mostraligabue
» » Trust No One: The Secret World of Sidney Reilly

ePub Trust No One: The Secret World of Sidney Reilly download

by Richard B. Spence

ePub Trust No One: The Secret World of Sidney Reilly download
Author:
Richard B. Spence
ISBN13:
978-0922915798
ISBN:
0922915792
Language:
Publisher:
Feral House (November 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Specific Groups
ePub file:
1651 kb
Fb2 file:
1907 kb
Other formats:
azw lit txt rtf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
463

Sidney Reilly had to have been one of them

Master spy was the basis for the James Bond character. Sidney Reilly had to have been one of them. That was a fun program and a fair introduction. The real biography is several kinds of extreme There are several claimants to the title of inspirations for Ian Flemings' James Bond.

Trust No One's superbly footnoted telling of the double-dealing and always self-serving "service" of Sidney Reilly as. .

Trust No One's superbly footnoted telling of the double-dealing and always self-serving "service" of Sidney Reilly as a British agent convinced me that it is the best book on the life of the spy whose exploits exceeded those of the imaginary James Bond character. The result is an exhaustive (and exhausting) compilation of Sidney Reilly's activities and associations over the course of his career.

Richard Spence, a professor of history, watched that series when it aired . It was in England that Rosenblum took the name of Sidney Reilly, one of many aliases he would adopt.

Richard Spence, a professor of history, watched that series when it aired, and was fascinated. He decided to investigate the facts of Reilly’s life for himself. Spence has carefully combed the surviving records, and appears to have come closer than anyone to solving the mystery of Reilly’s origins and early life. He was probably born Salomon Rosenblum somewhere in Russian Poland in 1874. He began using what he called The System.

Sidney Reilly had to have been one of them

Master spy was the basis for the James Bond character. The real biography is several kinds There are several claimants to the title of inspirations for Ian Flemings' James Bond.

Sidney Reilly remains one of the most elusive figures of the last century

Sidney Reilly remains one of the most elusive figures of the last century. He used a variety of disguises from South American cook to German high officer to build his legend in the underworld of international intrigue. Historian Richard Spence draws on photographs, illustrations, and uncovered records from British, Russian, and American intelligence sources to create a powerful portrait of a man who was feared by friend and enemy alike

A window into the pre and post-W.

Historian Richard Spence draws on photos, illustrations, and uncovered records from British, Russian, and American intelligence sources to.

Historian Richard Spence draws on photos, illustrations, and uncovered records from British, Russian, and American intelligence sources to create a powerful portrait of a man who was feared by friend and enemy alike. The dramatic true-life tale of this 20th-century master spy and consummate criminal was the subject of the acclaimed PBS series "Reilly: Ace of Spies" starring Sam Neill. 2 people like this topic.

Author Richard B. Spence can be seen on various documentaries on the History Channel and is a consultant for Washington, DC’s International Spy Museum. He is also the author of Trust No One: The Secret World of Sidney Reilly (Feral House). Biographies Scientists. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Master spy was the basis for the James Bond character.
  • Very interesting and very detailed. Tremendous scholarship and detection. It may not be "fun"; but then it isn't supposed to be. The author's introduction was the mini-series; whereas I read the book first. We were both intrigued from the start. I am about 100 pages in and the very first thing I realized is that I will probably go back through it again with pen and paper, or more probably FreeMind, close at hand so I can try to follow all of the twists, crosses, double-crosses and "co-incidences" that the author has uncovered. Triple agent? More like a dodeca-agent! And far from his being unique in that; it seems to have been the rule rather than the exception.

  • It is obvious that Richard Spence is a diligent researcher and he did a great deal of homework for this book. The result is an exhaustive (and exhausting) compilation of Sidney Reilly's activities and associations over the course of his career. Unfortunately this wealth of information is not really drawn into any themes or any kind of coherent narrative. Some of the "Reilly myths" are convincingly de-bunked, but there's not much on offer here to replace them. This might be a helpful work for the history scholar looking for names, dates, and places associated with Sidney Reilly but it isn't much fun for the armchair history buff.

  • Arguably the best account of the formidable spy.

  • Very detailed biography.

  • As a young adult I saw Riley Ace of Spies a BBC-Thames production on Boston public television in 1983 it was a long series of hour long episodes. This book Trust No One The Secret World of Sidney Reilly describes this mysterious Eastern European man as one of the most influential British inteligence agents of the 20th century. He was at the ground floor of oil exploration in Baku Russa Georgia Republic of Russia. He was involved in some interesting aspects of the Russian Revolution. This man is such a mystery that even the author who has done far and away better job of researching and providing documentation as to who this man was and what part he played in the early days of British Military Inteligence what is supprising is that he knew Alistar Crowley (Brisish Occultist and British Inteligence agent who was kept a secret through two world wars he was the most outspoken man in British History- I am not interested in the Occult but did buy the book Special Agent by the same author and was suprised to learn that both men worked together on rare occasion but that is even plausibly deniable as British Inteligence would like it.

    This man is a gifted author I wish the BBC would buy the rights to remake this book into a movie truly facinating story and its true.

  • I found this book very interesting and informative. My only criticism is that it, at times, seems little more than a list of all the important people that Sidney Riley knew. He apparently knew thousands of the most important people in the world around 1900. The other thing, not really a criticism, is that the author seems prone to attribute to Riley things that he likely did not do, but might have. I, as a reader, might enjoy making those speculations, which are indeed possible, but for some reason I find that having the author make them for me is less pleasurable. I recommend this book for history buffs especially interested in that era, pre/post WW1.

  • I bought this after watching the BBC miniseries on Sidney Reilly. Spence has produced a very scholarly book written in a friendly tone. While I still view the Ace of Spies (the series, not the man) with affection and admiration, this book demonstrates that Reilly's life was much more complex than the BBC series made out. While not wanting to give too much away, I'll just say, watch the series, then read the book.

  • Oh dear. This guy has read about 27 too many Russian novels.

    The author sifted through a sea of jumbled information about one of the craftiest characters in the long history of espionage, and produced, well, another sea of jumbled information. After three paragraphs in any chapter, it's not clear what or whom he's talking about -- or even why.

    Less detail and more careful analysis and supposition would have been MOST helpful, thank you.

    I'm about to stop reading, give up, and stick with the TV series.