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ePub Meeting Sophie: A Memoir of Adoption download

by Nancy McCabe

ePub Meeting Sophie: A Memoir of Adoption download
Author:
Nancy McCabe
ISBN13:
978-0826264459
ISBN:
082626445X
Language:
Publisher:
University of Missouri (October 6, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Memoirs
ePub file:
1528 kb
Fb2 file:
1231 kb
Other formats:
docx mobi txt azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
136

Meeting Sophie: A Memoir. has been added to your Cart. Nancy McCabe had this problem; she was denied tenure during her adoption pursuit. She found a job at another university, but sure had a stressful time of it for a while.

Meeting Sophie: A Memoir. I remember that while I pursued my Master's as a single mother, I was always telling my advisors that my family came first, and always telling my family that I needed some time to study. Neither group seemed entirely satisfied (particularly my advisors, although I made it through just fine).

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McCabe, Nancy, 1962-. Biography: general, Child welfare, Parenthood, Personal Memoirs, China, Biography & Autobiography, Family, Parenting, Childbirth, phy, USA, Single mothers, Adoption, Intercountry adoption, United States, Adoptive parents. Columbia : University of Missouri Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on November 17, 2011.

McCabe had many reservations about rearing a child alone in this climate, but the desire to become a mother would not go away. McCabe had many reservations about rearing a child alone in this climate, but the desire to become a mother would not go away. Meeting Sophie tells the story of McCabe adopting a Chinese daughter and the many obstacles she faced during the adoption and adjustment process as she renegotiated her role within her family and fought difficulties in her job.

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oceedings{McCabe2003MeetingSA, title {Meeting Sophie: A Memoir of Adoption}, author {Nancy C. McCabe}, year {2003} }. Nancy C. McCabe. The Allen Institute for AIProudly built by AI2 with the help of our. Collaborators.

Meeting Sophie is not just about "the adoption process McCabe's book strikes a chord with many of us who are adopted and ever wondered about the special relationship that can develop in chosen families.

Meeting Sophie is not just about "the adoption process. McCabe's book strikes a chord with many of us who are adopted and ever wondered about the special relationship that can develop in chosen families. Never before have I read about the two-way path between mothers (and fathers) and children who find each other with such pathos and wonder. McCabe is a lucky Mom to have been adopted by such a wonderful little girl.

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  • This was a good, well written book, but I expected more about the adoption. It was more about the author's life during that time, with the adoption thrown in.

  • I can relate to McCabe on a number of levels. Far from expecting a dry "here's the adoption process" sort of missive, I was quite glad to hear McCabe's emotional thoughts as she pursued bringing her daughter home from China.

    Ms. McCabe happens to be a single woman with a Ph.D. and a job in academia. I've begun my own doctoral studies this fall, and my husband and I are also considering adopting from China. If the adoption goes through, I'll be close to the end of my program before we travel to China. I don't think there will be a conflict, as I want to keep my hours minimal and flexible (and plan to coordinate with my advisors well in advance of any interruption of my studies), but I wonder what others will think about my priorities.

    Nancy McCabe had this problem; she was denied tenure during her adoption pursuit. She found a job at another university, but sure had a stressful time of it for a while. I remember that while I pursued my Master's as a single mother, I was always telling my advisors that my family came first, and always telling my family that I needed some time to study. Neither group seemed entirely satisfied (particularly my advisors, although I made it through just fine).

    I appreciate that McCabe's book addresses the issues surrounding becoming a mother (which apply to *anyone*, not just adoptive mothers), particularly mothers working in the academic world.

    I could also relate to McCabe's experiences with well-meaning, well-loved parents who couldn't quite interact in ways that were completely supportive to her goals and feelings (they try, and the love is absolutely there, but they somehow manage to miss the mark). I understood the feeling of loss, both before and after her father died. I appreciated that she shared this aspect of her life, as well, as it makes the journey that much more real (life doesn't stop or become any more simple just because you're adopting a child).

    Ultimately, I was very encouraged by McCabe's book, and came away thinking, "Well, if she can make it, I bet I can, too!" Thanks, Nancy.

  • I think that Nancy McCabe's memoir is so good that I order it for my students at the college where I teach as part of the required reading material in my literature class on cultural identity. I first picked it up a few years ago when I was reading everything I could get my hands on about Chinese adoptions before my husband and I adopted our daughter from China. However, I was pleasantly surprised to find that this is a memoir about much more than international adoption. McCabe is writing about identity within the family, the myths that parents and other members of a family often create about one another, and the struggle of finding one's identity especially as a girl in America. I think that in many ways the book shows how much all women--in America, China, etc.--have in common when it comes to the dilemma of needing to be an individual yet wanting to be accepted. I think that the subtitle of this book (A Memoir of Adoption) needs to be omitted or changed and that the book needs to be marketed as a memoir about cultural identity, parenting, and self-discovery--as well as adoption.

  • The reader who wasn't interested in McCabe's personal life doesn't seem to understand that a memoir is by definition a narrative composed from personal experience. Meeting Sophie is not just about "the adoption process." Instead, it eloquently and poignantly demonstrates how becoming a parent--however one accomplishes it--affects all aspects of a life, making other challenges seem larger and at the same time easier to face.
    A moving and inspiring story.

  • Although I completed reading this book from the first page to the last, I only did so because I thought for sure the author was going to have some big time, life changing, realization at the end of her story. Her tone throughout the book is negative. She talks often about her own childhood issues, employment issues, and doubts about the adoption (which we all have, but hers seemed unfair to her future daughter). I found myself thinking, "We all have problems in our life, suck it up" and "how is her daughter going to feel when she reads this as an adult?" I don't think this is an appropriate book to read if you are looking for information about the process of adoption (I don't think the author meant this book to be about the process anyway) or if you are looking for inspiring adoption stories. If you are, however, looking for the story of a single mother who feels mistreated by everyone (her family, her coworkers, society, other adoptive parents) then this book might be for you. I found that even the writing of this book made me wonder what her editor was thinking. She uses one or two metaphors a couple times throughout. At least, enough for me to realize that I had read that same line earlier in the book.

  • Nany McCabe has a way with words; she created such a powerful, moving story. From the beginning I got the sense that she was an interesting and intelligent person, but what I loved is how she grew emotionally. Through the book, she began recognizing the love and the limitations of love that bound her and her family. This book helped me analyze parent and adult children dynamics as well as reflect on adoptive parent and child relationships. As a daughter and an upcoming adoptive mother, I felt a sense of recognition and hope.

  • I read this book years ago and loved it. I'm very happy to see there's a sequel! All the very best to Nancy McCabe and her Sophie.

  • I would recommend this book to any single person considering overseas adoption. It was easy to read and enjoyable but I found the author had some strange views. It was almost like she was very unprepared for motherhood and had some family issues of her own to deal with already.

    It wasn't my favourite adoption book but I did enjoy it. To be honest, it made me feel a whole lot better about my own situation!