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ePub Emma download

by Howard Zinn

ePub Emma download
Author:
Howard Zinn
ISBN13:
978-0896086647
ISBN:
089608664X
Language:
Publisher:
South End Press (September 1, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Specific Groups
ePub file:
1101 kb
Fb2 file:
1337 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf txt azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
870

Howard Zinn (August 24, 1922 – January 27, 2010) was an American historian, playwright, and socialist thinker. He was chair of the history and social sciences department at Spelman College, and a political science professor at Boston University

Howard Zinn (August 24, 1922 – January 27, 2010) was an American historian, playwright, and socialist thinker. He was chair of the history and social sciences department at Spelman College, and a political science professor at Boston University. Zinn wrote over 20 books, including his best-selling and influential A People's History of the United States. In 2007, he published a version of it for younger readers, A Young People's History of the United States.

So, thank you, Howard Zinn for resurrecting Emma into play form. But let's be clear: Howard Zinn is not a playwright (although a stunning historian), and this is not a very good play. It's quite didactic, relatively undramatic, and long. Basically, Howard Zinn took a history book and put it into play form, without changing the style. So, a mixed bag altogether. It's an important play, because there's not really any other play about her, but let's just say, I hope someone writes a better one soon.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In this play, historian and playwright Howard Zinn dramatizes the life of Emma Goldman, the anarchist, feminist, and free-spirited thinker who was exiled from the United States because of her outspoken views, including her opposition to WWI. With his wit and ability to illuminate history from below, Zinn reveals the life of this remarkable woman.

In this play, historian and playwright Howard Zinn dramatizes the life of Emma Goldman, the anarchist, feminist, and free-spirited thinkerwho was exiled from the United States because of her outspoken views, including her opposition.

In this play, historian and playwright Howard Zinn dramatizes the life of Emma Goldman, the anarchist, feminist, and free-spirited thinkerwho was exiled from the United States because of her outspoken views, including her opposition to WWI. A play in two acts about Emma Goldman, American Anarchist.

Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States, tells his personal stories about more than thirty years of fighting for social change, from teaching at Spelman College to. .A former bombardier in WWII, Zinn emer.

Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States, tells his personal stories about more than thirty years of fighting for social change, from teaching at Spelman College to recent protests against war. Declarations of Independence: Cross-Examining American Ideology. The acclaimed author of "A People's History of the United States" (more than 200,000 copies sold) presents an honest and piercing look at American political ideology

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Global Values 101: A Short Course with Howard Zinn, Amy Goodman, Naomi Klein, Robert Reich, Juliet Schor, Katha Pollitt, Paul Farmer, Lani Guinier, and others.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free.

In this play, historian and playwright Howard Zinn dramatizes the life of Emma Goldman, the anarchist, feminist, and free-spirited thinker who was exiled from the United States because of her outspoken views, including her opposition to World War I.

With his wit and unique ability to illuminate history from below, Zinn reveals the life of this remarkable woman. As Zinn writes in his Introduction, Emma Godman "seemed to be tireless as she traveled the country, lecturing to large audiences everywhere, on birth control ("A woman should decide for herself"), on the falsity of marriage as an institution ("Marriage has nothing to do with love"), on patriotism ("the last refuge of a scoundrel") on free love ("What is love if not free?") and also on the drama, including Shaw, Ibsen, and Strindberg. This book will be of immense interest to feminists, American historians, and people interested in the long history of resistance and protest in the United States.

Howard Zinn is professor emeritus at Boston University. He is the author of the classic A People’s History of the United States. A television adaptation of the book is currently being co-produced by Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, and Chris Moore for HBO. Zinn has received the Lannan Foundation Literary Award for Nonfiction and the Eugene V. Debs award for his writing and political activism. Zinn is the author of the internationally acclaimed play Marx in Soho, which has been touring the country in performance since its release.

  • In all honesty, I've avoided reading Zinn's "Emma" (and his "Marx in Soho") for years because my experience with literary pieces written by scholars is that they're usually didactic and lifeless. This was stupid on my part. After all, the eloquence of Zinn's You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train brought tears to my eyes on several occasions, and one of the things that makes his People's History a classic is the beauty of his style.

    So reading "Emma," when I finally turned to it, was pure pleasure. The play is divided into 2 acts with 23 scenes between them. The first act tracks Emma's life up to Alexander Berkman's assassination attempt on Henry Clay Frick. The second focuses on Emma's life up to her arrest (and eventual deportation) during World War I, with special emphasis on her tumultuous love affair with Ben Reitman.

    Zinn wants to pull off two things in "Emma": give the audience a good (although necessarily impressionistic) portrait of Emma Goldman the person, and also tell the audience something about her anarchist ideals and lifework. He does a good job of both, and especially manages to get across Emma's sheer love of life--"I realized my life could be...ecstatic," as she says at one point (p. 48)--that frequently set her apart from more dour, humorless fellow revolutionaries. (What might the Russian revolution have become if Lenin and Trotsky had loved life as fervently as Emma did?)

    Zinn also succeeds, without being heavy-handed, in showing Emma's ongoing relevance (something he also pulls off with Marx in "Marx in Soho"). At one point in the second act, for example, Emma gives a speech on patriotism. "What is patriotism?" she asks her audience--that is, us. "Those who have had the fortune of being born on some particular spot consider themselves better, and nobler than the living beings inhabiting any other spot. It is, therefore, the duty of everyone living on that chosen spot to fight, kill, and die to impose his superiority upon all the others. Patriotism is the nourishment of war." A member of the audience shouts in protest that "patriotism makes us a united people!" "Yes," replies Emma, "it unites us, against others!"

    "Emma" is guaranteed to whet one's appetite for more, and it sent me scurrying to reread old favorites--Kropotkin, Berkman, and Emma herself--who I haven't read in ages. I'd be ecstatic if I could actually see the play performed on stage. In this day and time especially, it merits a wide audience.
    _________
    * Emma to Berkman, Act 1, scene 9

  • Zinn does an excellent job of introducing readers to Goldman, Berkman, Most, Reitman and others. Readers get an accurate sense of their personalities and concerns, a consequence of Zinn's ability to adapt actual source material in the dialogue.
    The problem with play is that its intention seems to almost entirely consist in introducing readers to Goldman et al. Although that is a worthy aim, the play itself lacks the dramatic tension necessary to lend cohesion to its snapshots of Goldman's life. The play seems loosely organized around Berkman's incarceration and Goldman's erotic relationships. Because these events happened over several years, the play attempts to cover too much time and, consequently, lacks the dramatic intensity of a shortened time frame.
    Still, for anyone who loves and studies Goldman (as I do), this is a must read. It's clear that Zinn fully appreciates the greatness of this much-neglected radical.

  • Get an insight into a short period during Emma's life. I want to read a full biography of her now.

  • She was quite a woman.

  • So, this play gets four stars...but that's being generous. However, there are no other plays written about the amazing Red Emma, so Howard Zinn gets many, many kudos for writing a play about a person whom the American government and textbook writers would seem to want to forget about. Goldman was an amazing woman--anarchist and feminist, she was a proponent of free love (homo and heterosexual), an avid fighter for workers' rights and women's reproductive rights, and an impassioned speaker. In fact, in her heyday, her speeches would have drawn crowds the likes of Martin Luther King or Barack Obama.

    So, thank you, Howard Zinn for resurrecting Emma into play form. But let's be clear: Howard Zinn is not a playwright (although a stunning historian), and this is not a very good play. It's quite didactic, relatively undramatic, and long. Basically, Howard Zinn took a history book and put it into play form, without changing the style.

    So, a mixed bag altogether. It's an important play, because there's not really any other play about her, but let's just say, I hope someone writes a better one soon.