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ePub The Danger Tree : Memory, War, and the Search for a Family's Past download

by David MacFarlane

ePub The Danger Tree : Memory, War, and the Search for a Family's Past download
Author:
David MacFarlane
ISBN13:
978-0921912316
ISBN:
0921912315
Publisher:
MacFarlane Walter & Ross (1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Memoirs
ePub file:
1624 kb
Fb2 file:
1700 kb
Other formats:
rtf doc azw lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
224

by. Macfarlane, David, 1952-.

by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station26. cebu on November 15, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

David MacFarlane's father was the only one of six brothers to survive World War I. Unlike them, he didn't go to. . Unlike them, he didn't go to France. One of his two sisters served as a nurse there, too. The Danger Tree traces the lives of these siblings from Newfoundland and the effects of the war on the survivors and the survivors' descendants.

The Danger Tree book. David MacFarlane tells the story of his mother's Newfoundlander heritage by assembling family stories of his maternal great-grandparents and his great aunts and uncles. Emulating the circuitous tales told by his mother's relatives, the. The often tragic stories include deaths in the First World War, from which the title "The Danger Tree" comes from. The Danger Tree" was a marker in the no-man's-land between the Allied and German trenches where the Newfoun Come From Away. This was a totally engaging family history which also encompassed the history of Newfoundland.

Place of Publication. Paperback Henry David Thoreau Books. Peter David Paperback Books.

Macfarlane is a masterful writer, and his work is filled with insight, thoughtfulness about the past, dead .

Macfarlane is a masterful writer, and his work is filled with insight, thoughtfulness about the past, dead ancestors, and what they mean to those of us still living, even if we'd never met them. This is a great novel about how a war can affect a family, the family business and the province for many years after the war. Before WWI Newfoundland was a the oldest and thriving member of the British Empire (they joined Canada in 1949). When they were called to war they sent their best sons, and they sent all of them.

One of the best family history books I've ever read, and yet it isn't that either. The ending was striking-I'll probably never forget the image he painted on the last page. Loved it from start to finish.

David Macfarlane is a Canadian journalist, playwright and novelist. His Newfoundland family memoir, "The Danger Tree," (published as Come From Away in the United States) published in 1991, was greeted with extraordinary international acclaim. lieutenant was described by the Wall Street Journal as a moving tale of love, fate, and regret. David Macfarlane’s magazine and newspaper writing has earned him a National Newspaper Award and numerous National Magazine Awards. His play, "Fishwrap," premiered at the Tarragon Theatre in Toronto.

And it is these stories of the Goodyear family of Newfoundland, which Macfarlane recalls as he relates a.A remarkable and beautifully written book in which the rich stuff of family and local history join together to entertain, to instruct, and.

And it is these stories of the Goodyear family of Newfoundland, which Macfarlane recalls as he relates a family history, that are in many ways a history of Newfoundland itself. Until voting to join Canada in 1948, Newfoundland was Britain's oldest colony, and this decision, which the author's grandfather could never forgive, led to one of the great family stories, for the old man apparently once told the now-Queen, in Newfoundland on a visit, exactly what he thought.

Award-winning author and journalist David Macfarlane was born and raised in.

Award-winning author and journalist David Macfarlane was born and raised in Hamilton, Ontario, "an unexceptional place" in his own words; "Up-Along," as it was called by his mother's Newfoundland relatives. Those stories both inspire and inform The Danger Tree, Macfarlane's critically acclaimed history of his mother's family. Macfarlane elegantly interweaves a hundred years' worth of stories about his mother's grandparents, parents, uncles, and aunt with key incidents from Newfoundland's history and the great twentieth-century events that shaped the fates of both family and island.

deep
  • I don't have a lot of time to write reviews, and I don't often write them, but I enjoyed this book so thoroughly that I'm sad to be finished reading it. It's one of the best memoirs I've ever read, though it's not really a memoir. One of the best family history books I've ever read, and yet it isn't that either. It is hands-down my favorite book about Newfoundland that I've read, though there are many more I want to read. Macfarlane is a masterful writer, and his work is filled with insight, thoughtfulness about the past, dead ancestors, and what they mean to those of us still living, even if we'd never met them. Though I'm wary of reviews that say things like this, he really does, quite improbably, tell a compelling story of Newfoundland itself through the story of his ancestors. The book somehow never descends into the maudlin or sentimental; it's quite a clear-eyed view of the meaning of World War I for Newfoundland and for the Goodyear family. The ending was striking--I'll probably never forget the image he painted on the last page. Loved it from start to finish.

  • Fantastic read! Very gripping history of Newfoundland and how it metamorphasized into its current existence through the lives & times of some of its more prominent characters. Could hardly put the book down, and when the story finished, left me wanting more. Extremely well written.

  • I purchased this book when I was in Newfoundland this last summer because I wanted to learn more about my own heritage as my grandfather's family is from the same area where this book takes place, during roughly the same time period and I wanted to learn more about my own family. This book is sad, but poignantly written, and describes the times very well. My only complaint is that I really needed a family tree. The author seemed to jump around generations a bit and I found myself trying to figure out who was who.

  • I am ashamed to say that although I have lived in Canada for 37 years, I knew nothing about Newfoundland's history and consequently nothing about Newfoundland's participation in the First World War. A university lecturer recommended this book to me, and I heartily recommend it to anyone with an interest in the First World War (and in Newfoundland, more broadly). It is a beautifully written, poignant book which compares favourably with Robert Graves' Goodbye to All That and in some ways is better than Graves; it has none of Graves' cynicism.
    This book inspired me to visit Beaumont Hamel on the Somme, where so many men from Newfoundland lost their lives on 1 July 1916. In the rest of Canada, 1 July is considered a day for celebration, because the country came into being on that date in 1867. Now I understand why Newfoundlanders cannot and will not celebrate 1 July as a holiday. For them, it is a day of mourning.
    Ironically, for us on the west coast of Canada, Beaumont Hamel is easier to reach than Newfoundland. Having visited the former, I hope one day to visit the latter.

  • Pitifully few Americans are even aware of Canada's participation in World War I. Fewer still know Canada suffered horrible casualties which it honors on Rememberance Day, a deeply felt, painfully observed day of mourning.
    David MacFarlane's father was the only one of six brothers to survive World War I. Unlike them, he didn't go to France. One of his two sisters served as a nurse there, too.
    The Danger Tree traces the lives of these siblings from Newfoundland and the effects of the war on the survivors and the survivors' descendants. It is in part a memoir and in part a carefully researched work of journalism by a gifted "light" columnist for The Globe and Mail in Toronto.
    The ordinary deaths of these ordinary young men from a hard-working Scots family surviving in a very tough environment have found a memorial in MacFarlane's writing. But of greater significance is MacFarlane's insistance that the effects of their deaths, the effects of the First War, live today.
    It occurs to me that The Danger Tree is a book one should read immediately after Robert Graves' Goodby to All That. For MacFarlane adds dimensions of time and distance to the soldier's pain. MacFarlane is a fine writer, but Graves was a great one. Still, the two books sit comfortably together on my shelves.
    A brilliant book.

  • This is an amazing book: history, biography, auto-biograhy, philosphy all combined into a powerful tale of family character (and characters)that stays with you. In essence, a simple reflection on long past lives from a little corner of the world, Newfoundland, all wound up in the Great War, it becomes a haunting tour-de-force of the power of great events on everyday people.
    The chapter "Fire" is in itself a small masterpiece and one I find reading again and again even now two years after the first read.
    I picked this book up by sheer accident in a small bookstore in Banff and have been thankful for my good fortune of discovering this gem.

  • This is a great novel about how a war can affect a family, the family business and the province for many years after the war. Before WWI Newfoundland was a the oldest and thriving member of the British Empire (they joined Canada in 1949). When they were called to war they sent their best sons, and they sent all of them. In one battle on July 1st, the Royal Nlfd Regiment was almost completely wiped out. This has effected the economy and liveihood of the island for years. The RNR monuments of a bellowing caribou on the battlefields of France are a testiment of their valour. While the rest of Canada celebrates Canada Day on July 1st, to the Newfoundlanders it is a day of mourning and rememberance the RNR and the sacrafices they made. This book is a great testimony to the brave Newfoundlanders and their families during that time.

  • This book stays with you long long after you've read the last page. One of the few books I will re-read.