mostraligabue
» » Hitler's Diplomat: The Life and Times of Joachim von Ribbentrop

ePub Hitler's Diplomat: The Life and Times of Joachim von Ribbentrop download

by John Weitz

ePub Hitler's Diplomat: The Life and Times of Joachim von Ribbentrop download
Author:
John Weitz
ISBN13:
978-0395621523
ISBN:
0395621526
Language:
Publisher:
Ticknor & Fields; First Edition edition (August 1, 1992)
Category:
ePub file:
1675 kb
Fb2 file:
1361 kb
Other formats:
docx doc lrf txt
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
614

As Hitler's foreign minister, Ribbentrop played an important role in the formation of the Rome-Berlin Axis and the Russo-German nonaggression pact of 1939.

As Hitler's foreign minister, Ribbentrop played an important role in the formation of the Rome-Berlin Axis and the Russo-German nonaggression pact of 1939. Captured by British troops at war's end, he was tried at Nuremberg and hanged for his roles in the deportation of Jews and in planning the attack on Poland. Weitz ( Friends in High Places ) describes how Ribbentrop became a wealthy wine merchant after WW I, a successful social climber in Berlin and an early member of the Nazi Party. His motive for joining remains baffling, however.

A well-to-do social climber who made and married money, von Ribbentrop was among the few in Hitler's circle with a claim to social prominence.

As ambassador to England, von Ribbentrop quickly worked his way up to head the Foreign Ministry, along the way negotiating the British Naval Agreement, the Anti-Comintern Pact, and the Soviet Non-Aggression Pact.

Hitlers Diplomat book. Ribbentrop was Hitler's foreign minister during the war years, having previously served as Germany's ambassador to Great Britain. A poor ambassador, his greatest achievement was the pact with Russia, obviated by Operation Barbarossa. Following that there was little room for diplomacy. In an sense, Ribbentrop's 'career' was primarily that of a opportunistic social climber. He had Picked this one up at Armadillo's Pillow, the last remaining used bookstore in Chicago's Rogers Park neighborhood.

WW2 German Hitlers Diplomat Von Ribbentrop Book. PLOTTING HITLER'S DEATH by JOACHIM FEST - WW2 BOOK. Hitler's Great Panzer Heist: Germany's Foreign Armor in Action, 1939-1945. WW2 German Ribbentrop A Biography Book. Life with the Enemy: Collaboration and Resistance in Hitler's Europe 1939-1945.

In 1932, von Papen asked Ribbentrop to meet with Hitler to convince him to form a coalition government. Hitler refused-but converted Ribbentrop to National Socialism in the process

In 1932, von Papen asked Ribbentrop to meet with Hitler to convince him to form a coalition government. Hitler refused-but converted Ribbentrop to National Socialism in the process. Among the Nazis, Ribbentrop was an anomaly-most of the Nazi leadership was of proletarian or lower-middle-class stock-and he was constantly at pains to demonstrate his loyalty. This led to many diplomatic frescos (such as that when Ribbentrop, after presenting his credentials to the king of England, gave a Nazi salute) and ultimately cost him his life at Nuremberg.

A trivial, chatty biography of Hitler's instrument for foreign policy, drawn essentially from a scant number of published sources and marred by factual errors and an ahistorical perspective. A trivial, chatty biography of Hitler's instrument for foreign policy, drawn essentially from a scant number of published sources and marred by factual errors and an ahistorical perspective. More: Europe Germany. Hitler's Diplomat: The Life And Times Of Joachim Von Ribbentrop.

Joachim von Ribbentrop: Hitler's diplomat. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780297811572. Release Date:January 1992.

It is hard to connect the Ribbentrop of the 1920s, a bright young man-about- town in Jazz Age BerlinĀ .

It is hard to connect the Ribbentrop of the 1920s, a bright young man-about- town in Jazz Age Berlin with the later supporte.

This first full-length English-language biography of Joachim von Ribbentrop, Adolf Hitler's notorious foreign minister, is also an authoritative account of the social and political workings of Nazi Germany. The result of a lifetime of research and firsthand experience, the book combines narrative history of the highest order and intimate familiarity with the people, events, and social currents that animated Hitler's regime.A well-to-do social climber who made and married money, von Ribbentrop was among the few in Hitler's circle with a claim to social prominence. As ambassador to England, von Ribbentrop quickly worked his way up to head the Foreign Ministry, along the way negotiating the British Naval Agreement, the Anti-Comintern Pact, and the Soviet Non-Aggression Pact. Frustrated during the war, when diplomacy was rendered virtually obsolete, von Ribbentrop never forsook his Fuhrer even at Nurnberg, where he was tried and hanged as a senior war criminal.With a provocative foreword by Tom Wolfe that draws disturbing comparisons between the Berlin of the 1930s and American society of the 1980s, Hitler's Diplomat is not only the riveting story of one of Hitler's closest collaborators, it also provides a window onto a side of Nazi Germany that is as fascinating as it is troubling: the men and women of culture and means who gave themselves to Hitler and his war machine.
  • John Weitz's biography, "Hitler's Diplomat: The Life and Times of Joachim von Ribbentrop" is a good look at one of Hitler's most trusted. A German-born Jew and former U.S. intelligence officer, Weitz brings a unique perspective to his work. If one were to look at Hitler's entourage objectively, outside of their known history, they would seem a bunch of clowns that would be hard to take seriously. Center stage for much of the Third Reich farce was the clown Ribbentrop. Weitz notes just how foolish Ribbentrop often was, even by Nazi standards. Quite oblivious to his insensitivity, Weitz notes, Ribbentrop gave the stiff-armed Nazi salute at the coronation of King George VI. Further illustrating his ineptness in the field of diplomacy, Ribbentrop placed a Nazi wreath at the tomb of Britain's unknown soldier from WWI. He was a man so vain he had a distant relative adopt him while he was in middle age just so that he could add the aristocratic "von" to his name. Weitz is careful to measure anecdotes such as these, as well as his boundless ambition, against his firm relationship with Hitler. For some reason, Hitler believed the man to be a statesman on the order of Bismarck. This was reinforced after Ribbentrop's triumphant moment- the signing of the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact in August, 1939. After that political victory, however, Ribbentrop's star began to fade as Hitler had less and less use for his talents when the war increasingly consumed the Fuhrer's attention.

    The farce of Nazi Germany becomes much less funny when one considers the enormity of the regime's crimes. Ribbentrop too participated in the Holocaust, Weitz notes. While not as active as Himmler and other figures in the machinery of genocide, Ribbentrop made certain that diplomatic wheels were oiled for deportations, and that the office of the foreign ministry served the goals of the SS. Weitz presents Ribbentrop as a man who was clever yet stupid, a combination that proved disastrous for millions of human beings in Europe during World War II.

    Weitz is not a professional historian, and this is occasionally evident in the book. Some areas of Ribbentrop's life appear to be investigated in a less than thorough manner. Yet the book still largely succeeds in presenting an important overview of the man, from a unique and insightful perspective. (Weitz also authored a wonderful novel set in Nazi Germany, "Friends in High Places," and as a side note, his sons were the creative team behind the "American Pie" movies.)

  • Unbelievable insight into the inner workings of Hitler's high command. Many unknown facts and fascinating story of Hitler's climb to the top. Many insights into the personalities that made up the connection of von Ribbentrop and the leaders of the world powers. It was more complex than I would have imagined with his close connection with Great Britain. His uneven connection with Italy, Spain and the Soviet Union. His constant treaties, always being broken but used to gain power and position. Fascinating reading.

  • Boring novel.

  • This is a fascinating book about a man who can only be described as one of Hitler's lackeys. What makes it so interesting is the author's insight into how Ribbentrop became so degraded, and a vivid description of the world in which he moved. The author's father lived in that same Berlin social life as Ribbentrop, until he had to leave Germany. (The author's father was Jewish.) I think growing up in that world is what gives the author such insight into these misguided social climbers. The author himself served in WW2 with the OSS (later to become the CIA). This also colors his writing and he cuts no one slack. French collaborators, English appeasers, German cowards, American isolationists, all are called out as they appear in the story. I find this frankness refreshing. This is an extraordinarily well researched and written book, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.

  • This book is a biography of Hitler's Foreign Minister for much of his reign, Joachim von Ribbentrop. Von Ribbentrop was a former champagne salesman (much was made of this by other Nazis) turned diplomat who served first as a special envoy, later as ambassador to Great Britain, and finally as Foreign Minister of Nazi Germany. He was essentially a colorless functionary, a boring and not-too-involved character who found his role increasingly irrelevant as Hitler switched from bullying neighboring countries into submission to conquering them.

    I read this book largely because I had read another book of the author's (Hitler's Banker) and enjoyed it. I must confess, this book wasn't as good. For one thing, it's hard to sympathize with the subject at all, though the author does make it clear that von Ribbentrop was a good husband and father to his family. The author apparently had little access to information not published elsewhere, however, so he pads his account of the life of the Foreign Minister of Germany with a series of anecdotes and incidents which have little to do with his main subject. This, to my mind, cripples the book at least somewhat.

    It's hard to read a book like this, in that you're not going to enjoy it, because the main character isn't a nice person, really. Given that, the book is well-written, and I would recommend it to someone who wishes to know more about the Nazis.

  • Very poor biography. Many times in this book a couple of pages would go by without anything to do with von Ribbentrop. There are serious gaps, but extensive passages that have nothing to do with von Ribbentrop. One omission: von Ribbentrop was the high Nazi official who perhaps did more to try to topple British interests in the Middle East, particularly Iraq. However, you wouldn't know it from this book, as there is no mention of it. The author also does a bit too much editorializing about von Ribbentrop and the Nazi leadership, as if he was afraid that if he didn't do so, some readers might believe he was pro-Nazi. The Michael Bloch treatment of von Ribbentrop is much superior.