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ePub Starbucked - a double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce Culture download

by Taylor Clark

ePub Starbucked - a double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce  Culture download
Author:
Taylor Clark
ISBN13:
978-0340960813
ISBN:
0340960817
Language:
Publisher:
Sceptre (2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biography & History
ePub file:
1616 kb
Fb2 file:
1657 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf doc rtf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
187

STARBUCKED will be the first book to explore the incredible rise of the Starbucks Corporation and the caffeine-crazy culture that fueled its success.

STARBUCKED will be the first book to explore the incredible rise of the Starbucks Corporation and the caffeine-crazy culture that fueled its success. Part Fast Food Nation, part Bobos in Paradise, STARBUCKED combines investigative heft with witty cultural observation in telling the story of how the coffeehouse movement changed our everyday lives, from our evolving neighborhoods and workplaces to the ways we shop, socialize, and self-medicate

STARBUCKED will be the first book to explore the incredible rise of the Starbucks Corporation and the caffeine-crazy culture that fueled its success. has been added to your Cart. Part Fast Food Nation. Part Fast Food Nation, part Bobos in Paradise, Starbucked combines investigative heft with witty cultural observation in telling the story of how the coffeehouse movement changed our everyday lives, from our evolving Starbucked will be the first book to explore the incredible rise of the Starbucks Corporation and the caffeine-crazy culture that fueled its success.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-289) and index. Introduction: The experiment - The rise of the mermaid. Life before lattes ; A caffeinated craze ; The siren's song ; Leviathan - Getting steamed. Storm brewing ; A fair trade? ; What's in your cup ; Green-apron army ; The Seattle colonies - Epilogue: The last drop.

STARBUCKED will be the first book to explore the incredible rise of the Starbucks Corporation and the caffeine-crazy cu. .All of these ­ things - the Starbucks neighboring a Starbucks, the caffeinated harbor, the inquiry into the coffeehouse’s seductive appeal, the heated ethical debate over the actions of ­Starbucks - are signs of one company’s subtle impact on an entire planet. That essentially sums up the purpose of this book: to tell the story of how a major corporation, peddling a simple, ­age-­old commodity, influences the daily life and culture of the world. And Starbucks is a more important company than you might think.

Download Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce, and Culture PDF. Fonda Beck.

book by Taylor Clark . Truth be told, I still like 'Charbucks' and love the hustle and bustle of the stores as well as the blast of caffeine in a morning mocha that I can get. I simply enjoy The Bean Cup's brew rather much more.

In STARBUCKED, Taylor Clark provides an objective, meticulously reported look at the volatile issues like gentrification .

In STARBUCKED, Taylor Clark provides an objective, meticulously reported look at the volatile issues like gentrification and fair trade that distress activists and coffee zealots alike. -Adelle Waldman, New York Observer.

  • A surprisingly balanced book, considering the title is seemingly derived from an expletive. Taylor Clark offers up a history of Starbucks that is more cynical than the corporation would appreciate, yet the book comes off as warily appreciative of the cafe giant. If you are looking for a good read, the writing is comical and rich with stories about the much longer history of the coffee industry. If you can momentarily loosen your tight grip on your coffee cup to turn the pages of this book (or swipe on your e-reader), you will eventually be able to impress your friends with fun little coffee anecdotes. However, before you have a more serious talk with your friends, make sure they aren't clutching a cup of hot steaming beverage from their favorite Starbucks (you know, the one down the street from the one you prefer). Better yet, wait until they have had their daily triple caffeine dose to discuss the effects of Starbucks on the economy and their brain. If you read until the end of this book, you'll be able to argue both the pros and cons well.

  • Read a borrowed copy and enjoyed it so much took advantage of a great price on a used copy so I could add it to my bookshelf. Am reading it a second time. Even being a northwesterner very familiar with Starbucks from the earliest days (and a stockholder from day 1) there was lots of background that filled out an interesting and fun story. Likes that it goes beyond the Starbucks story as there is lots to discover about coffee in general.

  • Don't have Starbucks in my town so I shouldn't comment but this made for interesting reading all the same. Not quite sure how I feel about them other than as another global conglomerate. For the record, my drink is black and unsweetened.

  • When I moved up to the Seattle area in 1997, I was struck by the frenzied coffee culture. I was appalled to see one professional colleague chugging back several triple-shot espresso drinks a day. I wrote it off as a regional thing, but when I moved back to the San Francisco Bay Area two years later, I saw the same thing happening here. After encountering four Starbucks cafes within spitting distance of each other in downtown San Francisco, I began warning friends that Starbucks was an insidious cancer heading toward global domination. Friends were not equally alarmed. They just laughed politely.

    I found a kindred spirit in Taylor Clark, who also became worried when he noticed that three Starbucks stores had cropped up overnight in his small hometown of Ashland, Oregon. Unlike me, Clark turned his trepidation into investigation. The resultant tome is a well-researched, humorous, and educational account of Starbucks' history, economics, and culture.

    Starbucks is ubiquitous. They've managed to quietly turn a non-essential product into the second-most-traded physical commodity in the world. This is the story of the brilliant psychological techniques the company uses to endless expand, creating myriad new customers everywhere it goes while squeezing the maximum cash from each through outrageous price markups. As Clark explains, Starbucks' success is due in part to its sophisticated real estate machine, which ruthlessly grabs prime spots in all desirable (upscale) locales. The company's aim is to be inescapable, an unavoidable obstacle in your path.

    Starbucks is, of course, a huge dope pusher, addicting people to hyper-caffeinated products. Indeed, the world would come to a screeching halt if all of the Starbucks stores were suddenly closed one day; the millions of Starbucks customers would have massive headaches and be unable to think straight. Starbucks doesn't want to talk about the physically addictive aspect of its product. They'd rather talk about the community they create. And, complimentary to its real estate machine, the other key to Starbucks' success is the way that it has tapped into modern emotional earnings. As Clark discusses, Starbucks offers the disconnected a place to belong while remaining alone, in "a constantly exhausted, hyperprosperous society in search of emotional soothing."

    I guarantee that after reading this book, you'll notice more when you walk into a Starbucks, or simply drive down any street in almost any country. That includes Seoul, Korea, which houses the biggest Starbucks, or London, which has more Starbucks cafes than does New York, or even Saudi Arabia, which has an interesting relationship with the company. You'll have a greater appreciation of coffee dispensing as both theater and religion.

    This book presents a concise and informative history of the development of the modern coffee industry, from the importation of African slaves to grueling Brazilian coffee plantations (where their average life expectancy was seven years!) to the deliberate degradation of coffee quality through the introduction of cheaper, horrible-tasting Robusta beans by the "Big Four" (Procter & Gamble, etc.), leading to a consumer revolt and the gourmet coffee revolution.

    I was surprised to hear that Starbucks is considered by many to be more of a milk pusher than anything else. Indeed, it spends more money on milk than on coffee. And some of its high-sugar drinks have more calories and fat than a Big Mac and a medium soda combined!

    As a teaser, if you read this book you will learn why Starbucks should rightfully be known as Il Giornale, while Peet's (a fixture here in the San Francisco Bay Area) is the real Starbucks. (I won't spoil the surprise by saying more.)

    Despite Clark's initial stance toward Starbucks, the book is remarkably balanced, presenting some of the corporation's positives aspects and arguing with the cookie cutter portrayal of Starbucks as the arch villain of corporate expansionism and cultural homogeneity. You'll also be treated to the lowdown on the Fair Trade movement. I recommend this humorous and fast-paced book to anyone who drinks caffeine in any form, or whose path regularly crosses a Starbucks. I don't think I've left you out.

  • Interesting history of the growth of a big and unexpectedly big business. Not a "can't put it down" kind of book.

  • Very good writing, documented researched view of both pros and cons, clear view of some interesting points such as fair trade.... I recommend...

  • On time as advertised. Perfect!

  • An interesting foray into the birth of Starbucks, and how far it's strayed from it's original tenets. I finished the book neither disliking not liking Starbucks; I was left intrigued.