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ePub Skin Deep: Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All download

by Karol Griffin

ePub Skin Deep: Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All download
Author:
Karol Griffin
ISBN13:
978-0151008841
ISBN:
0151008841
Language:
Publisher:
Harcourt; First Edition first Printing edition (October 6, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Regional U.S.
ePub file:
1499 kb
Fb2 file:
1966 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi azw mobi
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
451

Believing herself a daughter of the West, Karol Griffin took the myths of the place-and of the outlaw-on faith.

Believing herself a daughter of the West, Karol Griffin took the myths of the place-and of the outlaw-on faith. When she walked into the Body Art Workshop in Laramie, Wyoming, she found what she was looking for: a culture on the fringe of polite society, complete with outlaw signature. Soon Karol was a full-time tattoo artist, an occasional outlaw, and a tattooed woman loo Believing herself a daughter of the West, Karol Griffin took the myths of the place-and of the outlaw-on faith.

Book Description Believing herself a daughter of the West, Karol Griffin took the myths of the place-and of the . Soon Karol was a full-time tattoo artist, an occasional outlaw, and a tattooed woman looking for love in all the wrong places

Book Description Believing herself a daughter of the West, Karol Griffin took the myths of the place-and of the outlaw-on faith. Soon Karol was a full-time tattoo artist, an occasional outlaw, and a tattooed woman looking for love in all the wrong places. By the mid nineties, the West had been invaded by suburban culture; and tattoos had become a mass commodity of coolness, compelling Karol to go even farther to find the authentic outsiders she romanticized.

Griffin's book is ultimately about how rebelling against her family led to a greater entanglement in a more dangerous . I have been rereading this book for ten years now, I just love it. Her style of writing is clear and concise but evokes fantastic imagery.

Griffin's book is ultimately about how rebelling against her family led to a greater entanglement in a more dangerous dysfunction. Certain passages are permanently etched into my brain because they are either so beautiful or so tragic. I identify with Karol's attitude and outlook on her life. She seemed like an old soul, or maybe just a weathered soul due to her circumstances.

Skin Deep : Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All.

By (author) Karol Griffin.

When Karol Griffin was fifteen, she was traveling west with her parents through Canada. I looked down at the tattoo machine I was holding, and my hand felt like it belonged to someone else, cold and distant. They stopped at a gas station in Kamloops, and she saw a man resting on a "long, low chopper. Her heart stopped: "He was a wild, magical man. A creature. It might have been his lanky legs "poured into tight black jeans," but it was more probably a tattooed snake that. Before long, I was lost in the sensation, and the vibrations from the machine sang along the nerves of my hand and flickered up the insides of my wrists," she concludes.

Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All.

book by Karol Griffin. Skin Deep: Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All. by Karol Griffin. more aw, and a tattooed woman looking for love in all the wrong places.

Предметы: SKIN Deep: Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men & My Deep Love for Them All (Book), GRIFFIN, Karol, SOCIAL sciences, NONFICTION. Добавить в избранное. SKIN DEEP: Tattoos, The Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All (Book).

We asked Karol Griffin, tattoo artist and author of Skin Deep: Tattoos, the Disappearing West, Very Bad Men, and My Deep Love for Them All, to explain the divas behind the designs. FRONT HIP What it means: "What you see is what you get," says Griffin. If she's marked up front, she's not too worried about stretch marks, pregnancy, or even the gravitational pull of the earth as she ascends into middle age. Meaning, this girl is the ideal candidate for a no-strings hookup.

Believing herself a daughter of the West, Karol Griffin took the myths of the place-and of the outlaw-on faith. When she walked into the Body Art Workshop in Laramie, Wyoming, she found what she was looking for: a culture on the fringe of polite society, complete with outlaw signature. Soon Karol was a full-time tattoo artist, an occasional outlaw, and a tattooed woman looking for love in all the wrong places. By the mid nineties, the West had been invaded by suburban culture; and tattoos had become a mass commodity of coolness, compelling Karol to go even farther to find the authentic outsiders she romanticized. She eventually hooked up with a real old-fashioned Wyoming outlaw, complete with felony convictions and out-standing warrants-which is how Karol wound up looking down the barrel of a gun held by a tattooed caricature of true love.
  • I have been rereading this book for ten years now, I just love it. Her style of writing is clear and concise but evokes fantastic imagery. Certain passages are permanently etched into my brain because they are either so beautiful or so tragic. I identify with Karol's attitude and outlook on her life. She seemed like an old soul, or maybe just a weathered soul due to her circumstances. She took on whatever was thrown her way with a calm, determined spirit. Was so sad when Slade called me in 2010 to tell me she had passed. Hope to see her in heaven someday.

  • The writing style is clean, clear and linear. It makes for a great weekend read. The stories are an appropriate blend of funny and tragic, and I like the non-fiction weaving of info about Wyoming, the West, tats, etc.
    I would have liked to see a little more introspection, for example, what went through her head and heart when Rick died? Also, I like a little more of a unique and personal writing style. (Not like Toni Morrison unique, but something that sets someone apart.)
    All in all, a good book.

  • This will not be one of those books that goes down in history as one of the great literary works but i thought it is a pretty good read covering the memoirs of the author who lives in laramie wyoming and works various jobs and eventually befriends the local tattoo artist and they develop along friendship which eventually leads to apprenticeship and eventually her own shop.
    Along the way it also follows her relationships (failed)with different who fall into different catorgories of outlaws.She also follow how people come form big city america to places like laramie with fantasys of how the west should be and giving these reason why they move to these places only to make changes to make them like places they have left.This tyed with how people have done kind of the same thing with tattoos now being so main stream and in thing todo.
    I thought the description of the tattooing process and the going through apprenticeship were very thourgh even for someone who has never been in a tattoo shop before.Thought it was really cool that she got her [body part] pierced at a shop in denver ....Give this book a try ieven if tattoos are not of real interest to you i think you'll like it

  • I found this book on a remainder table at Stanford. Thought it would be fun. Turned out to be compelling, hard to put down, especially after being hooked in by the author's, er, "relationship" problems in the opening chapter. Spurning "traditional values," she falls prey to the romanticized ideal of a "Western outlaw" life and men to her regret with that last relationship. Overall a gripping memoir. I found amusing that "the counter-culture girl" couldn't cut it in SF's Mission District, the haven of SF counter-culture types. Perhaps as she raises her child she'll learn that there are a thousand gray areas between "boring" and "outlaw"...and there is a reason outlaws are outlaws!

  • Karol Griffin? If you only knew her from this book, you'd think: Great writer, awful attitude problem.
    If you've ever gotten a tattoo or piercing, you know that the Gods of Body Mod can be, shall we say, a little snotty. If you're not the "right" kind of client, you get icy treatment. I made the cut, as it were (I had 25 piercings by 1991, and back then, maaaan, that gave me The Cred), but I always hated hated hated that McOutlaw audition process you had to go through. "Are you a non-conformist just like us? Well, okay then! If not...hmph."
    Griffin drips contempt for every deb, dude, novice, suburbanite, sorority girl, or otherwise non-hipster damaged person who crosses her path, and who crosses the threshold of the tat shop. Mix that with her hue and cry over the corruption of the West (oh GOD, that cliche again?) *and* the corruption of the sanctity of tattooing and you've got a great writer who you can't stand! Shame. She's got some real chops.
    Only in the afterword does she a) pretty much confess that she herself is a whitebread exile in the McOutlaw world or b) show any thoughtfulness and generosity toward others regarding external markers and what they mean about identity (she finally realizes they don't mean much at all. welcome to adulthood, dollface.)
    It's savagely ironic for someone who sells their tattoo skills to whine about the increasing popularity of tattooing. If you want to stay pure, stay out of the marketplace and stay in your tidy, kooler than thou bubble. It'll be lonely as hell, but at least you'll be assured that everyone around you meets your exacting alterna-snob standard.
    Her use of language is fun and alive, but what she's choosing to communicate is petty and ugly and, frankly, about as tired as a tribal tat on the lower back.

  • The last three people who posted reviews didn't bother to read the book first. At least I did my homework. I usually dont like nonfiction accounts of peoples lives but I found this to be a very interesting book. This writer seems sincere in her desire to tell her lifes story as a tattoo artist. It appears she got the bad end of the stick a time or two even though she brought a lot of it on herself. Though I can't figure out if this chick is for real or a poser, that doesn't really matter. The book was well written and she comes off as a person trying to make some sense of her nonconventional life, mistakes and all and she should be respected for her candidness.

  • This book is fabulous.
    Karol describes her life, her town, and her art with a passionate voice. She truly believes in what she did and whom she loved, and her genuine feeling pulls the reader in- I meant to read just a page or two before bed, and stayed up half the night to finish it.
    Since I live in Laramie, Wyoming, I feel a special connection to her work and see how funny her honesty really is. Her description of a gay couple, tattooed �master� and �slave� and bedecked in full rodeo finery, as appearing to tourists to be the most authentic cowboys in town was particularly astute- I laughed out loud.
    There is enough love, heartbreak, reality, art, and emotional depth here for several books, let alone just one. If you read it, you won�t be disappointed.