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ePub Just Good Business: The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Responsibility and Brand download

by Kellie A. McElhaney

ePub Just Good Business: The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Responsibility and Brand download
Author:
Kellie A. McElhaney
ISBN13:
978-1576754412
ISBN:
1576754413
Language:
Publisher:
Berrett-Koehler Publishers; 1 edition (November 10, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Marketing & Sales
ePub file:
1723 kb
Fb2 file:
1606 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf mobi lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
997

Kellie McElhaney is the John C. Whitehead Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Corporate Responsibility and founding director of the Center for Responsible Business at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. She developed and launched the center in January 2003.

Kellie McElhaney is the John C. She consults to many Fortune 500 companies and was named a 2005 Faculty Pioneer for Institutional Leadership in the Aspen Institute's biennial report Beyond Grey Pinstripes.

Just Good Business book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Just Good Business: The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Responsibility and Brand as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The book’s case vignettes, examples, best practices, and strategic recommendations span a host of industries and sectors, and draw upon McElhaney’s work with leading corporations like McDonalds, Nokia, Medtronic, Levi, Wells Fargo, Birkenstock, Gap, In. HP, and Pepperidge Farm. Savvy companies carefully manage their brand in every area-CSR shouldn’t be any different.

The subtitle of the book, The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Social Responsibility and Brand, could not be more .

The subtitle of the book, The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Social Responsibility and Brand, could not be more appropriate. A key theme throughout the book is the need to connect your CSR efforts to your core business, and again there are plenty of examples of both success and suicide by the business elite. Kellie McElhaney has done the world of business a great service by providing leaders with a well-written, actionable guide to branding their corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. There have been plenty of books extolling the many benefits to companies of pursuing CSR.

In Just Good Business, Kellie McElhaney shows leaders and managers .

In Just Good Business, Kellie McElhaney shows leaders and managers exactly how to connect their CSR efforts to their company's overall corporate strategy, business objectives, and core competencies. McElhaney's book draws on over ten years of previously unpublished CSR consulting engagements inside companies grappling with developing strategically aligned CSR initiatives.

Kellie A. McElhaney Haas was rated in the world for corporate responsibility by The Financial .

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, Haas School of Business. Dr. McElhaney is on faculty as a Distinguished Teaching Fellow and the Founding Director of the Center for Equity, Gender and Inclusion (EGAL) at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley. Haas was rated in the world for corporate responsibility by The Financial Times. She received the Founder and Visionary Award at Haas in 2013 for this work. Kellie wrote a book entitled Just Good Business: The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Responsibility and Brand.

7 part i Corporate Social Responsibility Just Good Business Part I discusses the current state of the art of. .Remember: a lot of CSR is out there in the business world, but not a lot of it is effective CSR.

7 part i Corporate Social Responsibility Just Good Business Part I discusses the current state of the art of corporate social responsibility (CSR) what it is, why companies should integrate it into their business strategies, and why they should do it now. You will learn how to develop effective CSR strategies, how to align your company s core objectives, competencies, and stakeholder expectations, and how to maximize CSR s value within the firm.

McElhaney draws on over ten years of previously unpublished CSR consulting engagements inside companies grappling with developing strategically aligned CSR initiatives. The book’s case vignettes, examples, best practices, and strategic recommendations span a host of industries and sectors and draw upon her work with leading corporations, such as McDonald’s, Nokia, Levi Strauss, Digicel, Birkenstock, Gap In.

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) can help companies build customer loyalty, recruit and retain employees, and stand out in a crowded marketplace. But to be most effective, CSR must be intimately connected to the corporate brand—it must reinforce a company’s unique identity and be an integral part of how a company tells its story. How can your company make the most of this potential competitive advantage and business strategy? Kellie McElhaney, one of the world’s leading experts on CSR strategy, offers a detailed process for seamlessly integrating your CSR efforts into your overall business objectives. “My goal,” she writes, “is not to tell you how to force your CSR strategy to be more authentic. My goal is actually to help you develop a CSR strategy that is authentic because of its natural linkage to your company’s mission, vision, and values.” Just Good Business lays out a framework of seven principles that help you develop CSR initiatives that make good business sense and tell the world about them in ways that are compelling and memorable. McElhaney offers a wealth of practical advice on implementation, including how to measure the results of your CSR. McElhaney draws on over ten years of previously unpublished CSR consulting engagements inside companies grappling with developing strategically aligned CSR initiatives. The book’s case vignettes, examples, best practices, and strategic recommendations span a host of industries and sectors and draw upon her work with leading corporations, such as McDonald’s, Nokia, Levi Strauss, Digicel, Birkenstock, Gap Inc., HP, and Pepperidge Farm. Savvy companies carefully manage their brand in every area. CSR shouldn’t be any different. Just Good Business offers a detailed blueprint that any company can use to ensure that its CSR strategy delivers significant, quantifiable, bottom-line benefits.
  • McEleheney doesn't waste any time getting right into the meat of her business-minded approach to corporate social responsibility and sustainability. Just Good Business is a roadmap for any size organization to shorten the learning curve when engaging in CSR efforts. There are plenty of good-intentioned corporate leaders who fall into the trap of trying to fool customers and stakeholders with distant and unconnected CSR programs like planting trees or mailing out holiday cards linked to a charitable donation program. McElhaney provides a clear, proactive and formulaic approach to avoiding such embarrassing forays. The book is full of real life case examples from top companies that she has advised. The subtitle of the book, The Strategic Guide to Aligning Corporate Social Responsibility and Brand, could not be more appropriate. A key theme throughout the book is the need to connect your CSR efforts to your core business, and again there are plenty of examples of both success and suicide by the business elite.

    CSR is often viewed with some skepticism in the business world, but there is nothing naïve in her approach or advice. She has been at this game long enough to know what works, and what doesn't, and this book a compilation of her knowledge and experience in both academia and industry. Just Good Business is written in the style of a good management book, and will be easily understood by executives looking for the boiled-down version of her 15 years of pioneering work in this field. The content is filled with first-hand knowledge of how to sell a CSR program internally, as well as a complete formula for development, implementation and measurement. There is nothing in this text that conflicts with making money, shareholder primacy or efficiency. It is all about building trusted brands that build value. `Best of all, the chapters are short and sweet for reading on the train, plane or in the hotel.

    Paul A. King, Sustainability Executive
    Bovis Lend Lease

  • Not sure the University will let me (I'm in Asia) but I want to have my students read this in addition to their textbook, and use it as the center piece for a project (while they trudge through all the boring minutia of their textbook). This was a really quick read that was easy to understand and remarkably focused in a way that should excite them to action. It's the businesses can do well by doing good model, but goes into the particulars of how it has to be modeled if it's going to work in the long run, where the other books I've read on the same topic do not.

  • Very interesting book.

  • An excellent summary of how companies can execute a "win-win" CSR strategy. The writing style is clear and succinct. I would love to see the author update it (e.g. post financial crisis, new examples).

  • Execellent book, well written and very insightful. Lots of practical examples to aid understanding and a clear approach to how to implement a CSR plan in my business.

  • McElhaney's key point: It's not enough to have CSR (corporate social responsibility) initiatives in place; they have to be strategic, thorough, and properly marketed:

    Strategic: aligned with-and actually fostering-the company's overall goals. CSR initiatives need to be consistent with other branding, add to the bottom line (or at least not subtract from it), and demonstrate benefit not only to the community but to the company itself (not had to do, as I point out in my own book, Principled Profit)

    Thorough: able to withstand accusations/investigations of "greenwashing"

    Properly marketed: Once you've got the initiatives in place, tell the story to all your stakeholders: top brass, line employees, customers, suppliers, neighbors, etc. Even better: get your nonprofit partners to tell your story for you, and give them the support they need to develop and disseminate those marketing messages.

    The effects can be astonishing. She shares two stories from a cell phone company called Digicell whose success and not only doing but communicating CSR had a clear positive impact on profitability: During the 2008 food riots in Haiti, local residents protected their stores through community policing efforts, even as stores on either side were burned and looted. When the CEO, Denis O'Brien, was one of several cell phone providers chosen to make a 10-minute pitch to the Nicaraguan government, President Daniel Ortega interrupted his presentation and told him, "Listen, I know wheat you have done for the people and the communities of Jamaica and Haiti. We would be honored to have your company serve not only our mobile telecommunications needs but also the needs of our communities." WOW!

    She frequently cites Pedigree dog food as a company that understands the power of thoroughly incorporating CSR into its core mission AND its branding. Visit that company's website and you can't miss the attention to adopting homeless dogs: a perfect message for a dog food maker, and a strong creator of consumer loyalty.

    Interestingly, she spends a lot of energy discussing companies that have not always been perceived as good corporate citizens, including Wal-Mart and Dow Chemical. Perhaps, she seems to imply, those companies cans how their sincerity and turn public opinion to their favor, much as Nike did.

    The book winds up with action steps, a comprehensive (if somewhat repetitive) section on measuring the results of CSR on profitability, and a look at the CSR big picture and future trends.

    Highly recommended.

    Shel Horowitz is the award-winning author of Principled Profit: Marketing That Puts People First, which shows how to succeed in business through ethical, Green approaches.