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ePub State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III download

by Bob Woodward

ePub State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III download
Author:
Bob Woodward
ISBN13:
978-0743272247
ISBN:
0743272242
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (September 3, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1537 kb
Fb2 file:
1488 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr lrf rtf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
138

State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III (. ISBN 0-7432-7223-4) is a book by Bob Woodward, originally due to be published October 2, 2006 (but unexpectedly released two days early by the publisher due to demand), that examines how the George W. Bush a. .

State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III (. Bush administration managed the Iraq War after the 2003 invasion. It follows Woodward's previous books on the Bush administration, Bush at War and Plan of Attack.

Woodward wrote 4 books on the Bush Presidency and this is Book 3. It is a damning assessment of the invasion of Iraq and the inability of the President and his most senior staff to be able to work out a way to stabilise the country and leave gracefully. On almost every page, there is information on infighting amongst the senior leaders and mistakes being made in Iraq that are leading to injuries and death. It would appear from. It is a damning assessment of the invasion of Iraq . Woodward had several targets in this book. The first one is George W. Bush, who is characterized as being satisfied with the direction of foreign affairs and plays the role of cheerleader.

Woodward, Bob. Publication date. Bush, George W (George Walker) 1946-, Iraq War, 2003-, National security, Bush, George W. Irakkrieg. New York Simon & Schuster.

State of Denial examines how the Bush administration avoided telling the truth about Iraq to the public, to.I had to get this book on the Bush Administration

State of Denial examines how the Bush administration avoided telling the truth about Iraq to the public, to Congress, and often to themselves. I had to get this book on the Bush Administration. I must confess not having read the previous two parts of "Bush at War" but I couldn't resist Part III. Reading this book was like getting a report on the administration.

State of Denial examines how the Bush administration avoided telling the truth about Iraq to the public, to Congress, and often to themselves. Two days after the May report, the Pentagon told Congress, in a report required by law, that the 'appeal and motivation for continued violent action will begin to wane in early 2007. In this detailed inside story of a war-torn White House, Bob Woodward reveals how White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card, with the indirect support of other high officials, tried for 18 months to get Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld replaced

In his unmissable new book Bob Woodward takes the reader on an inside journey from the start of the Iraq War in.

In his unmissable new book Bob Woodward takes the reader on an inside journey from the start of the Iraq War in 2003 right up to the present day, providing .

Journalist Bob Woodward's new book, State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III, is a follow-up to his previous books on the Bush administration. In the new book, Woodward says that the Bush administration has avoided telling the truth about the Iraq war to the public, to Congress, and to itself. GOP's Double Whammy: Woodward, and Foley Oct. 3, 2006. Woodward's Tone Changes in New Bush Chronicle Oct. 2, 2006.

Bob Woodward's new book draws from hundreds of interviews with key administration figures, their de.

Compare this Product. The Price of Politics. Bob Woodward's new book draws from hundreds of interviews with key administration figures, their de.Compare this Product.

Bob Woodward's third # 1 New York Times bestseller on President George W. Bush's wars tells the detailed, behind-the-scenes story of how the Bush administration failed to tell the truth about the Iraq War.
  • Bob Woodward's books are exceptionally good at providing a highly readable account of White House events and in this book, we see another example of his fine work.

    Woodward wrote 4 books on the Bush Presidency and this is Book 3. It is a damning assessment of the invasion of Iraq and the inability of the President and his most senior staff to be able to work out a way to stabilise the country and leave gracefully.

    On almost every page, there is information on infighting amongst the senior leaders and mistakes being made in Iraq that are leading to injuries and death.

    It would appear from reading this book that the White House was lost in what to do with Iraq, it was just such a massive undertaking to replace Saddam Hussein with a new democratic government that took into account the various religions and needs of the people.

    To me, Woodward's books are the best political books I have ever read.

  • State of Denial, Bush at War, Part III is the hardest-hitting in the series. Woodward, apparently feeling he used up his access to the Administration (but he regained access later after the Surge proved to be effective), let's loose with his indictment of President Bush.

    Woodward had several targets in this book. The first one is George W. Bush, who is characterized as being satisfied with the direction of foreign affairs and plays the role of cheerleader. Throughout the book I grew more anxious about whether anybody can truly communicate with Bush. One would hope the president listens to advisors, experts in different matters, as nobody knows everything and we all rely on others in this way. There just didn't seem to be evidence that Bush listens to others, although we can't know without being able to observe Bush in person.

    The second target is Donald Rumsfeld. Rumsfeld seems to be very smart, self-confident and hard-working. He also is clearly a micromanager. Micromanaging the Pentagon is an impossible thing to do. It's too large and diverse. What went lacking is focused management of the war. This was extremely unfair to the volunteer troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. I kept wishing if only the late Colonel David Hackworth could be put into the mix of war leaders. Hackworth was famous for being a great warrior, leader and having utmost concern for the fighting troops.

    There are several third echelon targets. An interesting one is Condoleezza Rice. Rice also worked hard as did Rumsfeld. The work ethic and the brains were there. But being George Bush's friend was apparently more important to Rice than playing the role of National Security Advisor, leaving the country with nobody identifiable to give unpopular advice to the president. I felt the tragedy here yet we have to acknowledge that many countries have a nepotism system that precludes the kind of checks and balances that we used to take for granted. I felt that Rice could have been working in her capacity for a country with a dictatorship. Still, I have to allow the possibly that the greater tragedy put me in this frame of mind.

    It occurred to me that Woodward has quite a staff. I can't imagine one man producing this set of books all by himself. There is simply too much research for one journalist to do solo. I'm glad also to live in a country where critical expressions such as this are possible.

  • How quickly history moves sometimes. As I write this review, George W. Bush has been out of office just past one hundred days. Already, the war in Iraq is quickly fading from the front pages. The arguments have gone from whether or not to withdraw troops to whether or not to prosecute some of the people involved in the conduct of "the war on terror."

    Like Bob Woodward's former books on Bush and the war, this makes excellent reading. It is as free from bias as anyone could write in the circumstances. Everyone has a different take on what went right and what went wrong regarding Iraq. How readers see this book will be greatly influenced by the viewpoint they bring to the table.

    That said, unless you are firmly set far to one side or the other of the subject, this book will surprise you. If you expect it to "bash Bush," it does not. Nor does it excuse him. Bush comes across as ill prepared for the job of leading. He bowed to the judgment of others and then made the mistake of defending the direction they took him. Admittedly, you won't find many "good guys" in this story and unless you have been a student of the war, you may not recognize the names of those cast in the most favorable light. Those with well-publicized names do not come off very well. In fact, people are so familiar with the names of those players that I am going to dispense with their first names.

    Rumsfeld and the officers who served as Chairmen of the Joint Chiefs during the Bush administration come across as misleading the President, obstructing any efforts to change the direction Rumsfeld took the Pentagon, and failing to admit mistakes made. Chaney appears as a mysterious figure who wielded great power until late in Bush's second term. He seemed to lose that grip on things when "Scooter" Libby, his second in command, was indicted in the CIA leak case. Others in the administration - Rove and Wolfowitz for example - had their own agendas which Bush and Chaney often followed without anyone acting as a check on their influence.

    Rice and Powell are special cases that come across with both high marks and serious negatives. Powell and his close associate Richard Armitage are credited with having a clearer vision of world affairs than other advisors to the President. Unfortunately, their advice was too often ignored or overruled. In the case of Powell, he acquiesced too easily in decisions that he sincerely doubted.

    Anyone questioning the intelligence of the people who make it into the top echelons in our government is making a mistake. However, Rice's knowledge and skill stand out. She understood the workings of the government and the roles she played better than most. She was a loyal lieutenant to the President and during his first term was both an access point and conduit by which to reach the President. As National Security Advisor to the President, she wielded considerable additional power. In fact, she was such a key player that it spread her energies pretty thin while also threatening to compromise her role of palace guard. This changed after she became Secretary of State and she served the country well in that role despite whatever baggage she may have been carrying from Bush's first term.

    Two other players are mentioned throughout the book but their influence on the President is unclear. The former President, George H. W. Bush, deliberately avoided having undue influence or conflict with his son. He was a loyal supporter as a father, but not an advisor. The second person is Prince Bandar bin Sultan, longtime Saudi Arabian ambassador to the United States and a longtime friend of the Bush family. He advised George W. Bush during the campaign for his first term. Both then and throughout the two terms of the second Bush administration, Bandar provided the President insight into the Arab world, as well as Saudi policy.

    There are a multitude of other players from the Administration, the Pentagon, Iraq, Congress, and from outside of government. Woodward is adept at trying to keep the players straight. He fails only occasionally as the story shifts between locations, times, and centers of power. Overall, this is an excellent journalistic effort. When released, it was good reading on current events. Now, it is still that but is rapidly becoming good history as well. It is, of course, only a beginning of that history. New revelations about the Bush administration and the Iraq war are surfacing at an ever increasing rate. One wonders if Woodward will write a Part IV of his series. Undoubtedly, many others will write their own versions.