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ePub Too sad to sing: A memoir with postcards download

by Kenneth S Brecher

ePub Too sad to sing: A memoir with postcards download
Author:
Kenneth S Brecher
ISBN13:
978-0151904938
ISBN:
0151904936
Language:
Publisher:
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich; 1st edition (1988)
Category:
Subcategory:
Memoirs
ePub file:
1429 kb
Fb2 file:
1621 kb
Other formats:
doc rtf azw mbr
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
393

Brecher, Kenneth S. Publication date.

Brecher, Kenneth S. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on December 7, 2011.

Too Sad to Sing book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir with Postcards as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Using his lifelong enthusiasm for postcards as a frame, Brecher, director of. .

Using his lifelong enthusiasm for postcards as a frame, Brecher, director of the Children's Museum in Boston, has produced a brief, gentle, charmingly idiosyncratic memoir that sets the reader thinking, smiling, and reminiscing as the pages turn. The story of the postcard that provided the title for his book is a good example of what is most endearing here.

I think I see a trend in Kenneth S. Brecher's ''Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir with Postcards'' (Harcourt Brace . Postcards are even better than letters, because they only run to 50 words

I think I see a trend in Kenneth S. Brecher's ''Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir with Postcards'' (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). Also, the epistolary novel seems to be reviving, probably because it spares the writer the tedium of transitions, dialogue and interaction. Postcards are even better than letters, because they only run to 50 words. While we all know how letters can go on, the postcard is the last refinement of minimalism

by Kenneth S. Brecher. The Hocking River stretches 95 miles south eastward from Columbus to the Ohio River, draining an area of 1,200 square miles

by Kenneth S. The Hocking River stretches 95 miles south eastward from Columbus to the Ohio River, draining an area of 1,200 square miles. In this detailed study of the archeological investigations in the Hocking Valley, James L. Murphy summarizes and re-evaluates explorations in the light of current knowledge

Items related to Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir With Postcards. His has been a varied and interesting life, but his book's hopscotch style and blatant superficiality are as irritating as the whining tone that permeates the whole regardless of the adventure or exciting incident being recalled.

Items related to Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir With Postcards. Kenneth Brecher Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir With Postcards. ISBN 13: 9780156904650. Too Sad to Sing: A Memoir With Postcards. In some cases, the reader is left wondering about the resolution of an anecdote. Brecher does himself and his audience a disservice with this bare bones treatment: what is needed is several pounds of flesh.

Postcards from the Edge has been added to your Cart. This was the first book I read by her that wasn't a memoir. I really enjoyed this book the first time I read it, and the movie was good as well. Although it is not classified as a biography, it is largely based on actress Carrie Fisher's life. If you appreciate a sarcastic sense of humor that can sometimes be pretty dark, I think you will enjoy this book. 3 people found this helpful. I have never seen the movie, but I have always wanted to read the book.

Postcards Lyrics Is there a word for that? There should be. You can only fit so many words in a postcard.

I had already fallen in love with far too many postage stamps When you appeared on my doorstep wearing nothing but a postcard promise. No, appear is the wrong word. Is there a word for that? There should be. Only so many in a phone call, only so many into space before you forget that words are sometimes used for things other than filling emptiness. It is hard to build a body out of words – I have tried. Instead of lying your head against my chest, I tell you about the boy who lives downstairs from me.

  • I've probably bought a dozen or so of Brecher's book since I stumbled across it years ago. I've given away copies, and I still hold out hope of finding one autographed. I even contacted the author by phone several years ago. I was going to be in his city, and I wanted to see if he'd have a cup of coffee with me. He graciously declined with other appointments. "Too Sad To Sing" contains beautiful, almost poetic, prose.

    Addition to the above review:

    I occasionally have a touch of guilt claiming a book that is as short as this one and that is filled with a plethora of photographs as one of my Goodreads annual number. The photographs in "Too Sad" are of postcards that Brecher has sent, received, and/or collected over the years. I first read "Too Sad" in the late 90's as I began my own extensive traveling. For the next decade, I sent copious numbers of postcards to friends, each chosen with their personality in mind. One such individual loves baseball, so I sent her postcards of baseball stadiums, teams, and players from the majors to the very minor teams. Another friend was fascinated by libraries, and she received cards from libraries around the world.

    I posted a review of Brecher's book earlier this year, but I loaned my copy (paperback) to a friend, and finally I told her to keep it. I recently acquired another copy (hardback) in pristine condition, and this one will not be loaned, and it will be kept to be passed down to my daughters. I got this first edition for $1.00. It's original cost in 1988 was $22.95. The used bookshop had a penciled cost on the first page of $12.50. Alas, it had been placed on the orphan table after having been passed over by people not realizing the genuine beauty of the writing, and I decided I needed yet another copy after having purchased and given away more than a dozen over the years.

    Upon receipt, however, I was compelled to read the 118 pages again. I'm not sure why I'm drawn over and over again to Brecher's book. One reviewer, Paula M. Zieselman in "The Library Journal," says of it:

    "...his book's hopscotch style and blatant superficiality are as irritating as the whining tone that permeates the whole regardless of the adventure or exciting incident being recalled. In some cases, the reader is left wondering about the resolution of an anecdote. Brecher does himself and his audience a disservice with this bare bones treatment: what is needed is several pounds of flesh. An inconsequential bit of fluff; not recommended."

    It is a book of postcards from various places, why wouldn't it have a "hopscotch" style? I traveled to 35 countries and 43 states, and a collection of my postcards would by it's very nature be "hopscotch." What she calls "irritating and whining" I see as a man in search of himself. Brecher writes that he is still looking for "a card that bears the likeness of someone very much like myself and has this legend on the back: 'Do not be deceived by the sadness in this young man's face. He is just beginning to understand that what dies with him is precisely what is now there to sustain him.'" (118) The very title of the book alerts the reader that there will be a sadness to the collection.

    Finally, Ms. Zieselman complains that "the reader is left wondering about the resolution of an anecdote." To this reviewer that is part of the intrigue of the book. A postcard by its nature leaves events and adventures without resolution. Over the years, I have stumbled across dozens of postcards that I have collected. The cards are snippets of a person's history, and I have no historical context in which to place them, but many of them haunt me for their lack of resolution and context. One I treasure shows a lone figure in front of the Eiffel Tower at what appears to be dusk or dawn. The message reads, "We'll work this out. I wish you'd come to Paris with me." Work what out? Who would turn down a trip to Paris? Did they work it out? I think I like the mystery more than the resolution.

  • I love this beautifaly written memoir. The postcard theme is whimsical and fascinating as well as adding interesting visuals. Wish he would write more!