser extraordinaire, it is a delightful and fulfilling read which shows its subject warts and all. Indeed for the second edition O'Connor rewrote his account of one of the most controversial aspects of Collins' last months, his part in planning the assassination of Britain's leading soldier, describing it as inexplicable and dishonest to both the English Cabinet and his own. Collins in O'Connor's hands is a conflicted yet compelling character who continues to fascinate students of Irish history and contemporary European politics alike. What better legacy could subject and writer have?

  • This Collins biography was the first one I ever read. I bought it immediately after viewing Neil Jordan's biopic in 1996 and tore through it cover-to-cover in no time flat. Part of that was from youthful enthusiasm and the rest because O'Connor's writing style is so engaging. O'Connor himself deemed the book a "labour of love" and it is clear from the very first page that he meant it. My paperback edition has a foreword from the author in which he explains his affinity to Collins and his motivations for writing the biography. From there, he divides the text into three parts: Lilliput in London, The Body and the Lash, and The Tragic Dilemma. He covers Collins' youth, though his focus begins during Collins' teen years in London. He discusses the Easter Rising, Collins' jail time, his work at infiltrating the British spy system, Bloody Sunday, Collins' assassination, and, very briefly, the aftermath in Ireland. Throughout the book, O'Connor gives his reader a voyeuristic peek into Collins' life through Collins' own words and Collins' personality traits. This is one of the best Collins biographies at allowing the audience to know Michael the person as opposed to Michael the soldier, Michael the revolutionary, or Michael the politician. Also what sets O'Connor apart is his creative writing background. His words are infused with a kind of passion to which many writers can only aspire. I have to admit the last three paragraphs of the book may have you in tears as I was the first time I read them. If you are new to the life of Collins, this is not a bad selection to begin with and, likewise, if you are already familiar with Collins, this is an excellent book to include in your collection.

  • I was interested in learning more about Collins after seeing the recent movie. This book fleshed out the charaterizations in the movie giving a realistic treatment of the man. In doing so it tended to diminish the legend as it was portrayed in the Liam Neeson movie. Well that was sort of a letdown for my overly romantic vision of a man who truly is an Irish hero, but I am glad to have been educated on the matter by a man who knew and admired Michael Collins for who he really was. The book was written quite a while ago when this was all current information which lends credibility to every page. The style of writing is not at all modern so occasionaly a sentence or two requires some consideration to get the meaning. Having said that I found it a very interesting book with a lot to offer any student of Irish History or Politics. Other books cover history in greater detail and offer more commentary but this one is a first hand account by a veteran of the actual events described. It is very even handed in its treatment of Collins and other major characters. I was left with a huge respect for Collins and his passion for the people of Ireland. I really reccomend this book and have already passed it on to another person to read.