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by Curt Flood

ePub The way it is, download
Author:
Curt Flood
ISBN13:
978-0671270766
ISBN:
0671270761
Language:
Publisher:
Trident Press (1971)
Category:
ePub file:
1526 kb
Fb2 file:
1975 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
661

Curtis Charles Flood (January 18, 1938 – January 20, 1997) was an American baseball player. He was a center fielder who played 15 seasons in the major leagues for the Cincinnati Redlegs, St. Louis Cardinals, and Washington Senators.

Curtis Charles Flood (January 18, 1938 – January 20, 1997) was an American baseball player. Flood was a three-time All-Star, a Gold Glove winner for seven consecutive seasons, and batted over. He led the National League (NL) in hits (211) in 1964 and in singles, 1963, 1964, and 1968.

For its era, the book is on a par with Bouton's Ball Four, though it doesn't get much past Flood's decision not to accept a trade from St. Louis to Philadelphia (after which, some years later, baseball's reserve clause was eliminated, allowing players to have some say as to where they played upon the end of a contract). It's total bullshit, though, that when you look up Curt Flood on this site the first book that turns up is Bunts by George Will.

The Way It Is" was published in 1971, as a watershed in baseball history was approaching. The late Curt Flood was not some dumb jock. This book is part autobiography and part polemic. Author Curt Flood, a baseball star, was challenging baseball's reserve clause in a lower federal court. Under the reserve clause, an owner had perpetual contract rights over a player once he was signed unless the player was released, which would normally constitute a group boycott under the antitrust laws. A great deal of what he writes about is now historical, yet it's interesting to see how things looked first hand then.

Flood, Curt, 1938-1997. New York, Trident Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Curtis Charles Flood (January 18, 1938 – January 20, 1997) was a Major League Baseball player from 1956 to 1971. He spent the better part of his career with the St. Louis Cardinals (1958–1969), where he won seven consecutive Gold Glove Awards from 1963 to 1969.

Select Format: Hardcover. Mass Market Paperback. ISBN13:9780671270766. Release Date:January 1971.

A defensive standout, he led the National League in putouts four times and in fielding percentage twice, winning Gold Glove Awards in his last seven full seasons from 1963–1969.

Who Curtis Charles Flood was and precisely his significance in baseball history is something that can't be understood just by looking at the record book. Not that Flood suffers from such an examination. He played 15 years from 1956 to 1971

Who Curtis Charles Flood was and precisely his significance in baseball history is something that can't be understood just by looking at the record book. He played 15 years from 1956 to 1971. He took the 1970 season off, which is something I'll discuss in a moment. 293, was a three-time All-Star, and, playing centerfield for the St. Louis Cardinals, won Gold Glove seven consecutive seasons, from 1963-1969. He was on three pennant-winning teams with the Cardinals and earned two World Series rings

Just better Curt Flood is a nonparticipating but pivotal character in the book Our Gang by Philip Roth.

Later that year Flood published a memoir entitled The Way It Is in which he spelled out in detail his argument against the reserve clause.

We've met so many amazing locals (and some not so local!) and it was such a beautiful experience to come out of an intense and stressful life changing event. Edgecumbe Flood Book - The Day The Wall Broke. 5 December at 21:52 ·. And that, whanau, is a wrap!

Book by Flood, Curt
  • Curt Flood articulates his powerful opinions on Major League Baseball and a myriad of issues in this not-so-typical autobiography.

    Penned in the early 1970s when Flood was perceived by baseball management, many fans, too many players and most media members as a hideous trouble maker due to his challenging the reserve clause that bound players for life with one team.

    Critics savaged the book when it was published, stating Flood could not get over his anger concerning how the game is (should) be played. But I contend much of the criticism circled around the black consciousness of Flood's; simply, he should know his place as a star athlete and be grateful for the doors that have been opened to him due to his celebrity.

    The Way It Is contains a message that strongly states why change was necessary, on the field & off. It is unfortunate that nearly 40 years later many of the issues that Flood brought up still needs to be addressed by society as a whole.

  • I ENJOYED THE BOOK.
    THANK YOU,
    ROGER

  • This is one book that I will give to many people.

  • "The Way It Is" was published in 1971, as a watershed in baseball history was approaching. Author Curt Flood, a baseball star, was challenging baseball's reserve clause in a lower federal court. Under the reserve clause, an owner had perpetual contract rights over a player once he was signed unless the player was released, which would normally constitute a group boycott under the antitrust laws. In 1972, in Flood v. Kuhn, the U.S. Supreme Court by a 5-3 vote upheld baseball's antitrust exemption even though it admitted baseball was in interstate commerce (Supreme Court precedent was that baseball was not in interstate commerce; go figure). It was up to Congress to repeal the exemption, the court stated, in one of its worst rulings ever. It is worth noting that Part I of Justice Harry Blackmun's majority opinion was a corny homage to baseball citing baseball lore and baseball heroes, and it was ridiculed in many legal circles and elsewhere.

    "The Way It Is" is a declaration by Flood, now deceased, that baseball IS FOR SURE engaged in interstate commerce. Granted, it is also an attack on racism in baseball. Blacks suffered from segregation in spring training camps, mistreatment by managers and other people, and discrimination in pay, and they were often shut off from lucrative endorsements. Blacks may have been on the bottom more than whites, but Flood wrote: "I told the [MLB Players' Association] meeting that organized baseball's policies and practices affected all players equally." From the labor relations perspective, he embraced all.

    Flood wrote in this book that the owners' concern is not the "Good of the Game," but to make a profit. He pointed out that in 1969, the players, pension plan included, got only 20 percent of the industry's total income. This was much lower than in other industries, and in 1929 players got 35%. Flood weaved the long season, new stadiums, synthetic fields, TV and radio, and much else into his profit motive theme. He disputed the contention that major league clubs at that time were in financial straits. For me, the most interesting part is Chapter 10: Flood's history of baseball labor relations starting in 1946. He presented compelling arguments in his narrative about how things were stacked in the owners' favor. Regarding one occasion in which Commissioner Happy Chandler supported the players in a pension fund dispute, Flood wrote, "As far as I know, this was the only occasion on which any Commissioner of Baseball has ever permitted facts to undermine his relationship with owners." He forgot Chandler backed Branch Rickey when all other owners voted against integrating the sport.

    This book received a lot of criticism for its cynicism. I once read a baseball piece acknowledging it as being "bitter and uncompromising." Flood made no bones about not having a "golly gee" attitude just because a certain mindset suggested a person like him should. From Justice Blackmun on down, these were the people who were preventing necessary progress in the battle of the players against the owners. Flood looks pretty good in hindsight, for some of the occurrences he recounts ring of silliness 40 years later. Jim Bouton, author of the revealing book "Ball Four," was called into Commissioner Bowie Kuhn's office, Flood wrote, and "[i]t was made clear to Bouton that when truth challenged mythology a wise ballplayer keeps his mouth shut."

    Certainly Flood said many good as well as bad things about people, white and black, in this book, and he backed his labor points with reasoned arguments. It matters little that many bad things can be said about baseball players of the 21st century and that an argument can be made that free agency hurts team identity. It was still wrong for baseball teams to have exclusive contractual rights to players. Three years after Flood v. Kuhn, the reserve clause began to be shredded outside the court system (but baseball's antitrust exemption exists to this day). I would only say to Flood that he should remember the positives too. The profit motive existed with many abuses and still does, but it has not been the ONLY thing that made baseball, including owners, tick. Baseball's positive contribution to American society is not a myth, but a reality. Competition, drama, role models, charity, and actions on behalf of fans and, yes, players, have marked the game too. Perhaps Flood would respond that he loved baseball too, and that is why he wanted to see wrongs righted.

  • Curt Flood (1938-1997) wrote this passionate autobiography in the early 1970's as he challenged baseball's labor policies in federal court. The result is a nice mix of athletic memoirs and political protest. Flood describes his California upbringing, and then bitterly recalls playing minor league ball in the segregated South. There he usually had to stay in "colored" rooming houses and eat on the team bus (most restaurants were off limits). Readers learn of his lengthy career as a star centerfielder, first with Cincinnati (1956-1957), and then with the St. Louis Cardinals (1958-1969) of Stan Musial, Bob Gibson, Tim McCarver, Lou Brock and Orlando Cepeda. Flood also describes the life of major leaguers and such once-hushed subjects as baseball groupies, the sport's hierarchy, salary negotiations and race relations.

    Flood argues powerfully against baseball's reserve clause, which bound players to their team until the team sold, traded or released them - unfairly limiting each player's bargaining power. The U.S. Supreme Court eventually ruled 5-3 against Flood in 1972, but his challenge helped bring future players free agency, salary arbitration, and large pay checks. Sadly, only a tiny number of future millionaire ballplayers ever thanked Flood before he passed away in 1997.

    This is not your typical athletic biography. This is an intelligent book by an intelligent (if slightly flawed) man, its pages aimed at urbane and thinking readers.

  • I consider Curt Flood a great example of a man who was willing to take a stand on principle knowing he would probably lose everything he had ever worked for including his great career. I thought it a shame that he had to take on the abusive baseball establishment on his own without any current ball players of the time standing up with him. He had to have been the lonliest man in the world. When I hear about individuals who are worthy of respect , I have to think that Curt Flood is at the top of the list. His book was one of the earliest to describe the true, honest nature of the life of an American professional athlete prior to free agency. It is not just an autobiography of a ball player but a study of society, tradition, power, and the need for change.

  • Hopefully more people will find a way to get their hands on this after the HBO Special "The Curious Case of Curt Flood". I read this book as a teenager, and this man was something else. I mean he was a painter also. This man Flood laid down his career for a principal and he won the war but loss the battle. Every athlete today should know and pay tribute to him an Marvin Miller. He changed the game and he should be honored. Great book from his point of view. Other books have been written about his case, but this one is coming from the source!!!