mostraligabue

ePub My Men download

by Laura Rice,Karim Hamdy,Malika Mokeddem

ePub My Men download
Author:
Laura Rice,Karim Hamdy,Malika Mokeddem
ISBN13:
978-0803232624
ISBN:
0803232624
Language:
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press (October 1, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Memoirs
ePub file:
1248 kb
Fb2 file:
1527 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc rtf docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
174

Malika Mokeddem is an Algerian immigrant who has lived most of her life in France Laura Rice is a professor of English at Oregon State University and Karim Hamdy is the director of the Center for Maghrib Studies in Tunis

Malika Mokeddem is an Algerian immigrant who has lived most of her life in France. A medical doctor as well as a writer, she worked in Montpellier as a general practitioner focusing on the health needs of the immigrant North African community until recently, when death threats forced her to close her clinic. Laura Rice is a professor of English at Oregon State University and Karim Hamdy is the director of the Center for Maghrib Studies in Tunis. They are translators of Mokeddem’s Century of Locusts.

Malika Mokeddem is an Algerian exile who has lived most of her life in France. Century of Locusts won several literary awards in France, including the prix Littré. Rice and Hamdy are coauthors of Departures, the translations of and critical essays on the selected writings of Isabelle Eberhardt.

Malika Mokeddem, Laura Rice (Translator). Karim Hamdy (Translator). I must admit that I approached Malika Mokeddem’s memoir with trepidation. I found it hard to believe that I would enjoy a life story recounted only in terms of the men involved

Malika Mokeddem, Laura Rice (Translator). I found it hard to believe that I would enjoy a life story recounted only in terms of the men involved. In retrospect, however, it is possible that a telling of Mokeddem’s story would not have been thoroughly explained without the background she provides on her men. Mokeddem, a French Algerian immigrant, was raised in a society that encourages huge discrepancies between the treatment of men and women, to say the least.

Century of Locusts, by Malika Mokeddem. Translated by Laura Rice and Karim Hamdy. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2006. 95 (Paper) ISBN 0-8032-8306-7. Julie Hakim Azzam (a1). University of Pittsburgh.

My Men by. Malika Mokeddem, Laura Rice (Translator). Century of Locusts by. Malika Mokeddem, Laura Rice (Introduction). Karim Hamdy (Introduction).

Laura Rice is Professor of Comparative Literature at Oregon State University and cotranslator (with Karim Hamdy) of Century of Locusts by Malika Mokeddem and Departures by Isabelle Eberhardt. Библиографические данные. Of Irony and Empire: Islam, the West, and the Transcultural Invention of Africa SUNY series, Explorations in Postcolonial Studies SUNY series, Explorations in Postcolonial Studies.

Translated by Laura Rice and Karim Hamdy. Century of Locusts, by Malika Mokeddem.

Malika Mokeddem; Professor Laura Rice; Karim Hamdy. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Mokeddem hauntingly describes how her literary and medical careers blossomed along with her sexuality and her desire to escape the gender bias that shackled Algerian tradition.

My Men by Malika Mokeddem, translated by Laura Rice and Karim Hamdy, U Nebraska . Books in Progress Unsung Hero: Cooney at Cornell. Situating Senior Women in the Literacy Landscape of North Africa.

My Men by Malika Mokeddem, translated by Laura Rice and Karim Hamdy, U Nebraska Pr, 2009. Of Irony and Empire: the Transcultural Invention of Contemporary North Africa. SUNY Press, 2007 and 2008. Century of Locusts by Malika Mokeddem, trans. B. refereed articles & chapters.

A cross between kiss-and-tell and curse-and-tell, Malika Mokeddem’s memoir of the men in her life presents a mosaic of relationships defining what it is to be a woman, an immigrant, a doctor, and a citizen of an uncertain world. From her childhood days in French colonial Algeria to her later years as a doctor in Paris and a writer in Montpellier, Mokeddem traces the path of a brilliant girl in a world of men. Anorexia, insomnia, financial independence, escapism in books, atheism, self-imposed exile, painting, and the poetics of free love—such are the various ways in which she has responded to discrimination.  Mokeddem hauntingly describes how her literary and medical careers blossomed along with her sexuality and her desire to escape the gender bias that shackled Algerian tradition. At once a scathing critique of Algerian patriarchy and a soaring tribute to the men who opened a window on the world, Mokeddem’s story is a fascinating portrait of gender as it is actually felt, lived, and never left behind.