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ePub 160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic download

by Jerome Alexander

ePub 160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic download
Author:
Jerome Alexander
ISBN13:
978-1932047080
ISBN:
1932047085
Language:
Publisher:
Llumina Press (September 30, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Business Culture
ePub file:
1377 kb
Fb2 file:
1646 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf mobi docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
702

160 Degrees of Deviation book.

160 Degrees of Deviation book. The good intentions of corporate management are frequently undermined by 160 Degree Deviators with personal agendas who cause morale to suffer and frustration to set in. The author identifies this subculture and discusses why and how it's able to thrive.

You’ve reached the office of The Corporate Cynic, the official blog of Jerome Alexander. I’ve categorized my posts to make it easier to navigate and find exactly what you’re looking for: Latest Post – contains my newest article, rant or story. If you’ve already read all the others, here’s a quick way to view anything new before it’s remanded to another catagory.

Jerome Alexander, . A From the author of 160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic. Jerome Alexander, . From the author of 160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic.

Find nearly any book by Jerome Alexander. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Colloid Chemistry: An Introduction With Some Practical Applications (1919). ISBN 9781161736069 (978-1-161-73606-9) Hardcover, Kessinger Publishing, LLC, 2010.

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Read "160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic" by Jerome Alexander. Here are the views of a real critic of corporate leadership. Special Interest Group Leader. How to Grow Towards a Higher Organizational Purpose.

To be a team player, I did just that. But today I watched you standing in the foyer, openly yelling at one of my coworkers without asking for her side of the story. So much for thinking win/win and seeking first to understand. I admire your courage in expressing your views openly about your manager. I hope that the expected outcome was as good as hoped.

Recommended reading: 160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic by Jerome Alexander.

CEO Hal Rosenbluth was once about to hire an executive with all the right skills, the right personality and the perfect CV. His interviews went swimmingly and he’d said all the right things, but something about him still made Rosenbluth nervous, though he couldn’t put his finger on just what it was. His solution was genius: He invited the applicant to a company softball game, and here he showed his true colors. Recommended reading: 160 Degrees of Deviation: The Case for the Corporate Cynic by Jerome Alexander. Find out where these jerks come from! Alexander says: December 4, 2006 at 3:36 pm.

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В этом разделе вы можете найти различные книги: художественную литературу и беллетристику на иностранных языках, пособия и методички, учебную и справочную литературу по изучающему языку. К вашему вниманию художественная литература на немецком и английском языке. Словари и энциклопедии. А понравившиеся издания вы можете заказать с доставкой.

The good intentions of corporate management are frequently undermined by 160 Degree Deviators with personal agendas who cause morale to suffer and frustration to set in. The author identifies this subculture and discusses why and how it's able to thrive.
  • Anyone who has witnessed the managerial follies of big business for 25 years, certainly has the credentials to be a corporate cynic.

    Inside the hallowed walls of major corporations around the world, the corporate cynic is an unwelcome spectator; the heckler who refuses to keep quiet while the incompetent management team continues to fail.

    Yet the author, Jerome Alexander, describes in candid detail the various forms of bad leadership that have been plaguing Corporate America for years; and for some reason, this has become the norm; an accepted part of the way things are being run, as our collective shoulders shrug, as if to say, "Oh well, that's just the way it is."

    Cynics are desperately needed, because the way things are in most major corporations, is not such a good state of affairs. A wake up call is in order; management is failing to respond to the needs of its employees and customers.

    160 Degrees of Deviaton delivers that wake up call with a bucket full of ice water; let's hope there are enough buckets of ice water to go around that vast wasteland of Corporate America.

  • I think this book was well written. I guess I was hoping it would tell me how to deal with the 160 degree deviators. However , it does not promise to do that and it didn't .
    What I don't get is why such books should even need to be written. I do not understand why companies think they can be productive with bad bosses . I wish the book had explained that.

  • Even the best organizations have good intentions when instituting new plans or policies. Something always seems to go wrong, because of a type of manager called the 160 Degree Deviator. These are people with their own agendas who damage company morale and cause frustration to rise. The reason that they aren't called 180 Degree Deviators is that the author gives the company 20 degrees "credit" for having the right idea.
    The author theorizes that some people are just born jerks, or become that way after exposure to other jerks. Such pompous, overbearing people should never be let anywhere near a management position. Devaitors can be of either gender, and can be found anywhere between foreman and senior management. They are preoccupied with superficial things, like the look of a report instead of what's inside. They dominate all conversations with peers and subordinates, and monopolize meetings. They rarely apologize for a mistake or false accusation, especially when it involves someone lower than them on the company totem pole. They recruit spies to feed them the latest gossip about others. Deviators will only hire or promote those who hold them in high esteem. they use a lot of possessive pronouns, like "my people" or "my department," as if a piece of the company is their personal property. In short, 160 Degree Deviators have an exaggerated sense of their own self-importance. They consider themselves the center of the universe, and expect to be treated as such. Sound familiar?
    What to do about such people? It's easy to say that so-and-so is a "kook" or is thinking outside the box; tell that to their subordinates or people in other departments. At all times, challenge Deviators to put up or shut up. Meetings should be called for specific purposes with specific attendees; don't let Anyone monopolize them. People who lie or sacrifice others to cover their mistakes should be immediately dismissed. If Manager X is considered "harmless" by senior management, transfer them someplace where they will be harmless, but get them out of that management job.
    This book is excellent. A copy is needed in every company in America, Fortune 500 included. The CEO who says "it doesn't happen here" needs to take a closer look at their company. It is highly recommended.

  • The book is full of practical examples of mismanagement. It is thought provoking and managers should challenge themselves against these examples before they start managing. This book is especially recommended for senior managers who are complacent with the state of their organization. I would also strongly recommended this book to university students of business departments. They would know tip of an iceberg of what they will have to face after graduation. They will get better understanding of what the management is in real world. Maybe this knowledge will influence their career plans...

    Some conclusions in this book may seem moderately justified or over idealistic but the book presents opinions and expernieces of the author so for this reason readers should not expect the book to be 100% objective.

    Overally, the book is much more interesting and valuable than other publications on mismanagement written by academics or consultants who never personally experienced mismanagement and have poor sense of what management and business is about.