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by Po Chung

ePub Service Reborn download
Author:
Po Chung
ISBN13:
978-0984493883
ISBN:
0984493883
Language:
Publisher:
Lexingford Publishing (August 17, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Management & Leadership
ePub file:
1280 kb
Fb2 file:
1681 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
387

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Captured here are Po Chung's unique, tested, and often revolutionary ideas on service leadership principles and strategies focused on Asia but in fact transcending locale and industry sectors. He simultaneously offers Western business readers a clear window into Asian business thinking while offering Asian business people his insights on doing business globally.

Captured here are Po Chungs unique, tested, and often revolutionary ideas on service leadership principles and strategies focused on Asia but in fact transcending locale and industry sectors.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Po Chung books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 16 of 16 results.

In this book we wish to document the achievements in different institutions and highlight the specific projects with different foci. We earnestly hope that through the publication of this book, service leadership education can flourish in different service economies. Service leadership education for university students.

Dr Dr. Chung is also author of the Character Leadership book series which includes The First Ten Yards and Service Reborn

Po Chung is a co-founder of DHL Asia Pacific and Chairman Emeritus of DHL Express (Hong Kong) Ltd. He is passionate about the nature and value of service in world societies and global centers of commerce. His professional life has been dedicated in large part to understanding how to provide superb service, how to educate others as service leaders, and how to design and operate service-sector organizations. Dr. Chung is also author of the Character Leadership book series which includes The First Ten Yards and Service Reborn. Two new titles in the series, The 12 Dimensions of a Service Leader and 25 Principles of Service Leadership, will be published in 2015.

This book outlines the development of service leadership curricula, programs and materials designed for university students in Hong . I would also like to thank Dr. Po Chung for instigating the Fung Service Leadership Initiative

This book outlines the development of service leadership curricula, programs and materials designed for university students in Hong Kong. In addition, it includes evaluation studies and specific service leadership programs, making it a pioneering book that integrates service leadership and student wellbeing for Chinese university students. Po Chung for instigating the Fung Service Leadership Initiative. Lastly, let me take this opportunity to thank all distinguished speakers, organizers and the Organizing Committee for their effort and support.

12 Goffman, Erving, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Anchor Book, New York, 1959.

Chung, P Service Reborn: the Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes of Service Companies Lexingford, New York, 2012. Drucker, Peter, The Age of Discontinuity Heinemann, London, 1968. Goffman, Erving, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Anchor Book, New York, 1959. chapters 2 & 6) Haifetz, Ronald Alexander Grashow, and Marty Linsky, The Practice of Adaptive Leadership: Tools and Tactics for Changing Your Organization and the World, Harvard Business Press, Boston, Mass. 2009 Heifetz, Ronald.

Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read. Po Chung,Roger Bowie.

Captured here are Po Chung's unique, tested, and often revolutionary ideas on service leadership principles and strategies focused on Asia but in fact transcending locale and industry sectors. He simultaneously offers Western business readers a clear window into Asian business thinking while offering Asian business people his insights on doing business globally. He was among the first to recognize the tectonic shift in many regions of global business from a manufacturing, product-based model to a service, process-based economy. As Po points out, the GDP of many global business hubs now stems primarily from service revenue, not manufacturing income. The heart of Po’s message, therefore, has to do with a true game-changer: understanding the service economy in all its forms, then redesigning both business and business education to make the most of that new economy. Around that core concept Po builds a support structure of associated guidelines and principles, including his original perspectives on business habitats, Personal Operating Systems, organizational DNA, dangerous “viruses” to business processes, and a host of other linked concerns. Together, these topics rise to the stature of a new vision for building service businesses, nurturing human capital, and relating with conscience to one’s clientele and society.
  • Po Chung has given business educators some important points to consider in re-engineering global business schools to help fill the gap between what schools teach and business managers want in new hires.

    Po succinctly summarizes the problem that schools mostly teach "to count and control" from an outdated manufacturing perspective. Most major regions engaged in global commerce are focused on service and knowledge based businesses. Po points out that while Hong Kong was a manufacturing hub in the 1970's and 80's,it has transformed into a service/knowledge economy with four out of five jobs in service and 93% of GDP from service revenue.

    This book provides invaluable common sense insights into successful service management based on Po's extensive business experience. But his most important contribution for business educators is his plea to re-orient the student experience to become better able to meet the challenge of the service/information economy. Most schools focus on "the knowing" (models, formulas, and systems approaches to management; some are integrating "the doing" (service based learning, internships, and in-class projects); the most innovative schools are also focused on "the being" (leadership, implementation of ideas, self-awareness). Po's book supports the integration of all of these skill sets into the whole person approach to education that global managers are demanding from business schools.

    "Service Reborn" should be included in the canon of new books that can help transform education for the benefit of global prosperity and ensuring productive careers for business students everywhere.

  • Review of Service Reborn

    Having served as a professor of communication for nearly 40 years, the skill that I most value and promote belongs to active listeners and interviewers who keep their counterparts at the forefront of conversations, helping them to unpack the scope and depth of their ideas. In Service Reborn, derived from extended conversations with Po Chung, co-founder of DHL International and Chairman of the Hong Kong Institute of Service Leadership & Management, professor and publisher, Art Bell, explores with Chung the importance of adapting the standards of service established by the business entrepreneur's global transportation and shipping company. Their dialogue presents for organizations a tutorial for understanding the broad character and impact of establishing the highest standards of service. Through these collected interviews, the reader comes to understand how Po's perspective of offering outstanding service comes to define the culture and success of an organization.

    Led by Bell, these engaging interviews condemn the increasing depersonalization of key industries, including banking, medical, legal, educational, and governmental institutions, and present, in their stead, models for honoring the essential and humanizing role of providing superior customer, public, and employee service. The wisdom of Po presents must reading for leaders who recognize that quality service creates the cornerstone of best organizational practices.

    Rick Isaacson, Ph.D.
    Service-Learning Director
    Dept. of Communication Studies
    San Francisco State University

    [email protected]

  • I ran across this book inadvertently. My wife owns a small business (a music school) and consults with a free business advisor in the city where we live. He recommended that that she read Service Reborn. The book was sitting around my house for several months before I had a look at it. As a graduate student, I'm usually not drawn to books on business and management, so I didn't pay it any particular attention. When I finally picked it up and started reading, I devoured it in a day! To my surprise, Po Chung's book was not only engaging and readable; it was also directly relevant to my own life.

    When I hear the words "service industry," I usually think of waiting tables. The essential point of Service Reborn is that "service" needs to be construed much more broadly than most people realize. The service economy constitutes a large and rapidly growing portion of the world economy, especially in developed nations. It includes pretty much every industry not directly related to manufacturing and production - health care, education, hospitality, IT...the list goes on and on. My wife, for instance, had not thought of herself as a "service provider" before reading this book.

    Chung points out how traditional models of management were conceived in terms of the manufacturing industries, and how they need to be reexamined in light of the service economy. Services necessitate a shift away from the hierarchical mindset of the factory, toward more decentralized and equitable style of decision-making. This entails greater attention to the "softer" virtues of management. Chung is especially disdainful toward the authoritarian "Tiger Mom" style of management, or what he calls "Management by Getting Mad" (MGM).

    "Service" encompasses more than just a wide range of important and innovative industries; it also encompasses our own personal brands, what Chung calls "Me, Incorporated." He makes the excellent point that every individual is essentially an entrepreneur in the service industry, regardless of occupation. This is especially pertinent to my own concerns as I prepare to enter the working world. For this reason I recommend Service Reborn to anyone looking to upgrade their professional lives, not only business owners and managers.

    Because we are all in the "service industry" whether we like it or not, there can be no hard-and-fast distinction between our professional and our personal lives. On the one hand, "service" can connote "providing a service for a fee"; on the other, it can mean "serving humanity; fulfilling one's dreams and ambitions in society." Throughout the book, Chung riffs on this double meaning, drawing on the teachings of both Eastern and Western philosophers. Although some, especially Westerners, might be uncomfortable with the conflation of management with morality, I found this aspect of the book particularly refreshing and interesting. Management books tend to focus on "what we can get from others"; Chung encourages the reader to think in terms of "what we can give to others."