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ePub Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done download

by Ram Charan,Charles Burck,Larry Bossidy

ePub Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done download
Author:
Ram Charan,Charles Burck,Larry Bossidy
ISBN13:
978-0609610572
ISBN:
0609610570
Language:
Publisher:
Currency; 1 edition (June 15, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Business Culture
ePub file:
1809 kb
Fb2 file:
1454 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr lrf mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
268

Bossidy and Charan dive into the critical gap of getting things done in this management classic. Focused on execution, the authors discuss the critical components for leadership within an execution/get stuff done environment.

Bossidy and Charan dive into the critical gap of getting things done in this management classic. Pointing out the failures of hands off management, ivory tower thinking and micromanagement, the emphasis is on those critical elements that combine the what needs to be done and who needs to do it to execute on a business strategy or operational plan.

In July 2001 Larry Bossidy was asked by the board of directors of Honeywell International (it had merged with AlliedSignal) to return and .

In July 2001 Larry Bossidy was asked by the board of directors of Honeywell International (it had merged with AlliedSignal) to return and get the company back on track. He’s been putting the ideas he writes about in Execution to work in real time.

Bossidy and Charan aver that execution is a discipline integral to strategy, that it is the major job of any business leader hoping not just to be a success but to dominate a market, and that it is a core element of corporate culture

Bossidy and Charan aver that execution is a discipline integral to strategy, that it is the major job of any business leader hoping not just to be a success but to dominate a market, and that it is a core element of corporate culture

Start by marking Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done as. .

Start by marking Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Execution may very well be the best business book of the year, and one of the most useful to have come around in a long time. It's rare to find a book like this that blends smart practice with. Moreover, Bossidy and Charan boast an impressive enough track record that anyone who wants to stay sharp at the helm will welcome their assistance.

L ARRY BOSSIDY AND RAM CHARAN with Charles Burck. No part of this book may be reproduced or trans­ mitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the pub­ lisher. Published by Crown Business, New York, New York. Member of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc. ww. andomhouse

Execution by charles burck, larry bossidy. Putting an execution culture in place is hard, but losing it is easy

Execution by charles burck, larry bossidy. The book that shows how to get the job done and deliver results. whether you’re running an entire company or in your first management job. Larry Bossidy is one of the world’s most acclaimed CEOs, a man with few peers who has a track record for delivering results. Putting an execution culture in place is hard, but losing it is easy. In July 2001 Larry Bossidy was asked by the board of directors of Honeywell International (it had merged with AlliedSignal) to return and get the company back on track.

The Discipline of Getting Things Done. By Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan and Charles Burck. Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done is well written and gives sound, practical advice about how to make things happen. It is well worth the reading

The Discipline of Getting Things Done. It is well worth the reading. Ralph S. Larsen, chairman and CEO, Johnson & Johnson. Larry Bossidy recognizes how execution in a business defines the true greatness of a company.

Bossidy and Charan aver that execution is a discipline integral to strategy, that it is the major job of any business leader hoping not just to be a success but to dominate a market, and that it is a core element of corporate culture

Bossidy and Charan aver that execution is a discipline integral to strategy, that it is the major job of any business leader hoping not just to be a success but to dominate a market, and that it is a core element of corporate culture

by Charles Burck(Author), Larry Bossidy(Author), Ram Charan(Author) & 0 more. When Execution was first published in 2002, it changed the way we did our jobs. By analysing the discipline of getting things done, it helped thousands of business people to make the final leap to success.

by Charles Burck(Author), Larry Bossidy(Author), Ram Charan(Author) & 0 more. Now, Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan reframe their empowering message for a world in which the old rules have been shattered and radical change is becoming routine. For the foreseeable future: - Growth will be slower.

The book that shows how to get the job done and deliver results . . . whether you’re running an entire company or in your first management job.Larry Bossidy is one of the world’s most acclaimed CEOs, a man with few peers who has a track record for delivering results. Ram Charan is a legendary advisor to senior executives and boards of directors, a man with unparalleled insight into why some companies are successful and others are not. Together they’ve pooled their knowledge and experience into the one book on how to close the gap between results promised and results delivered that people in business need today.After a long, stellar career with General Electric, Larry Bossidy transformed AlliedSignal into one of the world’s most admired companies and was named CEO of the year in 1998 by Chief Executive magazine. Accomplishments such as 31 consecutive quarters of earnings-per-share growth of 13 percent or more didn’t just happen; they resulted from the consistent practice of the discipline of execution: understanding how to link together people, strategy, and operations, the three core processes of every business.Leading these processes is the real job of running a business, not formulating a “vision” and leaving the work of carrying it out to others. Bossidy and Charan show the importance of being deeply and passionately engaged in an organization and why robust dialogues about people, strategy, and operations result in a business based on intellectual honesty and realism.The leader’s most important job—selecting and appraising people—is one that should never be delegated. As a CEO, Larry Bossidy personally makes the calls to check references for key hires. Why? With the right people in the right jobs, there’s a leadership gene pool that conceives and selects strategies that can be executed. People then work together to create a strategy building block by building block, a strategy in sync with the realities of the marketplace, the economy, and the competition. Once the right people and strategy are in place, they are then linked to an operating process that results in the implementation of specific programs and actions and that assigns accountability. This kind of effective operating process goes way beyond the typical budget exercise that looks into a rearview mirror to set its goals. It puts reality behind the numbers and is where the rubber meets the road. Putting an execution culture in place is hard, but losing it is easy. In July 2001 Larry Bossidy was asked by the board of directors of Honeywell International (it had merged with AlliedSignal) to return and get the company back on track. He’s been putting the ideas he writes about in Execution to work in real time.
  • This is severely dated at this point, and their knowledge of how IBM was run under Sam Palmisano is woefully incorrect. If you can ignore the first 3rd of the book, the other two thirds focusing on strategy and people processes are great. They all have to be in sync to move forward, but gone are the days of the line manager being pushed down from above to make all the decisions, instead it is up to the players to make the decisions.

  • For the Christmas Holidays, as we were packing the ski stuff from the basement before we left to VT, I chanced upon some books lying there, and noticed the one titled 'Execution,' by Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan which I had bought almost 8 years ago but never got around to reading it. On a whim, I decided to take it with me and ended up reading it through these holidays.

    A quick caveat to put aside. I do wish folks would not use company names as examples in books. The original one of these, "In Search of Excellence" by Tom Peters did that. So did Jim Collins in "Good to Great". And this book does it too. What happens is that the authors use some company as an example to cite either a good or a bad practice. And a decade has passed and things have changed (perhaps 180 degrees). And that induces a chuckle in addition to both dating the book and casting doubt on the claim.

    However, at least for this book, 'Execution', the above is only a caveat, since I found the book quite meaningful. The reason I perhaps did not read it when I first bought it many years ago is that it felt genuinely elementary. I was at the peak of my strategy work and when you are working on projects that are either reshaping a company or positioning oneself in new markets, the discipline of execution seems not only boring, but downright waste of time (not the importance of it mind you, but rather spending time thinking or reading about it).

    However, now that I have moved on from the strategy function myself and am in a line management role with accountability for business results and accountability for a team and partner-relationships to deliver those results, I view this book in an entirely new light!

    To share a personal reaction as I read this book ( a feeling I have not had since when I sat for my twelfth grade board examination!) - when I thought about implementing the ideas that Larry and Ram were talking about in their book on Tuesday morning Jan 2nd when I return to work, my stomach tightens into a knot! The level of sustained focus, discipline, follow through, attention to detail they expect in execution is non-trivial to say the least. Again, conceptually easy to grasp; but quite daunting if one thinks about putting them into real practice on a sustained basis throughout an organization!

    Very briefly, they touch upon the strategic, people and operational processes as three core processes that are building blocks for execution and show how the three are related to each other. And through their experience and examples demonstrate how to implement each of these effectively. One particular insight that I liked that Larry made in particular was, 'just because an executive is good in her current job, does not mean she is ready or capable for the next'. Which is similar to what our Chairman says, "do the job you have been assigned, not your previous one."

    Of course with a background in engineering (and manufacturing to boot), this whole notion of execution and organizing to execute is not alien to me at all. And in reality, my immersion for a long time in strategic work was what I needed to be more lithe in my thinking. However executing by one self or with a small team in a localized way on a specific deterministic engineering problem is one challenge. But to do the same with large revenues and large teams at stake and working through your teams through other teams with high week-to-week dependence on market conditions is another challenge.

    This timely book was very worthwhile spending time with. Dated examples notwithstanding, one of the more immediately useful and relevant books in the business genre that I have read in a long time.

  • Bossidy and Charan dive into the critical gap of getting things done in this management classic. Focused on execution, the authors discuss the critical components for leadership within an execution/get stuff done environment. Pointing out the failures of hands off management, ivory tower thinking and micromanagement, the emphasis is on those critical elements that combine the what needs to be done and who needs to do it to execute on a business strategy or operational plan.

    The critical linking of strategy, operations and people is the role of the business leader, and in order to accomplish that critical mission, the leader must be meaningfully involved in those three elements - not micromanaging them, but leading them to efficient execution. The leader's most important job is the selection and appraising of the people in the organization, and this element should consume the bulk of their efforts and should never be delegated. The leader must embrace this role and thrive in it to ensure proper execution of the strategy and operations.

    The combination of people and strategy lead to an operating plan, in which the execution takes place. This plan needs to be realistic, ambitious, resourced, specific and accountable. The authors note that this piece is often the art that falls short - where the operating plan is divorced from the strategy and people - and the execution suffers.

    The book has critical questions and suggestions for the leader, and provides a platform for thought that is focused on getting things done rather than just the what and who theory of planning. An important read.

  • Projects fail on execution.

    Execution is the difference between success and just trying.

    Typically, companies and individuals don't know how to execute.

    A well-executed book about execution. Loved it.

  • A few years ago, the reading club at my company proposed this book. Immediately I yelled "Boring!" When asked why, I said, "Execution is what we do every day. I question that this will stretch us." Now I finally have read the book, and stand by my initial comment.

    There is some value here, to be clear. Some interesting anecdotes. Some fascinating preening by Bossidy, who clearly sees himself, Jack Welch, and one or two others as smarter than anyone else in the corporate world. And some healthy focus on the how of moving from strategy to action, and on the importance of developing leaders.

    But the book's fundamental premise, that companies fail (unless run by him, Jack or a few friends) because they don't execute, only stands because the authors subordinate strategy to execution. In other words, execution means strategy, plus moving from strategy to action. Well, I guess. I just don't see much value in that definition.

    Let's keep the issues separate. Strategy matters. If you agree with that, then read Jim Collins and a host of others to figure out what matters most. How strategy is built matters. If you agree with that, this book has some useful ideas, but nothing I haven't seen in several companies. And moving strategy into action to achieve results matter. Again, this book has useful ideas, but nothing that rocks my world.

    Bottom line, the book over reaches. Worth a quick scan. Definitely some good ideas. But it reads like a vanity piece. I found no intellectual rigor here, no "ah ha!" insights, no frameworks I could add to my management toolkit.

    Net, as I suspected years ago: Boring!