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ePub Intellectual Capital: Forty Years of the Nobel Prize in Economics download

by Dr Tom Karier

ePub Intellectual Capital: Forty Years of the Nobel Prize in Economics download
Author:
Dr Tom Karier
ISBN13:
978-0521763264
ISBN:
0521763266
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (August 30, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Economics
ePub file:
1440 kb
Fb2 file:
1191 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
526

The Nobel Prize in Economic Science established by the Bank of Sweden in 1969 has been granted to 64 individuals. Thomas Karier explores the core ideas of the economic theorists whose work led to their being awarded the Nobel in its first forty years

The Nobel Prize in Economic Science established by the Bank of Sweden in 1969 has been granted to 64 individuals. Thomas Karier explores the core ideas of the economic theorists whose work led to their being awarded the Nobel in its first forty years. He also discusses the assumptions and values that underlie their economic theories, revealing different and controversial features of the content and methods of the discipline. The Nobelists include Keynesians, monetarists, financial economists, behaviorists, historians, statisticians, mathematicians, game theorists, and other innovators.

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John Davis, University of Amsterdam and Marquette University. Even-handed, lively, and (surprisingly) compelling survey of the top, modern economists and the ideas they got right and wrong.

The Nobel Prize in Economic Science established by the Bank of Sweden in 1969 has been granted to 64 individuals. Thomas Karier explores the core ideas of the economic theorists whose work led to their being awarded the Nobel in its first 40 years. Similar books and articles.

The Nobel Prize in Economic There is arguably no award more recognized in the academic and professional worlds than the Nobel Prize

The Nobel Prize in Economic There is arguably no award more recognized in the academic and professional worlds than the Nobel Prize. The public pays attention to the prizes in the fields of economics, literature, and peace because their recipients are identified with particular ideas, concepts, or actions that often resonate with or sometimes surprise a global audience. The Nobel Prize in Economic Science established by the Bank of Sweden in 1969 has been granted to 64 individuals.

But as important, he has subjected the goals and roles of the Nobel Prize in economics to critical analysis, something that he has convinced me is needed. Thomas Karier is a Professor of Economics and a former associate dean at Eastern Washington University, Cheney, Washington, where he began teaching in 1981.

The Nobel Prize in Economic Sc There is arguably no award more recognized in the academic and professional worlds than the Nobel Prize.

There is arguably no award more recognized in the academic and professional worlds than the Nobel Prize.

There is arguably no award more recognized in the academic and professional worlds than the Nobel Prize. The public pays attention to the prizes in the fields of economics, literature, and peace because their recipients are identified with particular ideas, concepts, or actions that often resonate with or sometimes surprise a global audience. The Nobel Prize in Economic Science established by the Bank of Sweden in 1969 has been granted to 64 individuals. Thomas Karier explores the core ideas of the economic theorists whose work led to their being awarded the Nobel in its first 40 years. He also discusses the assumptions and values that underlie their economic theories, revealing different and controversial features of the content and methods of the discipline. The Nobelists include Keynesians, monetarists, financial economists, behaviorists, historians, statisticians, mathematicians, game theorists, and other innovators. Rich in biographical details, illuminating the modern history of the discipline as a whole, Intellectual Capital allows an audience of lay and professional readers to readily understand the notions that define modern economic science and practice. It pointedly asks, and answers, whether the prizes have been awarded to those economists "who have during the previous year rendered the greatest service to mankind."
  • Recently-read economics titles I have benefitted greatly from, I would call more fundamental and entry-level, but which are superior in their clarity and accessibility, are (1) The Great Lectures Series' title, Thinking Like an Economist: A Guide To Rational Decision Making, and (2) 50 Economics Ideas You Really Need to Know by Edmund Conway. (I bought these in audio form.) Now, one step further, wanting to know more about the thinkers who developed some of these popular ideas I have heard of (at least the more recent ones), I found this book.
    Fair warning: this author has opinions. However, I respond, (1) the information here about the Nobellists' ideas is very rich, but still understandable at popular level (without having to wade through huge papers and all the math), (2) the author's opinions are very transparent to the reader, i.e., there are no tricks here; we can discern when the author is injecting his own views. It is easy, not laborious, to sift out what (on a general level) the Nobel laureate's ideas were, versus the author's. These views are not unduly belabored. And, (3) though many times I disagree in some ways with the author's views, generally I feel I benefit from them. This has nicely filled this early-post-beginner level in my learning.

  • Karier's latest book deserves attention both for its potential as a college text in the history of economics and for the insights it provides into the enormous influence unproven theories can exert on national policies and the general health of the economy. I was especially struck by how strongly people's quality of life can be affected by an ivory tower intellectual's academic exercise in theoretical mathematics. Political leaders, at a loss for practical ideas, grasp at these wispy theories and enact policies that have an equal chance of failing or succeeding. "Intellectual Capital" is another window into how the world really works.

  • This is an excellent book that provide a lot of information in an intelligent, entertaining way. I read a lot of books and have a good perspective on it. This is well worth your time.

  • lots of great work- tremendous resources

  • Dr. Karier's wit and wisdom are on display in this history of economic thought and trends as seen through the lens of the Nobel Prize Committee. I would recommend this book for anyone with an interest in economics.

  • This rapid-paced, fascinating, critical, and entertaining survey of the achievements (and shortcomings) of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics is highly recommended for any reader who wants an easily accessible, historically grounded introduction into the major economic debates since the prize was first awarded in 1969. Karier has a gift for explaining complex theories in clear, simple language; he writes very precisely, but with a light touch, a sense of humor, and a slightly mischievous delight in unmasking political bias, faulty reasoning, and unwarranted assumptions. If Karier's book has a consistent theme, it is to challenge the prize committee's practice of rewarding economists who provide complex mathematical proofs for theories that apply only to (nonexistent) perfect free markets or have no practical application whatsoever. "Economic theories should do more than solve mathematical puzzles," he writes; "they should really explain real economic events" (p. 72). The so-called Chicago School founded by Milton Friedman, the prize-winner in 1976, does not come off particularly well, although Karier does give due credit to the elegant equations developed by many of its followers in their efforts to prove the superiority of a free-market system, even if it is based on the unrealistic assumptions of so many of the practitioners of microeconomics. Karier praises the committee for its occasional tolerance of different political perspectives, most spectacularly in 1974, when the award was shared by two economists with totally contradictory theories, the free-marketeer Friedrich von Hayek and the advocate of government intervention Gunnar Myrdal. Karier's own sympathies are clearly with the latter. In his last chapter he offers some strong advice to the Nobel Prize committee, if it is serious about its proclaimed intention to "consistently recognize the greatest service to mankind" (p. 301). "It is time to stop looking for clear solutions of interesting academic puzzles, and instead start looking for real insights into actual economic problems" (p. 302). Among these he lists poverty, underdevelopment, financial crises, the business cycle, environmental degradation, discrimination, mass marketing, resource depletion, corporate power, and the costs of war. A book for our times!

  • What a fascinating peak into the minds of Nobel Prize winning economists. They have a unique way of looking at their surroundings and this book does a great job of merging their views with the real world. From George Stigler lecturing the Nobel community on the meaning of science to Gary Becker viewing families as factories, or Theodore Shultz resigning over a debate between butter and margarine. But because these economists don't view things the same way, their insights have changed the world. Tom Karier does an amazing job making their ideas accessible to the common person in a way that is entertaining.

  • Dr. Karier's book is an excellent choice for an introductory course in economics. The clarity he brings to the explanation of economic theories without using complicated mathematical formulas is a pleasant surprise. The book provides the knowledge citizens need to judge economic policies being proposed to resolve our countries serious economic problems.