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ePub Big Blues: The Unmaking of IBM. download

by Paul Carroll

ePub Big Blues: The Unmaking of IBM. download
Author:
Paul Carroll
ISBN13:
978-0297813156
ISBN:
0297813153
Language:
Publisher:
see notes for publisher info; 1st edition (1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Industries
ePub file:
1808 kb
Fb2 file:
1887 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi docx lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
530

Big Blues has many of the same qualities as other memorable journalistic feats of recent years, The Right Stuff, for . This book is the viewpoint of IBM by an outside journalist. It lacks a table of contents. The book describes the problems, it does not tell when or why it originated.

Big Blues has many of the same qualities as other memorable journalistic feats of recent years, The Right Stuff, for instance, or All the President's Men. That is, it has tension, simplicity, and significance.

Big Blues: The Unmaking . .has been added to your Cart. Carroll, who covered IBM for seven years with the Wall Street Journal, breathes drama into this high-tech tale by focusing not on technological minutiae but on the human players, from fabled chairman Tom Watson Jr. to Microsoft wunderkind Bill Gates (who, more than anyone else, authored IBM's undoing).

This book is the viewpoint of IBM by an outside journalist. Published on June 17, 2009.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 370) and index. With the introduction of the IBM PC in the early 1980s, IBM stood poised to extend its dominance of the computer industry well into the twenty-first century. The meteoric rise of competitors like Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Compaq, Sun, and others derailed IBM's dream of controlling the future. Tens of thousands of IBM employees consequently lost their jobs, their retirement hopes, and their security. And investors saw their savings shrivel.

Start by marking Big Blues: The Unmaking of IBM as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Paul Caroll's years of experience covering IBM and his expertise as a writer really shows in this riveting documentary of IBM. The only problem with the book is that it is out of date

Paul Caroll's years of experience covering IBM and his expertise as a writer really shows in this riveting documentary of IBM. The only problem with the book is that it is out of date. IBM has turned its business around under its present management and is doing quite well. It also provides a rare and wonderful insight into the perpetual battle between the creative individual and the second-rate bureaucrat.

Chronicles the decline of IBM, explaining how corporate pride, inflexibility, bad decisions, and an inability to understand a changing marketplace has led to IBM's fall. 100,000 first printing.

Chicago Tribune "Big Blues has many of the same qualities as other memorable journalistic feats of recent years, The . Big Blues" -- Book about IBM. This was an interesting book despite some unusual sentence-phrasing and awkward continuity in places.

Chicago Tribune "Big Blues has many of the same qualities as other memorable journalistic feats of recent years, The Right Stuff, for instance, or All the President's Men. New York Newsday "Recommended to executives of all multinationals, not just American ones, as a cautionary tale about corporate hubris. The Economist "Riveting. It also left me unsatisified because the events ended over 20 years ago.

IBM, one of the world's most successful and highly regarded corporations, has now . Book pak, Books on Tape, 1994.

IBM, one of the world's most successful and highly regarded corporations, has now fallen from its illustrious climb to glory. Alexander Adams's narrat. Adams's presentation adds strength to Carroll's message to corporate America: don't let this happen to you! .

Big Blues : The Unmaking of IB. And investors saw their savings shrivel

By (author) Paul Carroll. In Big Blues, Wall Street Journal reporter Paul Carroll attributes IBM's downfall mainly to a lethal combination of corporate hubris, inflexibility, and an inability to understand what was happening in the computer marketplace. While tracing every misstep by this corporate giant and its leaders, Carroll fills Big Blues with behind-the-scenes revelations and entertaining anecdotes about major players in the computer and software industries such as IBM chieftain John F. Akers, and rivals Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mitch Kapor and others.

  • For anyone interested in IBM's recent history, this is an excellent account. It shows how IBM failed to adapt to the effects of new technology in the 1980's. At the end of this period, Lou Gerstner took over as CEO. If you also read Lou Gerstner's book "Who Says Elephants Can't Dance," you can get some idea how in this archetypal U.S. company, workers were shoved aside for the sake of success after the failure that came to a head in 1993. Lou was ruthless and greedy, but his formula for centralization saved the company for the time being. In the process, workers were exploited to some extent and security disappeared from their lives. I wonder how long this solution will continue to work. I think that an organization that disregards its workers' needs is vulnerable. At least two possibilities exist: the company weakens because of lack of support from its employees or employees get more power by force. The conflict between haves and have-nots damages the business. Dictatorships are unstable.

  • Entertaining look at early personal computer days. Also recommend "Jobs Vs. Gates" video.

  • If you love the tech industry, especially tales of the "golden age" of PCs in the 1980s, you will love this book.

    If you manage a company (tech or not) that has a commanding market share lead in its space, you should read this book.

    This is practically a manual for what not to do when you are a big company in control of a market. Basically:

    1) Don't ignore disruptive technologies thinking that you can use your market share/pricing control to slow adoption

    2) Don't make long-term promises to your employees or customers: Business moves so fast that you won't be able to keep them and still be competitive

    3) Less is always more when it comes to personnel... Most corporations are hopelessly bloated with people, and this fact alone slows the decision-making process

    I'm reading "Who says elephants can't dance" next to see how Gerstner fixes the problems. Perhaps there could be an update to this book that covers the Gerstner turnaround era and includes a bit of the Palmisano years?

  • This very readable book is the model that Gerstner should have followed. Elephants can do heavy towing, or push aside obstacles; they can't pirouette en pointe. This book is the viewpoint of IBM by an outside journalist. It lacks a table of contents. The book describes the problems, it does not tell when or why it originated.
    Page 20 says IBM developed "a lush bureaucracy that prided itself on having a higher ratio of managers per employee than any other business around." Is this what they teach in business school? IBM's chairmen came from the sales force; if you can't sell it, there's no point in making it. The IBM PC was created from off-the-shelf parts so it could be quickly marketed; pre-defined interfaces too! Page 24 tells how Microsoft did an operating system: they licensed QDOS (a replica of CP/M), then bought it. It eventually made Gates the richest man in America.
    Page 27 tells of the management problem in creating software. Architects spent months producing detailed designs for software. Then masses of programmers had a hard time deciphering the hundreds of pages of specifications. More time was spent in communicating than actually writing code! Isn't this a recipe for a project to be over budget and behind schedule? Estridge's habit of shunning meetings, not returning phone call, and ignoring unwanted advice could set an example of a well-ordered project manager who concentrates on the mission, not the housekeeping. Page 37 explains why standards for PCs began at birth.
    Page 53 mentions the "fear of nuclear attack" as the reason for moving out of New York city. But other companies also moved out in the 1970s; the fear of a nuclear attack drained away after the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Didn't IBM build a skyscraper in the 1980s only to sell it in the 1990s? Didn't AT&T do the same?
    Page 87 tells how Gates got lucky when VisiCorp began to self-destruct. Those familiar with counter-intelligence operations may think of another reason (p.192). Page 97 says IBM never wanted to have too many people in one spot. Unstated here is the fear that nearly all could walk out to a new company (p.186). Page 101 tells that IBM used lines of code as a measure of programming; what did IBM use to measure its management? Microsoft rewrote IBM code to make it faster and smaller, then; how are they doing now? The last pages of Chapter 8 deal with the OS/2-Windows politics. There is no explanation as to why they didn't share the same application interface. Page 201 tells of developing a RISC chip; didn't CDC do this in the early 1960s? Page 208 describes the chip development problem in Burlington VT. Page 217 mentions the "golden screwdriver" and how quickly some machines were upgraded. Think ahead!
    Pages 245-7 tell of the PS/1 project: crippled so it would not compete with PS/2. Would General Motors restrict the sale of Chevrolets to sell more Cadillacs? Page 281 suggests Microsoft moles reported on IBM's strategies. Pages 301-9 tell of the changes in Lexington under new owners. In political history, this is like a revolution that sweeps away the aristocracy and lets the farmers and merchants rise to power. Does the description of the IBM bureaucracy remind you of France before the Revolution? Will anyone write a book to cover the last ten years as well as this one does?