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ePub Sunday's Child? - A Memoir download

by Leslie Baruch Brent

ePub Sunday's Child? - A Memoir download
Author:
Leslie Baruch Brent
ISBN13:
978-1904408444
ISBN:
1904408443
Language:
Publisher:
Bank House Books (February 21, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Professionals & Academics
ePub file:
1730 kb
Fb2 file:
1232 kb
Other formats:
lit azw mobi docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
111

Sunday's Child? - A Memoir book.

Sunday's Child? - A Memoir book.

Leslie Brent came to Britain in one of the first - perhaps THE first - Kindertransport, the arraangement that brought German Jewish children to safety in the UK in the late 1930s. He became one of Britain's greatest life-scientists. This a a wonderfully written, clear and compelling memoir. One person found this helpful.

PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

A Memoire (London 2009). Leslie Brent is a British professor emeritus, a renowned scientist in the field of immunology.

The stipulated topic of reflection is an attempt at following the identity project contained on the pages of Leslie Brent’s autobiographical texts, especially in his autobiography Sunday’s Child? A Memoire (London 2009). Leslie Brent is a British professor emeritus, a renowned scientist in the field of immunology

He, truly Sunday's child full of grace, emerged from his . Sunday's Child? A Memoir by Leslie Baruch Brent.

He, truly Sunday's child full of grace, emerged from his childhood as a survivor, an achiever, hard working, ambitious, athletic, capable of warm relationships, and successful both in his studies and extracurricular activities, despite a deep unhappiness about the uncertainty of the fate of his parents and sister. Brent recounts in his book the letter that Medawar sent to his first wife Joanne enclosing a sizable check to them both, and in this letter, Medawar acknowledges the enormous contribution of Leslie Brent And anyway it was his PhD thesis, not mine, that won the Prize.

Manuscript of German translation of travel diary hold by Leslie Baruch Brent during the first visit in Koszalin, kindly provided by the Author, archive of Miłosława yk.

Manuscript of German translation of travel diary hold by Leslie Baruch Brent during the first visit in Koszalin, kindly provided by the Author, archive of Miłosława yk. Brent, L. B. (2005, December). How I came to believe in miracles.

Publication Analysis. 4. sunday's child? 4. brent.

He, truly Sunday’s child full of grace, emerged from his childhood as a survivor, an achiever, hard working . cle{Morris2010SundaysCA, title {Sunday's child? A memoir by Leslie Baruch Brent.

He, truly Sunday’s child full of grace, emerged from his childhood as a survivor, an achiever, hard working, ambitious, athletic, capable of warm relationships, and successful both in his studies and extracurricular activities, despite a deep unhappiness about the uncertainty of the fate of his parents and sister. author {Jocelyn Morris and Peter John Turnbull Morris}, journal {Transplantation}, year {2010}, volume {89 3}, pages {. 267-9 } }. Jocelyn Morris, Peter John Turnbull Morris. Published in Transplantation 2010.

Served in British army during and after WWII. Autobiography: "Sunday's Child? A Memoir" (Bank House Books, 2009). Married, three children. Interests:music, books, sport (ex-hockey, squash & cricket playerand fell walker/climber, politics, chess.

Professor Leslie Baruch Brent (known in the scientific world as Leslie Brent) arrived in England late in 1938 in the first of the many Kindertransports.

Professor Leslie Baruch Brent (known in the scientific world as Leslie Brent) arrived in England late in 1938 in the first of the many Kindertransports. His German-Jewish family was among millions who were murdered by the Nazi regime. In 1943, at the tender age of eighteen, he volunteered for the armed forces, served in an infantry regiment, and was demobbed in 1947 with the rank of captain. Having studied zoology at the University of Birmingham he became an eminent immunologist in the field of tissue and organ transplantation. He was the junior member of a pioneering three-man team, led by Professor P.B. Medawar (they became known in the USA as 'the holy trinity'), which established and studied the phenomenon of 'immunological tolerance'. This vital discovery, which set up the 'holy grail' for clinical organ transplantation, is only now beginning to resonate clinically. It enabled them to transplant foreign tissues such as skin grafts without recourse to toxic drugs or to irradiation. The discovery led to the award of the 1960 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology to Medawar. Professor Brent's memoirs provide a fascinating and disarmingly frank account of his personal and professional life, and they include a vivid description of the state of British politics in the last quarter of the twentieth century, in which he played an active and leading role at local level. His well-researched and thought-provoking, yet even-handed reflections on some of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries - among them the Holocaust, the war years, the creation of the state of Israel and its consequences, his thoughts about France and its conduct under the Occupation, and the American-British attack on Iraq - reflect his passionate interest in the world around him, and they illuminate some of the most troubling events of our time.
  • This is an account of an interesting, varied and successful life. The author, was born Lothar Baruch in 1925 in Köslin, Pomerania (now Koszalin in Poland). There is an evocative picture of his childhood in a loving German middle-class, observant though not orthodox, Jewish family before the arrival of the Nazis, and then of the increasingly ominous years under Nazi rule. In 1938, his parents sent him, then aged 13, to England on a Kindertransport. They themselves and his sister stayed behind, and there are heart-rending copies of the sparse correspondence permitted to them until they were deported and murdered by the Nazis. He himself went to Bunce Court, a residential school for Jewish refugees, which became the nearest thing he had as a home, not only while he was resident there (thanks to the remarkable Anna Essinger and her dedicated and supportive staff, all refugees themselves), but for long afterwards. Bunce Court has evoked enormous loyalty and gratitude from its former pupils, for it helped these young people to cope with the catastrophic experiences of the loss of families and gave many of them the strength to build successful, and indeed often eminent lives. Brent himself is an example of this: he started in 1942, aged 16, as a lab assistant in Birmingham - a humble beginning to what would become a distinguished scientific career.

    In the following year, though an `enemy alien', he was able to volunteer to join the army, and was acting captain by the time he was demobilized. After the war he studied Zoology at Birmingham University. In 1951 Professor Medawar, whose area was immunology, invited him to join him as post-graduate student, and he became part
    of his research team of three at University College London. Medawar
    generously acknowledged Brent's contribution to the work which won him the Nobel Prize in 1960. In 1965 Brent became Professor of Zoology at Southampton University, and returned to London four years later to accept the Chair of Immunology at the St Mary's Hospital Medical School, which he held for the next 21 years until his retirement.

    His life was not only full of his scientific work (of which there is
    a quite detailed account), but of athleticism, mountaineering, choral singing, and local politics.

    He has a great capacity to make friends and to remain in touch with people at all stages in his life, and many of them are included in the book. Important as they are to him, they do not, with some notable exceptions, really come to life to those readers who did not know them. We also get detailed accounts of his holidays abroad, which are fine in a diary, but again may not be of general interest.

    Of more interest is the account, in the last third of the book, of his role in Haringey local politics, originally as a member of the Labour Party, then as a member of the SDP, and then as a Liberal Democrat. His views on the Falklands War, 9/11, the Iraq War and the Israel-Palestine issue - each preceded by a sketch of their history - are pretty standard for a Guardian reader, though of course none the less valid for that. The same is true of his deeply felt reflections about the Holocaust and of his musings, as a now non-religious Jew, about Jewish identity.

  • Brent interweaves personal history with scientific achievement. It doesn't always come off in such a way as to keep the reader's interest from wandering. Both Brent's personal life and his scientific career are fascinating, yet his writing leaves something to be desired. This reviewer wonders why, even though he was twice nominated by Medawar,he was not elected to the Royal Society(the equivalent of the Natl Academy of Science). His strong, pro-Palestinian views for someone who had little engagement with Israeli and Jewish causes is also a bit strange to fathom. Yet, there are lots of interesting tidbits of a highly intelligent and engaged person. This reader missed more info about his children and his interaction with them.

  • The author of this fascinating and immensely readable book, Leslie Baruch Brent, is a scientist, in fact one of the founding fathers of modern day immunology. He describes how he came to England in 1938 as a German-Jewish refugee on one of the Kindertransports, and how his education was completed at Bunce Court School established in Kent specifically for such displaced children. Service in the British Army, followed by a degree in Zoology and a PhD under the supervision of another eminent scientist, The Nobel Prize winner Sir Peter Medawar, are all vividly described - indeed these memoirs read more like a novel and are not just a collection of isolated chapters in an interesting life. The author's dedication to science (details of the discovery of immunological tolerance are made comprehensible to any intelligent layman), his engagement in humanitarian causes, local politics and the arts, in fact all that makes a person truly cultured, has clearly impacted considerably on his personal life. The manner and effect of this is described with great frankness and insight. We are given the author's opinions on a range of topics (vivisection and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to name but two) with which many rational-minded people would concur and which set out the arguments most lucidly. You will not regret buying this book.

  • From Kindertransport boy to Professor of Immunology: Sunday's Child is an unusual book, detailing the events of a highly unusual life. Few book titles can be more apt, in fact. Sunday's children are lucky, but Leslie Brent, born Lothar Baruch to Jewish parents in northern Germany in 1925, needed that luck more than most. At the age of 13 he found himself alone, in transit to Britain, never to see his parents or his sister again. (They were murdered by the Nazis in 1942.)

    Leslie Brent's book is a testament to an extraordinary capacity for survival - but not just in the bare sense of the word. His life has been full of achievement, in professional terms and in wider human terms. He has kept alive an astonishing number of friendships, and his wide range of interests would leave most people breathless: local politics in an ethnically mixed part of London, mountaineering, choral singing, and above all, an intense curiosity about life in all its aspects. All of this comes across very powerfully in this remarkable book.