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by Julia Collins

ePub My Father's War download
Author:
Julia Collins
ISBN13:
978-1568582603
ISBN:
1568582609
Language:
Publisher:
Four Walls Eight Windows (May 29, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Leaders & Notable People
ePub file:
1332 kb
Fb2 file:
1371 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt mbr lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
458

My Father's War book.

My Father's War book. Drawing on her recollections and a suitcase of her father's old letters and photographs, Julia Collins pieces together his experience during the Jerry Collins was emotionally scarred by "the good war" and failed to live up to the standards set for the men of his era. He found unlikely solace: Collins began confiding in his daughter about the war before she turned five.

Jerry Collins was emotionally scarred by "the good war" and failed to live up to the standards set for the men of his era.

Collins talked about her book, My Father’s War: A Memoir, published by Four Walls Eight Windows. She recited excerpts from her book that detailed her surroundings and experiences as a child growing up on a farm in Brandford, Connecticut

Collins talked about her book, My Father’s War: A Memoir, published by Four Walls Eight Windows. She recited excerpts from her book that detailed her surroundings and experiences as a child growing up on a farm in Brandford, Connecticut.

Military Engineering. My Father's War. Paperback. By (author) Julia Collins

Military Engineering. By (author) Julia Collins. Jerry Collins was emotionally scarred by "the good war" and failed to live up to the standards set for the men of his era. Drawing on her recollections and a suitcase of her father's old letters and photographs, Julia Collins pieces together his experience during the war, his return home, and his subsequent descent ? offering a new perspective on the men of "the greatest generation. Photographs are included in this candid recollection.

My Father's War: A Memoir. The climax of the book is the discovery of a packet of wartime letters, written before her father had seen the worst of the war, and the realization that he had returned home deeply affected. A remarkable piece of detective work, conducted under emotionally stressful circumstances, this story is an example of how a man's invisible war injuries can ravage other family members in profound ways. Franks writes in an admirably clear and candid style and displays a comprehensive knowledge of WWII.

My Father's War Korva Coleman talks with author Julia Collins about her new memoir, My Father's War. Collins's father returned from World War II only to fail at work and family life. He could only unburden his terrible war memories with his young daughter when he mistakenly thought she was sleeping. June 16, 200212:00 AM ET. Heard on All Things Considered. Korva Coleman talks with author Julia Collins about her new memoir, My Father's War.

My Father's Place was a music venue in Roslyn, New York. It first opened in 1971, and in the words of The New York Times, created a scene that would influence music for decades to come. In the nearly sixteen years the club was open before it closed in 1987, My Father’s Place presented more than 6,000 shows from over 3,000 diverse artists. Its owner Michael Eppy" Epstein refused to book cover bands, and so the club became known as a place aspiring artists could perform.

My Father's Secret War: A Memoir by Lucinda Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free. My Father's War by Julia Collins.

Jerry Collins was emotionally scarred by “the good war” and failed to live up to the standards set for the men of his era. He found unlikely solace: Collins began confiding in his daughter about the war before she turned five. Drawing on her recollections and a suitcase of her father’s old letters and photographs, Julia Collins pieces together his experience during the war, his return home, and his subsequent descent — offering a new perspective on the men of “the greatest generation.” Photographs are included in this candid recollection.
  • Some years ago, during an annual pilgrimage to Branford, CT to pay my respects to a lost loved-one, I noticed a gravestone adorned with shell offerings in St. Agnes Cemetery. Knowing of my Branford connection, an old friend recommended this book, which reveals that these shells were left by the author, Julia Mary Collins, at the grave of her father, Jeremiah Collins.
    The author evokes the deep roots of her family in Branford, a coastal New England town that was in the autumn of its economic prime, yet still suffused with the natural beauties of sea and shore, and sustained by family trees and traditions. Despite a childhood tempered by the Great Depression and fading family fortunes, Jeremiah Collins nonetheless believed in a brighter future and a share of the American Dream.
    His aspirations, along with his innocence and idealism, perished in the fiery crucible of the battle for the Pacific Island of Okinawa, in which over 250,000 soldiers and civilians perished. Cast adrift with his altered worldview and survivor's guilt in his unchanged hometown of Branford, Corporal Collins existed in a tenuous state of suspension between the still living and the dead.
    The author, who became her father's confidante, perceptively and movingly captures his physical anguish and psychic pain, as well as its lasting impact on her family. Her book serves as a deeply human counterweight to the sea of books that celebrate the triumphs of WWII, but assiduously avoid the incalculable costs for "the greatest generation."
    Julia Collins writes "let me bring back my dad, the way he was when I was seven, just before I began to lose him for good." She has not only resurrected her father, she has delivered the eloquent eulogy he deserves, and has gently and lovingly laid him and his anguish to rest, finally at peace in the earth of his native Branford.
    The sunbleached shells she leaves at her father's grave, washed ashore from the Atlantic ocean of Jeremiah Collins's childhood, but resonant with the Pacific ocean where he fought his greatest battles, bear silent witness to her enduring love.

  • This book is a testament to the uniqueness and isolation of each "ordinary" American family. The author perfectly captures the claustrophobia of a dysfunctional family. The whole family seems trapped in a childlike powerlessness to change their destinies or control events;you forgive the children, you have difficulty forgiving the parents. World War II seems a small thing in comparison to the larger war on Collins Drive.

  • Julia,
    Before anything else, I must thank you for writing this book.
    There is a certain all-American, old-fashioned, no-nonsense style in your writing that rings true of the entire (pre-)war generation, and which most people nowadays have lost. My grandfather had it, and I imagine you, just like him, in a typical scenario, telling family members at a restaurant table a WWII story - and finding every table around straining to listen to your quiet, steady voice as the tale draws in everyone within earshot. I greatly enjoyed finding this quality again, in your writing.
    I am amazedd at the incredible harmony you struck in telling two stories simultaneously, yours and your father's (punctuated by song quotations).
    _My Father's War_ reminds me of Ursula K. LeGuin's _The Dispossed_, which also alternates between near past and more distant past until the two paths finish in the present.
    Thank you. Writing this book was a brave and very good thing to do.
    David

  • Without 20:20 hindsight or wishful thinking, Julia Collins has written a graceful and moving work that stares straight into the failings of her father as a war hero, breadwinner and parent and somehow manages to elevate and dignify the person her dad was. This challenge made all the more difficult by requiring Jerry Collins to pose for a portrait that in life, he would never have held. “My Father’s War” is not the retelling of one ex-Marine’s pointless miseries but wisdom collected from the perspective of the point-blank battles that raged on the homefront long after the formal surrender of any proclaimed American enemy.

  • Collins' moving memoir of her battle-scarred father offers readers a window into the lives of vets after the fighting is over, and the battles that emerged on the homefront. It's as much a story of the author's father, Jeremiah Collins--Yale student-turned soldier-turned salesman, as it is the writer's own. With painstaking honesty and powerful imagery, Collins paints a portrait of small town America in the grips of post-World War II boosterism. Some of the pictures aren't pretty, but Collins, a gifted writer, manages to move the reader through those passages and take them to a place of solace and closure.

  • Each one of us who has been spared the disgusting and brutal realities of war owe it to ourselves to read this daughter's account of her father's journey from smart, optimistic, and ambitious youth to haunted father of five. If we can witness this story, of one man who spiraled perilously downward in a post-war era when everyone else seemed to be spiraling upward, with an open heart, we might just take one step closer to understanding and supporting those in our own lives who suffered through war or any of the other isolating brutalities of life - poverty, disease, hunger, abuse - that we so often find it easier to sweep under the rug.

  • Collins' moving memoir of her battle-scarred father offers readers a window into the lives of vets after the fighting is over, and the battles that emerged on the homefront. It's as much a story of the author's father, Jeremiah Collins--Yale student-turned soldier-turned salesman, as it is the writer's own. With painstaking honesty and powerful imagery, Collins paints a portrait of small town America in the grips of post-World War II boosterism. Some of the pictures aren't pretty, but Collins, a gifted writer, manages to move the reader through those passages and take them to a place of solace and closure.

  • a must read for any intelligent life form! its an amazing story and i highly recomment it to anyone with insight.