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ePub Potential download

by Ariel Schrag

ePub Potential download
Author:
Ariel Schrag
ISBN13:
978-0943151045
ISBN:
094315104X
Language:
Publisher:
SLG Publishing (March 2, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Comic Strips
ePub file:
1466 kb
Fb2 file:
1791 kb
Other formats:
lit azw doc txt
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
931

Ariel Schrag (born December 29, 1979) is an American cartoonist and television writer who achieved critical recognition at an early age for her autobiographical comics.

Ariel Schrag (born December 29, 1979) is an American cartoonist and television writer who achieved critical recognition at an early age for her autobiographical comics. While attending Berkeley High School in Berkeley, California, Schrag self-published her first comic series, Awkward, depicting events from her freshman year, originally selling copies to friends and family. Schrag then published three more graphic novels based on her next three years of school: Definition, Potential, and Likewise

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Ariel Schrag continues her tumultuous passage through high school in the second book of her acclaimed series of frank.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. High School Comic Chronicles). by. Ariel Schrag (Goodreads Author).

Ariel Schrag continues her tumultuous passage through high school in the second book of her acclaimed series of frank, insightful, and painfully honest autobiographical graphic novels.

Ariel Schrag continues her tumultuous passage through high school in the second book of her acclaimed series of frank, . .The High School Comic Chronicles of Ariel Schrag. Written during the summer following her junior year at Berkeley High School in California, Potential recounts Ariel's first real relationship and first-time love with a girl, her quest to lose her virginity to a boy, and her parents' divorce - as well as the personal and social complications of writing about her life as she lives it.

Flag as Inappropriate. Ariel Schrag at the WeHo Book Fair 2010. Potential: The High School Comic Chronicles of Ariel Schrag (2008, Touchstone, ISBN 978-1-4165-5235-2). Likewise: The High School Comic Chronicles of Ariel Schrag (2009, Touchstone, ISBN 978-1-4165-5237-6). Adam: A Novel (2014, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, ISBN 978-0-5441-4293-0).

Potential by Ariel Schrag - Ariel Schrag continues her tumultuous passage through high school in the second book of her acclaimed series of frank, insightful . Price may vary by retailer. Ariel Schrag continues her tumultuous passage through high school in the second book of her acclaimed series of frank, insightful, and painfully honest autobiographical graphic novels.

  • "Science is my life!" heroine Ariel proclaims early on in Potential, and it's true. The junior in high school loves her science classes and even tries to figure out with a friend how to distill homemade alcohol--something she thinks would be both a good learning experience and fun.

    But there are other, more pressing issues that Ariel must deal with in her junior year of high school. For one thing, she had settled on the label of bisexual after her sophomore year experiences, but she's definitely feeling more and more drawn to the lesbian side. Now if only she could figure out how to navigate the tricky emotional waters of dating during the teenage years.

    Ariel Schrag's true-life series of work--which began with freshman year in Awkward and continued in sophomore year's Definition--is as brave as it is funny. Schrag completed each work in the summer after each respective school year, not only putting her own life squarely under the microscope, but also telling the stories of her friends, family, and acquaintances. As her classmates at Berkeley High School in the mid- to late '90s learned, nothing was secret or sacred.

    Schrag's abilities both as an artist and a storyteller have greatly improved by the time of Potential. Awkward was a potpourri of images, sometimes far too crowded for one page, but Definition showed real evolution in her work. With Potential, she allows herself plenty of room in which to pace her story, starting slowly with her puppy love relationship with a boy and moving on to the more complicated territory of her lesbian dating life and the emotional effects of her parents' divorce.

    Potential, like the work that preceded it, succeeds on several levels, not least of which is that Schrag doesn't rehash coming-of-age tales we've read before. Instead, it's a fresh take on teen years, one set in a modern age where homosexuality doesn't have to be hidden. That doesn't necessarily make it any easier for the author, but it's refreshing for the reader to follow a young woman who's confident in her own sense of self.

    Schrag doesn't shy away from mature themes in her work, nor does she sugarcoat it. She offers an honest account of the awkwardness and thrills of discovering one's self and one's sexual identity. It's a bonus that all of this is coupled with a more daring (and often quite strikingly beautiful) drawing style. Schrag can go from cartoony to chiaroscuro within a page, which mirrors the complexities of her story.

    It's a wonderful experience growing up with Schrag and experiencing her teen years vicariously. Later this year, Touchstone will release Likewise, where senior year hits and the story of Schrag's high-school career comes to an end. One can only hope that her post-high-school years were as eventful and fun as this, and that Schrag will decide to keep entertaining us with her wit.

    -- John Hogan

  • In my opinion, POTENTIAL is the best of all four books. Maybe I'm biased because I read it whilst coming out and it instilled a sense of confidence that really helped me get laid. Or maybe because it's fun and personal. It's got enough high school drama to be interesting, but not enough to become REAL high school drama (the kind you can't even relate to anymore). In fact, POTENTIAL is extremely easy to relate to, even now. So, basically, the reason is not important. It's just really good at making you feel re-attached to some part of you that you left behind.

  • I have to admit, the style of artwork put me off this book the first times I picked it up. Then I found it at discount and figured, "what the heck?" Well, I had the same initial response to Dilbert and was wrong about that, too.

    This second of three high school diaries, all in graphic-novel form, gives a realistically gritty idea of what teens go through when finding an identity, losing a virginity, and generally riding the emotional and hormonal roller coaster of mid-teen years. In Schrag's case, there was the additional pressure of being a girl who liked girls, mitigated by a relatively tolerant California environment in which to establish herself. (That just made it even more annoying to need a boy for that virginity thing. I found the 'SHOVE' moment wonderfully exressive.) Then there's the self-referential aspect of the writing of this comic appearing during the story that it tells.

    The visual style comes across a bit raw and ragged, but that seems emotionally true to Schrag's raw and ragged experience of her world. A few dream sequences appear in an ironically realistic style - in fact, even her daydreams seem more realistic than her reality.

    If you expect "a day in the life" to make sense, then you probably have slim experience of either teens or girls. But, if you're willing to hang on through the ups and downs, it's a worthwhile ride.

    -- wiredweird

  • Ariel Schrag's work, POTENTIAL, is a must-read for anybody who has ever been to high school. She tells it how it is - from losing her virginity to smearing goat excrement on a boy's face to endear herself to her girlfriend. Absolutely amazing; if you've ever loved Harriet the spy's adventures, this is for you - in this 200-page tome, Ariel gives the upper East side's favorite young spy a run for her money; Ariel's stories are all true, and told with scientific precision.

  • This is an incredible book; the art/graphics are impressive, and the content is amazing! This book would be enjoyable to high school students and adults alike. I wish I had had the opportunity to read this when in high school.

    Ariel Schrag skillfully depicts the many challenges, joys, and experiences of young lesbians in high school (and beyond). She not only portrays her high school experience, first love and her first break up, she wittily comments on the complexities of the formation of her sexual identity, and exposes the real (and raw) anxiety and depression experienced by many students in high school. This book delves into the personal and social pressures of loosing ones virginity, trying to understand virginity as a young lesbian/queer youth, and makes several valiant attempts to identify the all but inscrutable definition of lesbiansex. All of this is done with a great deal vulnerability and humor. The honesty soaking these pages is refreshing. This is an extraordinary piece of art.

    If young LGBTQ youth could find this book in their high school libraries, they might feel a little less alone and their lives might just feel just a little less complicated.

  • This is the book that made me fall in love with Schrag's work. I found it comical; I think I enjoyed this book a bit too much because I actually related to how Ariel was feeling / thinking throughout her junior year of high school. I also read her other graphic novels and I have enjoyed them as well. i would definately recomend reading.