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ePub Measuring Marketing: 110+ Key Metrics Every Marketer Needs download

by John A. Davis

ePub Measuring Marketing: 110+ Key Metrics Every Marketer Needs download
Author:
John A. Davis
ISBN13:
978-1118153741
ISBN:
111815374X
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley; 2 edition (February 11, 2013)
Category:
Subcategory:
Marketing & Sales
ePub file:
1451 kb
Fb2 file:
1922 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt lit mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
190

It discusses the key marketing metrics needed for successfully measuring the performance of an organization's marketing investments.

Measuring Marketing helps marketers figure out what they can and should be measuring and when.

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John Davis -Measuring Marketing 110+ Key Metrics Every Marketer Needs.

Evaluating marketing performance and decision making more fairly Marketing has long been considered an art and not a science, but that perception is beginning to change as increasingly sophisticated methods of quantifying marketing success are developed.

metrics · Measuring marketing. Your advice on this decision is needed

metrics · Measuring marketing. effectiveness · Long-term assets and short-. Your advice on this decision is needed. Maximum overall page count: 18 pages. Module specification: Mastering Metrics Ó CIM October 2014. a) Determine the key marketing metrics which are affecting the organisation at this point of potential expansion or merger. Evaluate the impact of these factors on both the marketing decision making of the organisation and at least TWO wider business functions.

Evaluating marketing performance and decision making more fairly

Marketing has long been considered an art and not a science, but that perception is beginning to change as increasingly sophisticated methods of quantifying marketing success are developed. In Measuring Marketing: 103 Key Metrics Every Marketer Needs, Second Edition, one of the world's leading experts in the field presents the key marketing ratios and metrics. Applying these metrics will enable marketers to make better decisions and increase their accountability for their strategies and activities.

This fully revised and updated new edition discusses the key marketing metrics needed for successfully measuring the performance of an organization's marketing investments. CEOs and CFOs regularly ask for one simple way to assess the efficacy of marketing campaigns, but the fact is that there isn't one single measure of performance. Measuring Marketing helps marketers figure out what they can and should be measuring and when.

Marketers are increasingly being held accountable for the corporate bottom line, and this book helps both marketers, as well as the business leaders who employ them, to measure performance fairly and accurately Measuring marketing success is difficult, but this book shows what and when to assess Designed to increase accountability and improve everyday decisions, the book includes ratios illustrated with actual marketing cases from leading companies

The first book to address growing demands that marketers be accountable for their strategies and decisions, Measuring Marketing explains how to assess marketing success in more meaningful ways.

  • John Davis provides an overview of commonly used business metrics that he subdivides in three categories: 1) Marketing Planning and Customers; 2) The Offering; and 3) Sales Force. Davis usually explains clearly each metric that he covers by sequentially examining the measurement need, solution, and impact on decision making. Most of the time, Davis gives a clear example that helps readers put the theory into practice. Some metrics in the third section such as Four Factor Model and Sales Variance Analysis will be somewhat challenging to readers who are not very comfortable with numbers.

    To his credit, Davis is straightforward about the difficulties that readers can experience in collecting some of the information needed to use some of the metrics under review. Davis also cautions his audience against the danger of blindly using industry averages because each company has its own DNA. Davis is at his weakest when he presents an overview of key Internet metrics such as gross page impressions, cost per click, and cost per action. The coverage of these metrics is too superficial to be of any use to any reader who is looking for more than the basics. To summarize, "Measuring Marketing 103 Key Metrics Every Marketer Needs" is a good reference book for a quick education about some of the most commonly used business metrics.

  • Marketing managers are being challenged today more so than ever before to develop marketing plans which will work towards accomplishing a company's goals and objectives as presented in its overall strategic initiatives. The level of turbulence in the competitive environment is extremely high and all of the functional areas of a company must be in tune in order for your company to be the one that is creating the turbulence which your competitors are having to contend with.

    I found Measuring Marketing 103 Key Metrics Every Marketer Needs by John Davis to prove to be an excellent resource to utilize in planning for successful projects in all elements of the Marketing Mix; product, price, place (including marketing channels), and promotion as well as for other functional areas of the company outside of marketing. The book and its 103 metrics (measurements) is divided into 3 broad sections: Marketing Planning and Customers, which includes some basic financial ratios as well as measurements which are more marketing or customer oriented; The Offering, which contains measurements to gauge the productivity of elements of the Marketing Mix for projects and initiatives; and finally Sales Force, with productive measuring equations as well as sales compensation strategy comparison measurements.

    Every measurement is presented in 3 distinctive sections:

    1. Measurement Need: The purpose or useful function of the measurement to marketing managers.

    2. The Solution: Details of the measurement equations including individual elements needed to calculate the measurement. This section is presented in straight forward, easy to understand fashion with good examples.

    3. Impact on Decision Making: Demonstrates how to utilize the data which is compiled in each measurement's solution section in context of the information needed by the marketing manager.

    Some of the measurement elements are presented as a broader overview which invites the reader to develop their own critical thinking into how the measurement solution can apply to their individual project, company, or industry. I will be keeping my copy of the John Davis book at my office to utilize as an advantageous resource as I am working through various strategic marketing projects.

  • I loveeeeeeee this textbook because the chapters are not long and drawn out with unnecessary amounts of examples and explanations. It gets straight to the point and I can read it from my Kindle Fire instead of carrying a bulky textbook around

  • A great book and an easy to read on a very complex topic. get it.

  • This book reminds me a lot of my introductory managerial accounting textbook, with numerous clever formulas for measuring internal management figures and with theory and explanations behind these. Instead, this book is a dictionary of formulas, and without very good theory.

    Some of its formulas are straightforward. For example Return on Sales = (Net Profit Before Taxes) divided by (Sales). Others will yield uncertain results, due to garbage in garbage out. For example Sales = (P1 X N1) + (P2 X N2) where P1 = customer probability of buying if committed N1 = number of committed buyers P2 = customer probability of buying if uncommitted N2 = number of uncommitted buyers. Uncertainty arises from determining who is actually committed.

    Unlike managerial accounting, the numbers required here are much harder to accurately attain. Thereby, the book's "exact mathematical" definitions are subject to high imprecision. The challenge in this discipline is collecting the right numbers, and this book doesn't teach this.

    This book is effective for bedtime browsing-reading to learn the terminologies used in quantitative, large firm's marketing conversations.