mostraligabue
» » Managing Business Ethics, PowerPoint Slides Handout: Straight Talk About How To Do It Right

ePub Managing Business Ethics, PowerPoint Slides Handout: Straight Talk About How To Do It Right download

by Linda K. Trevino,Katherine A. Nelson

ePub Managing Business Ethics, PowerPoint Slides Handout: Straight Talk About How To Do It Right download
Author:
Linda K. Trevino,Katherine A. Nelson
ISBN13:
978-0470834848
ISBN:
0470834846
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley; 3 edition (December 15, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Business Culture
ePub file:
1648 kb
Fb2 file:
1861 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw lrf txt
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
581

Start by marking Managing Business Ethics, PowerPoint Slides Handout: Straight .

Start by marking Managing Business Ethics, PowerPoint Slides Handout: Straight Talk about How to Do It Right as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Offering a highly realistic, down-to-earth look at ethics in the workplace, Linda K. Trevino and Katherine A. Nelson's Managing Business Ethics will help you identify and solve ethical dilemmas, understand why people behave and the way they do, and promote ethical behavior in your organization.

These books are designed to help you understand how 100 of the most commonly used Korean verbs. Aren't Bad Apples the Cause of Ethical Problems in Organizations? 1. .Journal article about Managing. Managing Business Ethics: Straight Talk About How To Do It Right. How to Get Started Day Trading Futures, Options, and Indicies. 95 MB·28,042 Downloads·New! investors to cost effectively trade entire stock indexes online?if they know where to start. 63 MB·66 Downloads·New! an individual do) this resource presents the whole business ethics story. Highly realistic, readab.

L. K. Trevino K. Paperback. Linda K. Treviño is Professor of Organizational Behavior, Cook Fellow in Busness Ethics, and Director of the Shoemaker Program in Business Ethics in the Smeal College of Business Administration at The Pennsylvania State University where she has been on faculty since 1987. She served as Chair of the Department of Management and Organization from 1999 - 2003.

Straight talk about managing business ethics: where . SPECIAL LINDA K. TREVIIÑO I have.

STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT MANAGING BUSINESS ETHICS: WHERE WE’RE GOING AND WHY 2 Introduction 2 The Financial Disaster of 2008 4 Borrowing Was Cheap 4 Real Estate Became the Investment of Choice 5 Mortgage Originators Peddled ‘‘Liar Loans’’ 5 Banks Securitized the Poison and Spread It Around 6 Those Who Were Supposed to Protect Us Didn’t 7 Moving Beyond Cynicism 9 Ca. TREVIIÑO I have always wondered what makes people do especially good and bad things.

Linda K. Trevino, Katherine A. Nelson. With the latest headlines in the business world, it’s more important than ever for managers to gain the skills to identify and solve ethical dilemmas as well as promote ethical behavior

Linda K. With the latest headlines in the business world, it’s more important than ever for managers to gain the skills to identify and solve ethical dilemmas as well as promote ethical behavior. The text includes an integration of the concept of value in several chapters to better tie the material together.

Introducing straight talk about managing. Katherine A. Nelson is a founding principal of Talent Strategy Partners in Media, Pennsylvania, and a senior fellow in business ethics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Her expertise includes ethics program design and strategic organizational communication. Kate and her partners at Talent Starategy Partners help organizations attain superior business results by focusing on the threee key levers that influence how employees deliver value-effective leadership, employee commitment, and a deliberate culture.

Linda Trevio and Kate Nelson bring together a mix of theory and practice inManaging Business Ethics: Straight Talk about How to.How This Book Is Structured 31. Conclusion 32. Discussion Questions 33.

How This Book Is Structured 31.

In thi. Selection from Managing Business Ethics: Straight Talk about . by Katherine A. Nelson, Linda K. Treviño.

While most business ethics texts focus exclusively on individual decision .

book by Katherine A.

Offering a highly realistic, down-to-earth look at ethics in the workplace, Linda K. Treviño and Katherine A. Nelson's Managing Business Ethics will help you identify and solve ethical dilemmas, understand why people behave and the way they do, and promote ethical behavior in your organization. The text moves beyond the scope of prescriptive individual ethical decision making to examinie how managers and organizations influence ethical decision making and behavior. Throughout, the emphasis is on common, real-life work situations, including hiring, managing, assessing performance, disciplining, firing, and providing incentives for staff, as well as producing quality products and services and dealing effectively and fairly with customers, vendors, and other stakeholders.
  • This book was used as the primary text, in a Master's Course in Organizational Leadership.

    The authors are Linda K. Trevino and Katherine A. Nelson. Both hail from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and it shows in the book. Joe Paterno shows up predictably as a paragon of ethics, on occasion. This would be annoying, if not for the indisputable fact that he is in fact known in this area, so a little consession even for the regional plug is in line. It says something to be coming from the cross-state rival. ;)

    This book does a very good job of presenting ethics in a way that can be understood despite the varied religious and social value systems that exist within the business community.

    If you are looking for a morals primer that dares to take strong stands on what is right and wrong, you will not find it here. Predictably, as an academic book, there is a fairly significant post-modern bent to the material. It appeals to incorporate personal moral codes to be sure, but most appeals are in the abstract and more often then not come across as something that seems obligatory to say, but no real direction as to what that might mean and when to exercise it is offered. It usually reduces to an appeal to "follow your gut."

    The book is divided into 5 sections which build upon each other progressively.

    Section 1 focuses on the introductory elements of what Business Ethics are and why they should matter. The primary answers to note are that organizations have to manage ethics in terms of a liability to control costs, preserve reputation and maintain market share.

    Section 2 relates to ethics and the individual. Descriptions of fundamental issues such as conflicts of interest, legal issues surrounding discrimination and sexual harassment and then whistleblowing's increasing profile in corporate society are covered. Most important, the basis for ethics and how they are arrived at within a Psychological and Social context are examined.

    Not surprisingly, in view of the premises the book rests upon, situational ethics predominate. Different approaches are examining and costing consequences, examining whether a higher sense of duty or obligation exists from which to gauge response and yes, there is a nod of the head toward Virtue-based Ethics but no particular "brand" identified or endorsed, which makes the reference curious in that regard.

    Some management tools to follow are provided which should indeed prove practical and helpful which was refreshing to see in what could have simply remained as academic tome.

    Then follows a strong portion on the Psychological factors of determining right from wrong which addresses such issues as Moral Awareneess and Moral Judgment. Psychological issues such as Script Processing, the emotions involved in ethical decision making and an in-depth look at the Ford Pinto case round this section out.

    Section 3 brings the focus onto Managers and Management. Basic issues such as hiring, firing and discipline are dealt with in addition to the important observation that management creates a workplace environment, not only by what is said but moreso by what is modeled. Therefore there are conclusions drawn in terms of what influence management has to enact ethical change within an organization. Primarily the appeal is to behavioral reinforcement and understanding of certain psychological "truths" that have become evident with organizations. There is lots of good material here including reward systems, peer pressure, assigned roles and communications all addressed in turn. A good section exists as well addressing how responsibility diffuses within an organization and that suggests some methods of how to deliberately instill personal responsibility to combat this trend.

    Section 4 focuses on specific ethical problems which are endemic within organizations. In particular the competing interests of all stakeholders including shareholders, employees, management, consumers, and the community at large are examined and some methodology for how to navigate through these seemingly perennial conflicts of interest.

    Better yet, the organizational culture is addressed with a multitude of case studies and discussion questions to delve in "the belly of the beast" in terms of all that this involves.

    An obligatory chapter on Legal Compliance follows which in my opinion was the weakest portion of the book. This type of material is by nature going to be dull, but it also is continually changing and roots things clearly within US corporate culture.

    Section 5 at the end moves the focus from what has been exclusively the US and approaches some of the unique issues of the Global Business Environment. Frankly, this too is pretty weak. It is worthy of its own book to deal with the unique characteristics of all the different

    Overall, this is an excellent book. It is packed with great contemporary examples from recent history that speak very strongly to the need for a renewed sense of responsibility and ethics in the corporate world.

    As is true with most academic books, it is overpriced and designed to move rapidly through editions to keep it that way. $60 for a soft-cover book is just not reasonable. I'm not adverse to paying a fair price for cutting edge knowledge. I expect quality for that not just in information, but also the physical characteristics of the book.

    The average reader will find this likely tiresome when compared with more popular books in this area. Corporate offices and managers would be well advised to pick this up and in addition to reading, finding others to work through it as a team and use the many excellent case studies found within to their benefit.

    This is primarily for the classroom. If you'll use it and work with it, however, I can see it being an excellent resource for the corporate manager, ethics officer or human resources leader.

  • So far so good. It is a good tool. Our instructor is very happy with it too. However, next semester the new edition will be used. It is not boring either. I would recommend this book to any future student.

  • like it

  • This should be mandatory reading for business leaders today. It is one of the leading college textbooks on the subject and for good reason--the stories are incredible.
    Having worked at Scott Paper Compnay during the Al Dunlap regime, I know that the stories may be hard to believe but are true.
    The chapters do a good job of building on each other and the writing style is readable.
    Glad to have the next edition published.

  • This was a mandatory book for an MBA program on Business Ethics. It puts ethics in everyday language and examples and is not all theory.

  • I have long thought other books focused too much on philosophy or large scale ethics problems at corporations. This book gives everyone advice and practical tools to deal with ethics at all levels in a company. I highly recommend it for anyone wanting to find out how to apply ethics in their organization.

  • This is my favourite book about ethics! The examples are down-to-earth and the theories are presented in a way that makes it easier to grasp and bring into classrooms!

  • the author lives in a dream world and is not in touch with the business work environment of today. Her advice is old-fashioned and out-of-date. Many better textbooks on Ethics available.