mostraligabue
» » Globalizing the Gatt: The Soviet Union's Successor States, Eastern Europe, and the International Trading System

ePub Globalizing the Gatt: The Soviet Union's Successor States, Eastern Europe, and the International Trading System download

by Leah A. Haus

ePub Globalizing the Gatt: The Soviet Union's Successor States, Eastern Europe, and the International Trading System download
Author:
Leah A. Haus
ISBN13:
978-0815735045
ISBN:
0815735049
Language:
Publisher:
Brookings Inst Pr (December 1, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
International
ePub file:
1666 kb
Fb2 file:
1268 kb
Other formats:
mobi rtf lit lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
267

Globalizing the GATT book. The explosive events in Eastern Europe and the dissolution of the Soviet Union have dramatically changed the political landscape that had existed for decades.

Globalizing the GATT book. The West must now develop new policies that are suitable for addressing the opportunities and challenges of the post-cold war world.

The explosive events in Eastern Europe and the dissolution of the Soviet Union have dramatically changed .

Drawing on documentary sources and extensive interviews with former and current officials from the European Community, the GATT secretariat, Hungary, Poland, and the Untied States, the author traces the historical origins and evolution of the Soviet and Eastern European countries' relations with the GATT from the 1940s to the present.

The main strength of this book is its narrative of the negotiations that brought Poland, Romania and Hungary into GATT and of the failed efforts by Bulgaria. Its weakness is that in correctly emphasizing the way political considerations dominated these matters it provides only a thin treatment of the problems created by the differences in national economic systems. Globalizing The Gatt: The Soviet Union's Successor States, Eastern Europe, And The International Trading System.

Enter Zip Code or city, state. Error: Please enter a valid ZIP code or city and state . Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more.

Items related to Globalizing the GATT: The Soviet Union's Successor. Haus shows that trade policy issues generally surfaced when strategic political objectives dictated cooperation with an eastern European country, and in these cases the negotiations became enmeshed in broader West-West conflicts over multilateral and bilateral trade practices.

Washington: Brookings Institution, 1992. Bowling Green State University. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 02 September 2013.

Globalizing the GATT: The Soviet Union's Successor States, Eastern Europe, and the International Trading . The mechanisms of a planned economy itself and the missing convertibility of national currencies limited the process just to the stage of bilateralism and pure trade exchange.

Globalizing the GATT: The Soviet Union's Successor States, Eastern Europe, and the International Trading System. In this way, multilateralism and factor integration could not be realized. What is more: This contributed to the economic decline of the Eastern bloc countries in the 1970s and 1980s. Satellites and Commissars: Strategy and Conflict in the Politics of Soviet- Bloc Trade.

See Leah A. Haus, Globalizing the GATT. The Soviet Union’s Successor States, Eastern Europe, and the International Trading System (Washington, DC: Brookings, 1992). 12. Susan M. Collins and Dan T. Rodrik, ‘Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union in the World Economy’, Policy Analyses in International Economics, no. 32 (Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics, 1991)Google Scholar. 13. András Inotai, ‘Central and Eastern Europe’, in . Henning, E. Hochreiter, and .

Haus L. Globalizing the GATT: the Soviet Union’s successor states, Eastern Europe, and the International trading system. The Brookings Institution, Washington, D. 1991. 5. International Trade Statistics Yearbook. u. rg/pb/ (дата обращения: 2. 2. 6. Mansfield E. D. Reinhardt E. Multilateral Determinants of Regionalism: The Effects of GATT/WTO on the Formation of Preferential Trading Arrangements // International Organization.

Haus, Leah (1992), Globalizing the GAT T: The Soviet Union’s Successor States, Eastern Europe and the International Trading System. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press

Haus, Leah (1992), Globalizing the GAT T: The Soviet Union’s Successor States, Eastern Europe and the International Trading System. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press. Henderson, D. (2000), Anti-Liberalism 2000, Wincot t Lecture, at ww w. m t h o lyo ke. e du /a c a d, i nt r e l, i p e, w in c o t t. ht m. Henkin, Louis (1968), How Nations Behave: Law and Foreign Policy. London: Pall Mall Press. Heydon, Ken (2011), The OECD: Lessons from Investment and Ser vices, in Bayne and Woolcock (2011).

The explosive events in Eastern Europe and the dissolution of the Soviet Union have dramatically changed the political landscape that had existed for decades. The West must now develop new policies that are suitable for addressing the opportunities and challenges of the post-cold war world. Globalizing the GATT describes the task of integrating the Soviet Union's successor states and Eastern European counties into the global economy and focuses on their participation in the international trade participation in the international trade institution, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Through a comparative analysis of the history of negotiations between the former Eastern European countries and the GATT, Leah Haus explains the current policy problems that must be addressed.Drawing on documentary sources and extensive interviews with former and current officials from the European Community, the GATT secretariat, Hungary, Poland, and the Untied States, the author traces the historical origins and evolution of the Soviet and Eastern European countries' relations with the GATT from the 1940s to the present.Haus demonstrates that economic issues have been less relevant to these negotiations than might be expected, because Western political-security concerns have predominated in the past. Strategic political objectives have driven Western policies when determining whether an eastern European country could affiliate with the GATT.Haus shows that trade policy issues generally surfaced when strategic political objectives dictated cooperation with an eastern European country, and in these cases the negotiations became enmeshed in broader West-West conflicts over multilateral and bilateral trade practices.