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by Benjamin Smith

ePub Hard Times in the Lands of Plenty: Oil Politics in Iran and Indonesia download
Author:
Benjamin Smith
ISBN13:
978-0801444395
ISBN:
080144439X
Language:
Publisher:
Cornell University Press (August 2, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Industries
ePub file:
1100 kb
Fb2 file:
1670 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr txt doc
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
600

Benjamin Smith has raised the costs for anyone hoping to tell us something new and significant about the role of oil in political development. With Hard Times in the Lands of Plenty he has all but cornered the market.

Benjamin Smith has raised the costs for anyone hoping to tell us something new and significant about the role of oil in political development. ―Robert Vitalis, University of Pennsylvania, author of America's Kingdom: Mythmaking on the Saudi Oil Frontier. Hard Times in the Lands of Plenty is thoughtful, provocative, and innovative. It is a richly textured exploration of political development in oil-exporting Iran and Indonesia

In Hard Times in the Land of Plenty, Benjamin Smith deciphers the paradox of the resource curse and questions . These two populous, oil-rich countries saw profoundly different changes in their fortunes in the period 1960-1980.

In Hard Times in the Land of Plenty, Benjamin Smith deciphers the paradox of the resource curse and questions its inevitability through an innovative comparison of the experiences of Iran and Indonesia. Focusing on the roles of state actors and organized opposition in using oil revenues, Smith finds that the effects of oil wealth on politics and on regime durability vary according to the circumstances under which oil exports became a major part of a country's economy.

In Hard Times in the Land of Plenty, Benjamin Smith deciphers the paradox of. .CHAPTER 1 Oil Wealth and Politics in the Developing World: Theories and Evidence. This book is concerned with the politics of oil wealth and how it shapes the abilities of rulers in oil-rich countries to deal with social dissent. The global oil market and its associated booms and busts have generated a large literature in political science.

That natural resources can be a curse as well as a blessing is almost a truism in political analysis. In many late-developing countries, the "resource curse" theory predicts, the exploitation of valuable resources will not result in stable, prosperous states but rather in their opposite

In Hard Times in the Land of Plenty, Benjamin Smith deciphers the paradox of the resource curse and questions its inevitability through an innovative comparison of the experiences of Iran and Indonesia.

Smith's book, Hard Times in the Lands of Plenty: Oil Politics in Iran and Indonesia was . in the Routledge Handbook of Oil Politics.

Smith's book, Hard Times in the Lands of Plenty: Oil Politics in Iran and Indonesia was published in 2007 by Cornell University Press. He has published articles on the politics of resource wealth in the American Journal of Political Science, Studies in Comparative International Development, Conflict Management and Peace Science, in The Oxford Handbook of State Transformations, and. In many late-developing countries, the "resource curse" theory predicts, the exploitation of valuable resources will not result in stable, prosperous states but rather in their opposite. Petroleum deposits, for example, may generate so much income that rulers will have little need to establish efficient, tax-extracting bureaucracies, leading to shallow

The shah of Iran fell ignominiously in 1979, whereas Indonesia's president, Suharto, lasted .

The shah of Iran fell ignominiously in 1979, whereas Indonesia's president, Suharto, lasted nearly two decades more. This analysis, which Smith extends in less detail to other oil-rich countries, leads him to conclude that the timing of oil wealth is all-important. Regrettably, this interesting book abounds in methodological discussion of greater interest to specialists than to the general reader. And although its historical analysis is rich, it contains little on contemporary Iran. More: Asia Environment. Hard Times in the Lands of Plenty: Oil Politics in Iran and Indonesia.

Hard times in the lands of plenty: oil politics in Iran and Indonesia. The origins of regional autonomy in Indonesia: Experts and the marketing of political interests. Cornell University Press, 2007. The wrong kind of crisis: Why oil booms and busts rarely lead to authoritarian breakdown. Studies in Comparative International Development (SCID) 40 (4), 55-76, 2006. Journal of East Asian Studies 8 (2), 211-234, 2008. Explaining anti-Chinese riots in late 20th century Indonesia. SR Panggabean, B Smith. World Development 39 (2), 231-242, 2011.

Read Online Download. Author(s): Benjamin Smith.

That natural resources can be a curse as well as a blessing is almost a truism in political analysis. In many late-developing countries, the "resource curse" theory predicts, the exploitation of valuable resources will not result in stable, prosperous states but rather in their opposite. Petroleum deposits, for example, may generate so much income that rulers will have little need to establish efficient, tax-extracting bureaucracies, leading to shallow, poorly functioning administrations that remain at the mercy of the world market for oil. Alternatively, resources may be geographically concentrated, thereby intensifying regional, ethnic, or other divisive tensions.

In Hard Times in the Land of Plenty, Benjamin Smith deciphers the paradox of the resource curse and questions its inevitability through an innovative comparison of the experiences of Iran and Indonesia. These two populous, oil-rich countries saw profoundly different changes in their fortunes in the period 1960–1980. Focusing on the roles of state actors and organized opposition in using oil revenues, Smith finds that the effects of oil wealth on politics and on regime durability vary according to the circumstances under which oil exports became a major part of a country's economy. The presence of natural resources is, he argues, a political opportunity rather than simply a structural variable.

Drawing on extensive primary research in Iran and Indonesia and quantitative research on nineteen other oil-rich developing countries, Smith challenges us to reconsider resource wealth in late-developing countries, not as a simple curse or blessing, but instead as a tremendously flexible source of both political resources and potential complications.