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ePub Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science download

by Douglas P. Starr

ePub Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science download
Author:
Douglas P. Starr
ISBN13:
978-0857201669
ISBN:
0857201662
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (March 1, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
True Crime
ePub file:
1168 kb
Fb2 file:
1233 kb
Other formats:
mbr lit doc mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
289

A riveting true crime story that vividly recounts the birth of modern forensics

A riveting true crime story that vividly recounts the birth of modern forensics. At the end of the nineteenth century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher, known and feared as The Killer of Little Shepherds, terrorized the French countryside. We follow the tense and exciting events leading to the murderer’s arrest.

Douglas Starr is codirector of the Center for Science and Medical Journalism and a professor of journalism at Boston University. His book Blood: An Epic History of Medicine and Commerce won the 1998 Los Angeles Times Book Prize and became a PBS-TV documentary special. He lives near Boston.

Starr, Douglas P. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 18, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Winner of the Gold Dagger AwardA fascinating true crime story that details the rise of modern forensics and the .

Winner of the Gold Dagger AwardA fascinating true crime story that details the rise of modern forensics and the development of modern criminal investigation. Here, Douglas Starr revisits Vacher’s infamous crime wave, interweaving the story of the two men who eventually stopped him?prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era’s most renowned criminologist. In dramatic detail, Starr shows how Lacassagne and his colleagues were developing forensic science as we know it. Building to a gripping courtroom denouement, The Killer of Little Shepherds is a riveting contribution to the history of criminal justice.

Mobile version (beta). The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science. Download (mobi, . 1 Mb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. At the end of the nineteenth century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher terrorized the French countryside, eluding authorities for years, and murdering twice as many victims as Jack The Ripper. Here, Douglas Starr revisits Vacher's infamous crime wave, interweaving the story of the two men who eventually stopped him-prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era's most renowned criminologist.

With high drama and stunning detail, relates the infamous crime and punishment of French serial killer Joseph Vacher, interweaving the story of how Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, Emile Fourquet and colleagues developed forensic science as we know it. Год: 2010. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

From Bookmarks Magazine Douglas Starr is an old pro at reporting and writing science history, which puts The Killer of Little Shepherds squarely in his wheelhouse. The author ably tells two stories-of the serial killer Vacher’s lust for murder and of the developing science that finally caught up with him-and there are enough fascinating details here to keep even the most jaded forensics fans entertained

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At the end of the nineteenth century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher, dubbed "The Killer of Little Shepherds," terrorized the French countryside. He eluded authorities for years-until he ran up against prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era's most renowned criminologist. The two men typified the Belle Epoque, a period of immense scientific achievement and fascination with its promise to reveal the secrets of the human condition. With high drama and stunning detail, Douglas Starr recounts the infamous crime and punishment of Vacher, interweaving the story of how Lacassagne and his colleagues developed forensics as we know it. We see one of the earliest uses of criminal profiling, as Fourquet painstakingly collects eyewitness accounts, leading to Vacher's arrest. And we see the twists and turns of the celebrated trial: to disprove Vacher's defense by reason of insanity, Fourquet recruits Lacassagne, who had revolutionized criminal science: refining the use of blood spatter evidence, systematizing the autopsy and doing ground-breaking research in psychology. Lacassagne's forensic investigation ranks among the greatest of all time, and its denouement is gripping. An important contribution to the history of medicine and criminal justice, impressively researched and thrillingly told.
  • At the tail end of the 19th Century, while France was still roiling with events of the Dreyfus Affair and while nearby England was in the midst of the terror of Jack the Ripper - in rural France a far more horrendous killing spree was taking place. For nearly three years a psychopathic serial killer was roaming the French countryside killing, raping, and mutilating young men and women. This "Jack the Ripper of the Northeast" killed at least eleven people, maybe as many as twenty-five. Some of the victims were shepherds, but what they all had in common were that they were young, small of stature, vulnerable and alone. They would all be killed quickly and mercilessly and then raped and/or mutilated in death. The viciousness of their deaths frightened and paralyzed much of the country.
    Raising this story above the typical true crime saga is not the riveting yet repulsive tale of a psychotic killer, but the parallel story of the coming of age of forensic science that would prove crucial to the fate of Joseph Vacher, the "Killer of Little Shepherds".
    Joseph Vacher was one of the most notorious serial killers of his century, slaughtering more people than Jack the Ripper. He was a clever and diabolical ex-soldier who had been released from a mental asylum where he had been placed after badly disfiguring his girlfriend and himself in a botched murder-suicide. After serving only ten months in the asylum, he convinced the doctors in charge that he was now sane. He would then begin his three-year odyssey of wandering throughout much of France committing the vilest of crimes, and then simply walking quickly to another district where news had not reached the community of the horror in his wake.
    Vacher may very well have gone on undetected for many more years had he not made the mistake of committing several of his atrocities in the Lyon region of France. For unbeknownst to him, the Lyon area was the home of the investigating Magistrate Emile Fourquet - a young, intelligent and ambitious policeman, and even more importantly Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne - head of the department of legal medicine at the University of Lyon and one of the most pre-eminent experts in the world in the field of forensic science which was just coming into its own.
    In fact Lacassagne and his associates were largely responsible for many of the new developments in the field of forensic medicine that would bring the field into the modern era and remain the state of the art for over half a century. Along with these technological advances in forensic medicine there were social, technological and economic factors that would lead to a media explosion with the advent of the so-called "penny press" with crime being a common sensationalistic focus of their reportage. In fact, the Vacher case received considerable coverage in both Europe and America, but unlike Jack the Ripper it quickly faded from historical celebrity due to the fact that there was a definitive discovery of the murderer.

    The work of Fourquet and Lacassagne made the outcome of the trial of Vacher an obvious and expeditious one as to whom the murderer was. However it was largely due to the meticulous examination, the testimony, and the reputation of Lacassagne in the world of forensic medicine that would find Vacher sane and thus responsible for his actions. This would ultimately seal his fate in a trial that was both contentious and widely followed.
    This book ends with a fleeting attempt to deal with the conundrum of why serial killers simultaneously intrigue and repulse us. It may be a never-ending quest to understand and label the behavior of the most deviant of our society. We try to explain their behaviors through the tragedies of their earlier lives or to find an explanation in the possible malformations of their brains, largely to give us some comfort. But what is often the situation, as in the case of Joseph Vacher, there is ultimately no simple or even logical explanation for the existence of such pure evil. We continue to strive to explain and understand it, but in the meantime all we know for sure is that it does exist. "We can only study it and try to keep it at bay."

  • The story told is very interesting. A serial killer who roamed France a century ago-- this is their basis for this book. The author makes very good use what surely had to be scarce documentary sources. I was most impressed by the discussion of the origins of modern forensics.

  • In 1898, a serial killer roamed the French countryside. He was able to elude capture for several reasons: a lack of communication between rual police, the breadth and width of the killer's range (he literally murdered across France), and to a large extent, the poor training of coroners and investigators (as forensic science was very much in its infancy.) It is precisely these elements that make this such tremendous reading.

    The killer - Joseph Vacher - was in modern parlance, as sociopath: intelligent, utterly without remorse, manipulative and possessing a tremendous ego, he was also a physically large man all of which allowed him to kill virtually at will. At the same time, forensic science was in its infancy - fingerprinting was becoming more common, and the Bertillion system of facial identification was just being developed. Among the preeminent thinkers of the day was Dr. Alexander Lacassagne, the father of forensic medicine and an influential figure in the development of forensic anthropology.

    With these two real-life characters as antagonist and protagonist, Starr vividly brings to life the emergence of modern thought around crime, forensics, criminology and psychology. Mind you, at the turn of the last century, there were a number of competing theories of why criminals behaved the way the did (from the Austrian criminologist Hans gross - who advocated interviewing suspects rather than beating a confession out of them, to Cesare Lombroso, who held that the shape of a person's head could be used to determine whether a person was a "born criminal" or not.)

    It is an intriguing read that is much more reminiscent of fiction than of the true-crime it is. In fact, much of the material comprising the narrative is drawn from court testamony, medical reports and psychiatric evaluations. For those interested in forensic anthropology, criminology or true crime, this is a must-read book. For others simply looking for an intriguing and tremendously entertaining read, this is worthy of attention. Highly recommended.