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ePub The Great Game of Business: Unlocking the Power and Profitability of Open-Book Management download

by Jack Stack

ePub The Great Game of Business: Unlocking the Power and Profitability of Open-Book Management download
Author:
Jack Stack
ISBN13:
978-0385475259
ISBN:
038547525X
Language:
Publisher:
Currency/ Doubleday (October 1, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
Management & Leadership
ePub file:
1937 kb
Fb2 file:
1843 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr lit docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
664

Stack's "open-book management" is the key - a system which, as he describes it here, is literally a. .

Stack's "open-book management" is the key - a system which, as he describes it here, is literally a game, and one so simple anyone can use it. As part of the Currency paperback line, the book includes a "User's Guide" - an introduction and discussion guide created for the paperback by the author - to help readers make practical use of the book's ideas. Jack Stack is the president and CEO of the Springfield Remanufacturing Corporation, in Springfield, Missouri

A pioneer of the leadership model known as Open Book Management, Stack is the . He has also written two books with Jack Stack. The first, The Great Game of Business, was named one of 100 best business books of all time.

A pioneer of the leadership model known as Open Book Management, Stack is the author of two books on the subject, The Great Game of Business and A Stake in the Outcome. The second, A Stake in the Outcome, has been called the first management classic of the new millennium.

Published July 16th 2013 by Crown Business. Author(s): Jack Stack

Stack's "open-book management" is the key - a system which, as he describes it here, is literally a. Jack Stack is the president and CEO of the Springfield Remanufacturing Corporation, in Springfield, Missouri

Open-book management (OBM) is a management phrase coined by John Case of Inc. magazine, who began using the term in 1993. The concept's most visible success has been achieved by Jack Stack and his team at SRC Holdings

Open-book management (OBM) is a management phrase coined by John Case of Inc. The concept's most visible success has been achieved by Jack Stack and his team at SRC Holdings. The basis of open-book management is that the information received by employees should not only help them do their jobs effectively, but help them understand how the company is doing as a whole

Even if an open-book management program is not what your organization currently needs, the issues Stack addresses and th.

The Great Game of Business : Unlocking the Power and Profitability of Open-Book Management. by Bo Burlingham and Jack Stack. This is called "Theory X," and assumes people are not to be trusted. With "Open Books," everyone can finally understand what The Great Game of Business. Even if an open-book management program is not what your organization currently needs, the issues Stack addresses and the questions he raises are still worthy of your thoughtful consideration.

Stack knew that traditional management practices weren’t going to turn .

Stack knew that traditional management practices weren’t going to turn around SRC any time soon. Put simply, Great Game companies open the books and teach everyone on staff how the business makes money. Employees then track, forecast and try to improve the key financials and operational numbers that determine company success. WHY IT’S A GAME The Great Game of Business is an open-book management system that takes the elements needed to win any game and applies them to the art and science of growing a successful business.

"A business should be run like an aquarium, where everybody can see what's going on-what's going in, what's moving around, what's coming out. That's the only way to make sure people understand what you're doing, and why, and have some input into deciding where you are going. Then, when the unexpected happens, they know how to react and react quickly

In the early 1980s, Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation (SRC) in Springfield, Missouri, was a  near bankrupt division of International Harvester.  That's when a green young manager, Jack Stack,  took over and turned it around. He didn't know how to  "manage" a company, but he did know about the  principal, of athletic competition and democracy:  keeping score, having fun, playing fair, providing  choice, and having a voice. With these principals  he created his own style of management --  open-book management. The key is to let everyone in on  financial decisions. At SRC, everyone learns how to  read a P&L -- even those without a high school  education know how much the toilet paper they use  cuts into profits. SRC people have a piece of the  action and a vote in company matters. Imagine  having a vote on your bonus and on what businesses the  company should be in. SRC restored the dignity of  economic freedom to its people. Stack's  "open-book management" is the key -- a system  which, as he describes it here, is literally  a game, and one so simple anyone can use  it. As part of the Currency paperback line, the  book includes a "User's Guide" -- an  introduction and discussion guide created for the  paperback by the author -- to help readers make  practical use of the book's ideas. Jack Stack is the  president and CEO of the Springfield Remanufacturing  Corporation, in Springfield, Missouri. The recipient  of the 1993 Business Enterprise Trust Award, Jack  speaks throughout the country on The  Great Game Of Business and Open  Book Management.
  • I am reading the book 16 years later, but the message is relevant. The basis of the book is Open-Book Management or sharing the critical numbers and the financials with your employees. I know the United States was in a recession when this book was written so I took seriously his explanations about not laying off people to be "lean and mean", but helping to create new opportunities and jobs.

    Not every chapter is great, some were dry and too much like a self-help book, but enough good chapters to make this book successful. The chapter on setting standards had good information about thinking how to control your costs and generate cash. I liked the advice of "Don't accept any number at face value". Meaning explore your metrics and make sure the right areas are being measured, numbers are not sacred.

    The other chapter I liked was Skip the Praise-Give us the Raise. This wasn't so much about giving a bonus, but thinking about how to give a bonus and understanding what needs to be accomplished to earn a bonus. I liked the advice of setting a goal based on the balance sheet and protecting your equity. Nice explanation in the book on how to do this.

    The book is fantastic for entrepreneurs or for owners of small companies that are growing or need to diversify. The book has many great tips on how to run a business and take care of your employees at the same time. Read this book in combination with "Managing by the Numbers" by Kremer, Rizzuto, and Case.

  • I have gotten a lot of good information from this book in building my consulting business. The author discusses his own experiences on building a business and how things might not go exactly the way we want them to if they do at all. In the world of business, nothing is a guarantee but what can be a guarantee is to wake up in the morning and tell yourself, "I can do what it takes to make it happen!" Just saying that will get you through the day because you are not opening yourself to high expectations. It is important to remember, when having high expectations they may not always be there and that will cause a downward spiral that just damages everything you have worked so hard to build. This book is what you need to get you through the day of building your business one step at a time.

  • As a General Manager faced with conducting turnarounds of struggling divisions of a Fortune 500 Corporation, this was my PROFIT bible! Now, as the founder of an investment company faced with resolving complex cash issues at our client companies, it is equally relevant. If you have a business of greater than 10 employees and over $1 MM in revenue, you will find the approaches inside extremely helpful in achieving your financial goals for the business.

    Jack Stack takes a practical, implementable approach to Open Book Management. In a nutshell, the theory is that if employees understand the numeric goals of a business, and how their own measurables contribute to those goals in a fun, competitive environment -- they will find new, creative ways to assist management in cranking out profit, additional sales revenue, and free cash flow. Having personalized this approach and implemented it myself in a number of organizations, I can vouch that this is absolutely the best way to improve the numbers that are so critical to your business success. Get your team involved -- Roll out the Great Game of Business TODAY!

  • Easy to read, concise, and well written. Main points are well organized and put into a story fashion to keep your attention. It provides good insight into how to run a business openly to fully utilize every employees' talents. It makes a good case for not keeping people in the dark. It has good insights into the motivation of employees. Caution, these principles would be very hard to implement in a large corporation, unless top management "buys in". The book shows the value in making work challenging and fun and more like a "game" with healthy competition. It identifies what "healthy" competition looks like, as opposed to keeping secrets, deception, threats, or games where nobody understands the real rules, which is destructive.