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by Peter J. Bowler

ePub Charles Darwin (Blackwell Scientific Biographies) download
Author:
Peter J. Bowler
ISBN13:
978-0631168188
ISBN:
0631168184
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 1990)
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Subcategory:
Professionals & Academics
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1508 kb
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1314 kb
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Rating:
4.9
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963

In his biography of Charles Darwin, Peter Bowler dispels many of the . Bowler argues that Darwin's theory did not spark a scientific revolution which caused a majority of scientists to abandon their former views on natural history.

In his biography of Charles Darwin, Peter Bowler dispels many of the misconceptions surrounding Darwin's immediate influence on the scientific world. Bowler explains that Darwin was not the first naturalist to advance a theory of evolution. Most importantly, Bowler reveals that Darwin's theory was not accepted blindly by the scientific community

Peter J. Bowler FBA (born 8 October 1944) is a historian of biology who has written extensively on the history of evolutionary thought, the history of the environmental sciences, and on the history of genetics.

Peter J. Most importantly, Bowler reveals that Darwin's theory was not accepted blindly by the scientific community

Andrew Sinclair, Jack: A Biography of Jack London (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1978, £6·95).

Andrew Sinclair, Jack: A Biography of Jack London (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1978, £6·95). April 1979 · Journal of American Studies. Public Health and the State.

Volume 25 Issue 4. Peter J. Bowler

Volume 25 Issue 4. Bowler, English Français. The British Journal for the History of Science. Bowler, Charles Darwin: The Man and His Influence. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1990. Pp. xii + 250, illus. University of Lancaster.

Charles Robert Darwin, FRS FRGS FLS FZS (/ˈdɑːrwɪn/; 12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. His proposition that all species of life have. His proposition that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors is now widely accepted, and considered a foundational concept in science.

CHARLES DARWIN Bowler, P. Published by Basil Blackwell, Cambridge (1990).

Bowler, P. ISBN 10: 0631168184 ISBN 13: 9780631168188.

Bowler, Peter J. Publication date. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882, Evolution (Biology) - History, Naturalists - England - Biography, Evolution (Biology), Naturalists. Oxford, UK ; Cambridge, Mass. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

By: Bowler, Peter J. Material type: BookSeries: ( Cambridge science biographies . ISBN: 0521566681 (pbk). Distributer: Al-Ahram. Originally published: Oxford : Blackwell, 1990. Material type: BookSeries: ( Cambridge science biographies series). Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, . 990, 1996. 990, 1996Description: xii,250p. Subject(s): Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882 Biologists - Biography Evolution (Biology) EvolutionDDC classification: 57. 092 Catalogued by; Mahitab. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Biography Peter Bowler keeps a BA through the College or university of Cambridge . Darwin Deleted: Imagining a global Without Darwin (School of Chicago Press, 2013). Bowler (delivered 8 Oct 1944) can be a historian of biology that has created extensively on the annals of evolutionary idea, the annals of environmentally friendly sciences, and on the annals of genetics. Peter Bowler keeps a BA through the College or university of Cambridge, an MSc through the College or university of Sussex and a PhD through the College or university of Toronto. In the 1970s he trained at the institution of Humanities, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang.

Traces the life and work of the naturalist, focusing on the development of his evolutionary ideas, the controversy they created, and their continuing influence
  • Peter Bowler presents a synopsis of Charles Darwin's contributions to science, history, and culture. This book tries to provide a quick summary of the important periods in Darwin's life, touching briefly on each significant aspect.
    Much of the book is written in a somewhat technical way and is a bit too wordy. I had a difficult time maintaining my interest while I was reading some of the chapters. Certain areas deserved more coverage, like the reaction when Darwin went public with his theories.
    On the positive side, this book does give some good insight on Darwin's relationships with the other prominent scientists of his time and there are some moments where the slowness of the book becomes more interesting, like the section that covers Darwin's voyage of discovery aboard the Beagle. Overall, however, Bowler does not really present anything new or profound that we haven't heard before.

  • Charles Darwin obviously played a major role in the development of modern scientific thought and has become a multi-faceted mythical figure in terms of modern culture, competing with Christopher Columbus in the minds of many for the title of Dead White European Male who most contributed to the decline of Western Civilization in general and the American continent in particular. In "Charles Darwin: The Man and His Influence," Peter J. Bowler, who has written several books on the history of evolutionary theory including "Theories of Human Evolution" and "The Victorians and the Past," makes it clear that Darwin was not the first person to publish evolutionary ideas (not even in his own family) and emphasizes that his theory of natural selection was not generally accepted by his contemporaries. The publication of "The Origin of Species" not only stirred controversy and debate among both the scientific community and the general public, but it also reinforced the Victorian concept of progress. When Darwin died in 1882 and was buried in Westminster Abbey as a national hero of scientific discovery Victorian culture had undergone a major transformation.
    Bowler's look at Darwin's life and influence tries to explain how his contemporaries were unable to appreciate those aspects of this theories that are the ones we consider most important today. Ultimately, Darwin is seen as not only a product of his time but a person who transcended it by creating an idea that is still being explored by 21st-century scientists and intellectuals with beliefs and values very different from his own. Bowler shows us not only how Darwin reacted to contemporary ideas, at a time when science and the humanities were not seen as "two cultures," as well as how his ideas were received and adapated. Consequently, in addition to being a biography of a great man of science, it is also an examation of cultural history, which is perhaps the more important part of the effort. I had no problem following the scientific aspects and I never even took biology in high school, so I would think pretty much anybody can understand the arguments as well.
    The contents of "Charles Darwin: The Man and his Influence" is as follows: (1) The Problem of Interpretation, which looks at both the man and the myths that has arisen about him as well as the new perspectives on the rise of evolutionism; (2) Evolution before the "Origin of Species" looks at both radical evolutionism and the opponents of transmutation that defined the scientific debate at that time; (3) The Young Darwin covers his family and university life; (4) The Voyage of the "Beagle" details his famous trip to South America and across teh Pacific; (5) The Crucial Years: London, 1837-1842 is when Darwin developed his theory of natural selection; (6) The Years of Development at Down House is when Darwin was able to develop his theory in relative security; (7) Going Public presents the argument of the "Origin of Species"; (8) The Emergence of Darwinism deals less with Darwin than those that picked up his cause such as Alfred Russel Wallace and Thomas Henry Huxley; (9) The Opponents of Darwinism covers the response of those who espoused theistic evolutionism and the rise of Lamarckism; (10) Human Origins is about the "Descent of Man" and the idea of social evolutionism; and (11) Darwin and the Modern World looks at the death of Darwin and the rebirth of Darwinism after that point. The book is illustrated with photograph, cartoons and caricatures, and diagrams from Darwin's notebooks.
    The Cambridge Science Biographies are written by prominent international authorities in the history of science and are intended to be readily accessible to the general reader and student. While society depends upon science what scientists actually do remains a mystery to many people. Despite science usually being presetned dispassionately and impersonally, editor David Knight points out that "science is a human activity, and the personalities of those who practice it are integral to its process." Other volumes in this series are devoted to Galileo, Isaac Newton, Humphry Davy, Henry More, Antoine Lavoisier, and Andre-Marie Ampere. These scientists were chosen for their eminence and these biographies are intended to both illuminate the scientific process and to place the scientists in the social and intellectual context of their age.

  • In his biography of Charles Darwin, Peter Bowler dispels many of the misconceptions surrounding Darwin's immediate influence on the scientific world. Bowler argues that Darwin's theory did not spark a scientific revolution which caused a majority of scientists to abandon their former views on natural history. Bowler explains that Darwin was not the first naturalist to advance a theory of evolution. Most importantly, Bowler reveals that Darwin's theory was not accepted blindly by the scientific community. In fact, many of Darwin's most faithful supporters found scientific weaknesses in his theory. As Bowler states, "Darwin's greatest achievement was to force the majority of his contemporaries to reconsider their attitudes towards the basic idea of evolution" (p. 128).

    Bowler's book was the first biography I have read of Darwin, and I found it very enjoyable. It is one of the college books that I have kept. I definitely recommend it to any reader interested in Darwin's work and influence.

  • While you may not come away from this book feeling you would've called him Charlie, you will have derived a more than nodding acquaintance with an exceptional person. In the beginning -of the book- there seems to be an overemphasis on theological & philosophical issues but that is a clever construction that skillfully leads you to a profound grasp of Darwin's iconoclastic interpretations of mundane phenomena from which his theories grew. In the end, you regret even more never having met the man.