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ePub I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir download

by Jennifer Finney Boylan

ePub I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir download
Author:
Jennifer Finney Boylan
ISBN13:
978-0767921749
ISBN:
0767921747
Language:
Publisher:
Broadway (January 15, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Regional U.S.
ePub file:
1806 kb
Fb2 file:
1382 kb
Other formats:
azw txt lit doc
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
206

I'm Looking Through You book. For Jennifer Boylan, creaking stairs, fleeting images in the mirror, and the remote whisper of human voices were everyday events in the Pennsylvania house in which she grew up in the 1970s.

I'm Looking Through You book. But these weren't the only specters beneath the roof of the mansion known as the "Coffin House. Jenny herself-born James-lived in a haunted body, and both her mysterious, diffident father and her wild, unpredictable sister would soon become ghosts to Jenny as well.

Аудиокнига "I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir", Jennifer Finney Boylan. Читает Jennifer Finney Boylan. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы

Аудиокнига "I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir", Jennifer Finney Boylan. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

I’m Looking Through You is an engagingly candid investigation of what it means to be haunted.

I’m Looking Through You is an engagingly candid investigation of what it means to be haunted. Looking back on the spirits who invaded her family home, Boylan launches a full investigation with the help of a group of earnest, if questionable, ghostbusters. Boylan also examines the ways we find connections between the people we once were and the people we become. With wit and eloquence, Boylan shows us how love, forgiveness, and humor help us find peace-with our ghosts, with our loved ones, and with the uncanny boundaries, real and imagined, between men and women. Jennifer Finney Boylan.

Jenny Boylan’s I’m Looking Through You ranks right up there with Mary Karr’s The Liar’s Club and Tobias . Boylan is a fiction writer turned memoirist and a professor at Colby College.

Jenny Boylan’s I’m Looking Through You ranks right up there with Mary Karr’s The Liar’s Club and Tobias Wolff’s This Boy’s Life as one of the finest literary memoirs of the last several decades. Like these, it’s a haunting revelation of the human heart, its terrible longings, its fears and joys, the secret recesses where we most truly dwell. How alike we all are, down this deep. I couldn't put it down. I gave it to a colleague who had the same experience.

For Jennifer Boylan, creaking stairs, fleeting images in the mirror, and remote whispers were everyday events in the .

For Jennifer Boylan, creaking stairs, fleeting images in the mirror, and remote whispers were everyday events in the Pennsylvania house she grew up in. Bu. .We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

At first glance I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir seems to be about growing up in a.

At first glance I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir seems to be about growing up in a haunted house, but it's much more than that. Author Jennifer Finney Boylan uses the near-translucent spirits inhabiting her family home as a metaphor for her dissociated youth. She spent her first 40 years as James Boylan, the boy's and man's body a bad fit for her soul. The Boylan family moved to the aptly named "Coffin House" on Philadelphia's Main Line, and at once young James began to observe ghostly shapes drifting through the rooms.

I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: a Memoir Boylan also examines the ways we find connections between the people w.

I'm Looking Through You: Growing Up Haunted: a Memoir. Written by Jennifer Finney Boylan. Narrated by Jennifer Finney Boylan. I'm Looking Through You is an engagingly candid investigation into what it means to be "haunted.

Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir. By Jennifer Finney Boylan. Jenny Boylan’s I’m Looking Through You ranks right up there with Mary Karr’s The Liar’s Club and Tobias Wolff’s This Boy’s Life as one of the finest literary memoirs of the last several decades. Category: Biography & Memoir Philosophy Psychology. Richard Russo, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Empire Falls.

Автор: Boylan Jennifer Finney Название: I& Looking Through You . His story recalls a golden era for England, and in this book Finney looks back at this time and at football today.

Im Looking Through You is an engagingly candid investigation of what it means to be haunted.

From the bestselling author of She’s Not There comes another buoyant, unforgettable memoir—I’m Looking Through You is about growing up in a haunted house...and making peace with the ghosts that dwell in our hearts.For Jennifer Boylan, creaking stairs, fleeting images in the mirror, and the remote whisper of human voices were everyday events in the Pennsylvania house in which she grew up in the 1970s. But these weren’t the only specters beneath the roof of the mansion known as the “Coffin House.” Jenny herself—born James—lived in a haunted body, and both her mysterious, diffident father and her wild, unpredictable sister would soon become ghosts to Jenny as well.I’m Looking Through You is an engagingly candid investigation of what it means to be “haunted.” Looking back on the spirits who invaded her family home, Boylan launches a full investigation with the help of a group of earnest, if questionable, ghostbusters. Boylan also examines the ways we find connections between the people we once were and the people we become. With wit and eloquence, Boylan shows us how love, forgiveness, and humor help us find peace—with our ghosts, with our loved ones, and with the uncanny boundaries, real and imagined, between men and women.

  • In fact, it could be argued the combination exceeds the sum of its parts. Like chocolate and peanut butter. ....of literature. Boylan has always been a gifted storyteller, and this is yet another demonstration. While covering similar ground to 'She's not there', it's still quite fresh, funny, touching, and at times heartbreakingly poignant. If I had to succinctly tweet a review, I guess I'd simply say "It's got .....pizazz."
    BTW: I got the companion audible copy, read ...no... PERFORMED by the author. She's as talented a spoken word artist as she is a writer. I highly recommend the companion audible version too.
    Kudos, Jenny. And thanks for writing.

  • I bought this as an audiobook which I played in my car to and from work for a week. The author reads her own work and, honestly, does a fabulous job of it. Jennifer Boylan has a natural reading style that makes the stories of her, her family and her transition from male to female come alive in the ear. It helps, too, that this is an engaging book, more revelatory about her sex-change in many ways than her first memoir, SHE'S NOT THERE.

    What Boylan displays in I'M LOOKING THROUGH YOU is a crackerjack sense of humor, a flair for descriptive passages that ring true, and a complete avoidance of self-pity regarding the less pleasant moments in her life. Chief among the latter is the total estrangement from her older sister Lydia following her transition (The sister's words to Jennifer were, "It would have been better if you had died.") which, considering that Jennifer's much more conservative mother welcomed her now-daughter with open arms, seems both inexplicable and heartbreaking. But Boylan chooses to concentrate on what life had been like with Lydia prior to that break, illuminating the convoluted qualities of their relationship and letting readers draw their own conclusions. Her stories and anecdotes about life with her father, who did not live to see her transition, are equally revealing. Along with the connecting narrative of growing up in what she describes as a haunted house, Boylan makes clear that the other ghosts----of her dead father and her estranged sister, of her eccentric grandmother and, certainly, of her former male self----helped form the person she is today.

    I recommend the audio version of this book, but however you read or listen to I'M LOOKING THROUGH YOU, you'll be rewarded with a story of growth and loss that will stay with you long after you're done.

  • Jennifer Finney Boylan in I'M LOOKING THROUGH YOU: GROWING UP HAUNTED, her second book to discuss her transformation from James to Jennifer, has much going for it. Since Ms. Boylan is a professor of English at Colby College and the author of several novels, we would expect that she is fluent in the language. And that she is. Her prose is as transparent and effortless as a stream in Maine, the state she and her family call home. Her wonderful sense of humor will grab you immediately. Case in point: "What am I doing here with a gin and tonic and a [...]?" At one point she opines that her sense of humor may have kept her sane in her anything-but-conventional life. The cast of characters is usually both entertaining and compelling; many of them surely could be subjects of short stories.

    In a recent radio interview I heard Ms. Boyan, without whining, discussing the difficulties that she has faced in the world of the transgendered. While she dwells less on the topic in this memoir than in her previous book, SHE IS NOT THERE: A LIFE IN TWO GENDERS, she does rue the fact that she too often has to explain herself to and educate the gawking public about this world, something that a lot of us who are different from the great washed majority have long since become tired of doing.

    What comes through on every page of this book is that Ms. Boylan is a remarkable woman and the most decent of people. I am convinced that I would like her on sight and would love to audit one of her English classes. She is far too kind to her sister Lydia (the book is dedicated to her sister) who has refused to ever see her again and demands that when she visits their mother that portraits of James/Jennifer must be removed from her mother's home and that Jennifer's name cannot be mentioned. Lydia needs to get over herself and/or stay in Scotland. Her mother should inform her that she does not remove photographs of anybody for her or anyone else.

    Ms. Boylan says in the introduction that this book is a memoir. We'll just have to accept this-- at least recent ones-- as a new genre somewhere between fiction and non-fiction. She is obviously the godchild of Frank McCourt whom she refers to in the introduction-- who wrote dozens of pages of dialogue in ANGELA'S ASHES that supposedly took place while he was a child under the age of six, a feat that stretches credibility to say the least. This writer convinces us, however, that she has caught the essence of what happened to her. I for one, whether events happened exactly as she writes of them or not, would not have missed her account of the decorating of the Christmas tree with ornaments with each family member's names on them, as well as extended family and a special place on the tree for deceased pets known as the "Pet Cemetery."

    This book should go a long way in convincing us that we are all in this together and we are more alike than different.

  • There is something about Jennifer Boylan's writing that keeps me engaged beyond the content on the page. Boylan is a fiction writer turned memoirist and a professor at Colby College. My first Boylan book was She's Not There, an account of how she dealt with being transgendered. I couldn't put it down. I gave it to a colleague who had the same experience. This book addresses some of the same issues as She's Not There, as well as the unreliability of memory and the psychological dimensions of haunting and of feeling haunted. In subtle ways, Boylan makes you think about things like legacy and relationship, but obliquely, as if she is experimenting with fictionalizing her life experience. Both books make me want to read her earlier fiction and other work.

  • Buy all three books. You won't want to put them down. These need to be combined and made into a movie so the general public could be educated.
    It's totally eye opening to someone who is dealing with a loved one who is going through this.
    Hey Jennifer, maybe you could write a movie script. Let me know if you do.

  • This refers to the gender theme of the others only slightly. I at first I was concerned that the banner wasn't waved, the torch had dimmed, I realized that I was seeing the work of an adult woman and I was heartened. As my own transition progresses I can understand her femininity. I truly appreciate my own.