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ePub Story of My Life: The Autobiography of George Sand (SUNY series, Women Writers in Translation) download

by Thelma Jurgrau,Walter D. Gray,George Sand

ePub Story of My Life: The Autobiography of George Sand (SUNY series, Women Writers in Translation) download
Author:
Thelma Jurgrau,Walter D. Gray,George Sand
ISBN13:
978-0791405819
ISBN:
0791405818
Language:
Publisher:
SUNY Press (July 3, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Specific Groups
ePub file:
1108 kb
Fb2 file:
1253 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
971

George Sand’s Story of My Life is much more than the autobiography of an extraordinary woman, although it is. .I have been studying George Sand for a few years now, mostly by translating her letters. There are over 10,000 of them.

George Sand’s Story of My Life is much more than the autobiography of an extraordinary woman, although it is surely also that. It is the story of a century of French history as lived through the experiences and fates of three generations, the tumultuous history of the birth of modern France and the transformation of a society. The translation of Sand’s Story is excellent. Coordinated by Thelma Jurgrau, the group of translators has given us a direct sense of the text: its flow, its variety, its quality. This is an unusual feat and a felicitous outcome.

Series: SUNY Series, Women Writers in Translation. File: PDF, . 9 MB. Читать онлайн. Both sets of notes follow the text of Story of My Life. As stated, being privy to a variety of translations of a work by a single author is problematic, but the very spectrum of translations becomes advantageous.

Great scholarship and skill by all involved.

This book is more than the autobiography of an extraordinary woman. Thelma Jurgrau teaches literature and writing at the State University of New York, Empire State College. It is also the story of a century of French history as lived through the experiences and fates of three generations, the tumultuous history of the birth of modern France and the transformation of a society.

Story of My Life book. This book is more than the autobiography of an extraordinary woman. This translation of George Sand’s autobiography by Dan Hofstadter is divided into three parts.

SUNY Press - Biography & Autobiography - 1162 pages. She has translated many works of George Sand for journals and other publications. Bibliographic information. Story of My Life: The Autobiography of George Sand SUNY series, Women Writers in Translation.

Story of My Life: The Autobiography of George Sand (Suny Series, Women Writers in Translation) .

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Portrait of George Sand at 34 by Auguste Charpentier, 1838 "Simplicity is the most difficult thing to secure in this world; Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, best known by her pseudonym George Sand, was a French novelist and memoirist. George Sand, aka re Dupin, who facilitated Lola's romance with Henri Dujarier.

Histoire de ma vie is an autobiography by George Sand covering her life up to shortly before the Revolution of 1848. The autobiography was published in Paris in 1854 and 1855 by Victor Lecou. George Sand had planned as early as 1835, shortly after the end of her relationship with Alfred de Musset, to write her memoirs. She started in April 1847 and, with many interruptions for other work, finished her memoirs in 1855.

Suny Series, Women Writers in Translation. State University of New York Press. long but very interesting, gives a view of France round 1800. a curious book, it takes the writer 400 pages to reach her 4th birthday. jaapberk, April 20, 2009.

George Sand - 50 Women Who Changed The World. A look at some of the most influential women through history. Her life perhaps even more dramatic and interesting than her books. A great biography of writer George Sand. Fransk Historie Albert Camus Fremragende Bøger Romerbrevet Gode Bøger Forfattere Hobbyer Play Bøger. Story of My Life: The Autobiography of George Sand (Suny Series, Women Writers in Translation) by George Sand.

Editor's Foreword

Critical Introduction

Historical Introduction

Story of My Life

Author's Notes

Editor's Notes

Name Index

  • I was a bit amused to see that the reviews here dealt with the subject matter rather than the translation and presentation. I have been studying George Sand for a few years now, mostly by translating her letters. There are over 10,000 of them. Fortunately I am only really worried about the letters that mention Chopin, for now, which narrows it down to a few hundred (many of which are 1000 words or longer). Even after all this time focused on Sand, I have not read this book all the way through, even though it was the first Sand book I bought.

    I will read the whole book eventually, and I have already read very long portions of it, but I don't know if I would recommend treating this book like something you should read from cover to cover all at once, unless you are an incredibly patient person who is very interested in Sand's life. Think of it more as a reference book, or a collection of short stories. If you have an interest in one particular aspect of Sand's life, then you can read about that bit and put it down. Or you can read about that bit, and then maybe flip through her chapter headings for anything else that looks interesting. In the old style, each chapter has several chapter headings which give you a good idea of what is discussed in that chapter, and since Sand wrote in installments, it's very natural to read chapters out of order. One does not always lead to the next.

    Without this translation, Sand's life in her own words would be unattainable for anyone who doesn't read French. I don't believe (though I could be wrong) that it has been translated into any other language. I am extremely grateful that the translation team took on this project. I am learning French the hard way, but when I was just starting out, the accessibility of this book made my goals seems more realistic.

    If you are, like me, interested in Sand because of Chopin, be warned that she does not write much about him in this book. The first mention of his name in the narrative is on page 1073 (the narrative ends on page 1117). She conceived of this project when her relationship with Chopin was ending, and she ends the book with her relationship with Chopin. If you want to read her words on Chopin, read her letters. They have not been translated into English as a whole, but there is one old biography by André Maurois (Lélia) which has been translated into English, and I think he quotes more from her letters than any English-language biographer I've read.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that Sand got paid like all the other Romantic writers: by the word, or by the installment. She wrote her mémoires to make money, the same reason she wrote everything else. The sooner she finished writing it, the sooner she had to come up with something else to write. Which is not to say that she did not write other things in the meantime, but the mémoires were a steady source of income. If 19th century writers had editors like modern writers, then these mémoires would not have been nearly as long. But since they were not edited then, they should not be abridged now. Every word Sand wrote has historical value; it is a glut of information, but I am very happy to have it.

  • Love this book - read it cover-to-cover and wrote a book based on it - would strongly recommend it for any scholar or reader interested in George Sand.

  • ... as well as not enough. When I told a friend that I had read George Sand's 1100 page autobiography, he replied with the subject quote. And I would certainly agree. How many other autobiographies are this long? And stop in mid-life? There is a "Doppler shift" to her story, consider that the first 375 pages cover her ancestors before she is born in 1804, and the story ends around 1840, with another 36 years of her life uncovered. The first part of the book is far too many letters, printed in their entirety, of her ancestors.

    Her father was of "noble" birth, had been with Napoleon at Marengo, and tragically died in a horse riding accident in 1808. She had an unhappy relationship with her mother, of more common birth, and was eventually placed in a convent, whose time she remembers fondly. She married - a conventional "escape", but a loveless choice - in 1822, and had two children, Maurice and Solange.

    She was one of the true "giants" of the 19th Century, a woman who was famous for defying (some) social conventions, notoriously dressing as a man for the freedom. She was a prolific writer, with numerous novels and plays to her credit. She loved her "home country" of Nohant, in the Berry. And she dazzled, perhaps not so much by her physical beauty, which has been questioned, but by her intellect. She was lovers with at least Alfred de Musset and Chopin, and for the later she wrote a novel about her winter in Majorca with him. She also developed at least friendships with Franz Listz, Eugene Delacroix, Ivan Turgenev, Balzac, Flaubert, and Stendhal. She also had here detractors, a contemporary, Charles Baudiere, and much later, Simone de Beauvoir was quite critical. Her novel "Francois Le Champi" was placed in Proust's "Swan's Way."

    It is indeed a very long slog to reach the end, but there are nuggets of insight along the way. For example, on page 794 she comments on the prohibitions against suicide but reflects on the actions of "martyrs" who essential hasten their own death. On 1010, there is: "But it is also true that the wish--nay, divine law--of Providence is transgressed every time a man and woman join their lips without uniting their hearts and minds." Despite these, my central criticism is that her story lacked introspection - what were her true feelings, particularly concerning the galaxy of "stars" that she knew? No doubt she was conforming with some of the conventions of her age by being reticent in expressing them, but we are all the poorer for it. Her "style" approaches far too many Christmas letters I receive: we went there, did that, but no personal thoughts or transformations.

    I've been fortunate to visit her home in Nohant on a couple occasions. In the very heart of France, in her modest chateau, it is possible to imagine her life there in the 19th Century. The pine trees, one for each child, which she planted upon their birth, still grow in the garden. They have the table set for dinner, with name tags for the famous visitors. And there is the small theater within the house for performances. And her grave is nearby. Overall, reading "Indiana," and visiting her home might give you a better feel for her life than these 1100 pages.