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ePub Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army life of a New England woman (A Rio Grande classic) download

by Martha Summerhayes

ePub Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army life of a New England woman (A Rio Grande classic) download
Author:
Martha Summerhayes
ISBN13:
978-0873801201
ISBN:
0873801202
Language:
Publisher:
Rio Grande Press (1966)
Category:
Subcategory:
Memoirs
ePub file:
1991 kb
Fb2 file:
1380 kb
Other formats:
docx doc lrf azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
222

LibriVox recording of VANISHED ARIZONA: RECOLLECTIONS OF THE . For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.

LibriVox recording of VANISHED ARIZONA: RECOLLECTIONS OF THE ARMY LIFE OF A NEW ENGLAND WOMAN, by MARTHA SUMMERHAYES. This is the lively autobiography of Martha Summerhayes, the wife of an officer in the American Army. Here, she tells many stories about life and conditions in different camps and forts in which she lived with her expanding family, people along the way, and Journeys. Summary by Stav Nisser). M4B audio book (194mb).

Vanished Arizona is a classic and highly recommended to all those readers-even those keeping drug stores-who want to. .Wonderfully written with honest and vivid descriptions of late 19th century life of an US Army wife

Vanished Arizona is a classic and highly recommended to all those readers-even those keeping drug stores-who want to learn more about the distaff side of Army life during the late nineteenth century. -Roger D. Cunningham, Journal of America's Military Past. Roger D. Cunningham Journal of America's Military Past). Wonderfully written with honest and vivid descriptions of late 19th century life of an US Army wife. Even if this historical topic does not appeal to you the quality of the composition will draw you in.

Summerhayes, Martha, 1844-1926. library of congress; americana.

It offers a unique glimpse of Army life in the .

Vanished Arizona, by Martha Summerhayes is a book of detailed recolections written by Martha about her time in Arizona (beginning in 1874) as the wife of Lt. Jack Summerhayes. It offers a unique glimpse of Army life in the . Army 8th infantry from a woman's point of view. Tales of 120 degree heat, wild animals, childbirth, other Army wives and even a friendship with American artist Frederick Remington. Early Arizona Territory history at its best.

Vanished Arizona book. Although Martha Summerhayes’s recollections span a quarter of a century and life at a dozen army posts, the heart of this book concerns her experiences during the 1870s in Arizona, where (as Dan L. Thrapp observes in his introduction) the harsh climate and "perennial natural inconveniences from rattlesnakes to cactus thorns and white desperadoes, all made a less than desirable. posting for the married man and his wife.

"This is the lively autobiography of Martha Summerhayes, the wife of an officer in the American Army. Here, she tells many stories about life and conditions in different camps and forts in which she lived with her expanding family, people along the way, and Journeys

"This is the lively autobiography of Martha Summerhayes, the wife of an officer in the American Army. Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army Life of a New England Woman by SUMMERHAYES, Martha LibriVox. Listen on Apple Podcasts.

Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain

Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain. Genre(s): Non-fiction, Biography & Autobiography.

Chapter I. germany and the army. Chapter II. I Joined the army. Chapter III. Army house-keeping. Chapter IV. Down the pacific coast. Chapter VI. Up the rio colorado. Chapter VII. The mojave desert.

Vanished Arizona: Recollections of My Army Life is the story of Martha Summerhayes, a Nantucket woman who married a cavalry . Vanished Arizon : Recollections of the Army Life of a New England Woman. by Martha Summerhayes.

Vanished Arizona: Recollections of My Army Life is the story of Martha Summerhayes, a Nantucket woman who married a cavalry officer and moved with him to various.

Book by Summerhayes, Martha
  • The heart of this book is the time Martha Summerhayes spent during the 1870s in Arizona as an army wife. Raised in comfortable circumstances on the East Coast, she was intelligent and educated, but unprepared for the harshness of life in Arizona. Bad food, extreme heat, discomfort and dangerous animals and people were all parts of her life. She sometimes despaired, but never quite gave up. She was a keen observer of all that she experienced. She recognized the problems caused by bad Indian agents and deplored the misery imposed on soldiers by foolish members of temperance societies. Occasionally, there are surprising omissions: there is no mention of the Battle of the Little Bighorn which convulsed the army. This is a very good book , but should it get a four or a five? Martha was too charming to merit less than a five.

  • "Vanished Arizona" provides a remarkable, first-person insight into Army life on America's frontier, by a discerning and perceptive lady. Her experiences traveling with her officer husband and his unit by sea and land into the sparsely populated desert of Arizona Territory are highly readable. She describes as colorful a cast of characters as you could find in any work of fiction. Unlike many accounts of western adventure, this book presents the day-to-day challenges of a family making its home in some of the most primitive conditions imaginable. A sophisticated and educated lady, trained to defer to her husband, contends with preparing meals with mess hall implements and limited supplies, keeping a home and belongings clean and serviceable, and traveling wherever the Army sends her husband.

    Some excerpts:

    "At four o'clock in the morning the cook's call sounded, the mules were fed, and the crunching and the braying were something to awaken the heaviest sleepers. Bowen called us. I was much upset by the dreadful dust, which was thick upon everything I touched. We had to hasten our toilet, as they were striking tents and breaking camp early, in order to reach before noon the next place where there was water. Sitting on camp-stools, around the mess-tables, in the open, before the break of day, we swallowed some black coffee and ate some rather thick slices of bacon and dry bread."

    "The drivers were all armed, and spare rifles hung inside the ambulances. I wore a small derringer, with a narrow belt filled with cartridges. An incongruous sight, methinks now, it must have been. A young mother, pale and thin, a child of scarce three months in her arms, and a pistol belt around her waist!"

    "My attitude towards the places I traveled through was naturally influenced by the fact that I had a young baby in my arms the entire way, and that I was not able to endure hardship at that time."

    "Stoneman's Lake Road was famous, as I afterwards heard. Perhaps it was just as well for me that I did not know about it in advance. The sure-footed mules picked their way over these sharp-edged rocks. There was not a moment's respite. We asked a soldier to help with holding the baby, for my arms gave out entirely, and were as if paralyzed. The jolting threw us all by turns against the sides of the ambulance (which was not padded), and we all got some rather bad bruises. We finally bethought ourselves of the pappoose basket, which we had brought along in the ambulance, having at the last moment no other place to put it. So a halt was called, we placed the tired baby in this semi-cradle, laced the sides snugly over him, and were thus enabled to carry him over those dreadful roads without danger. He did not cry much, but the dust made him thirsty. I could not give him nourishment without stopping the entire train of wagons, on account of the constant pitching of the ambulance; delay was not advisable or expedient, so my poor little son had to endure with the rest of us. The big Alsatian cavalryman held the cradle easily in his strong arms, and so the long miles were traveled, one by one."

    "I did not dream of the power of the desert, nor that I should ever long to see it again."

  • I'm a native of Arizona and am always interested in the history of my state. As I read the book several things were interesting. First, was how did people survive here in the late eighteen hundreds? Second, how did they get from place to place? Finally, do the places mentioned still exist and have I been there? All were answered. Additionally, the book gives an insight into how people lived long before modern technology made life much easier in the desert. I could actually envision the places named, which have greatly change in interim 140 years.

  • This is a great read for everyone. It gives a clear picture of military life and old Arizona. It is hard to put down once you begin, and you will find yourself telling others about it and sharing the experience.

  • I love this book. I purchased it in book form also.

    Made me feel I was there with the people in this book. I have read it many times and will keep doing so at times.

    A true history of a woman's journey with her army husband in the 1880's.
    Awesome book if you like the past of the Old West soldiers life with their families.

    I wish someone would have made a movie based on this book. If they have I haven't seen it and I have seen a lot of Westerns.

  • Brings you face to face with details of army life in the field in late 1800s, and with early days in Arizona and the southwest while those places were just beginning to transition from frontier to settled.

  • As a winter resident in Arizona I totally enjoyed the description of Arizona in the late 1800s and the life of the Army wives who had to endure the hardships of this unforgiving climate in summer with no air conditioning or even ice. Fascinating to read.

  • Very interesting book/story. It is basically the diary of an officers wife and the challenges she faces in Arizona during the Indian Wars. I have both the hard copy and the Kindle version. I got the hard copy before I knew there was a kindle version.