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ePub Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? download

by Brian Fies

ePub Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? download
Author:
Brian Fies
ISBN13:
978-0810996366
ISBN:
0810996367
Language:
Publisher:
Harry N. Abrams (July 1, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Graphic Novels
ePub file:
1151 kb
Fb2 file:
1913 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi mbr lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
228

Brian Fies is a writer and cartoonist of the award-winning graphic novels Mom’s Cancer and Whatever Happened .

Brian Fies is a writer and cartoonist of the award-winning graphic novels Mom’s Cancer and Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? Although he lost his home, he and his wife are rebuilding in Santa Rosa, California.

Start by marking Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? as Want to Read . I first saw this book portrayed in near-ash form in Brian Fies story about losing his home in one of the Northern California wildfires in 2017

Start by marking Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I first saw this book portrayed in near-ash form in Brian Fies story about losing his home in one of the Northern California wildfires in 2017. I encourage everyone to find that work A Fire Story in one or more of the finished products: initial sketchbook web comic, animated short of the web comic, fleshed out book (including stories from others). Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? is an award-winning, detail-packed, creative marvel.

Beginning with the World’s Fair of 1939 and continuing through the ages to. .

In the beginning, he talks about the chaotically fluid time in comic books - the idea that Clark Kent has been pretty much the same age from 1939 on, an eternal present that can include the past or future for story purposes.

Illustrator and author Brian Fies was a bit of a pioneer when, in 2004, he launched his . However, Fies’ oeuvre certain runs beyond Mom’s Cancer.

Illustrator and author Brian Fies was a bit of a pioneer when, in 2004, he launched his autobiographical and very personal graphic novel Mom’s Cancer to the Web. While certainly other comic book artists were making comics for the Web well before that time, Fies arrived right at the cusp of when major awards-giving bodies started recognizing the artistic and literary potential of online comics. He is also the author of Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?, a 2009 graphic novel which is now making its paperback appearance for the first time.

Additional formats: Paperback, Ebook

Additional formats: Paperback, Ebook. Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?, the long-awaited follow-up to Mom's Cancer, is a unique graphic novel that tells the story of a young boy and his relationship with his father. Interspersed with the comic book adventures of Commander Cap Crater (created by Fies to mirror the styles of the comics and the time periods he is depicting), and mixing art and historical photographs, this groundbreaking graphic novel is a lively trip through a half century of technological evolution. It is also a perceptive look at the changing moods of our nation-and the enduring promise of the future

Mom's Cancer' cartoonist Brian Fies returns with 'Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?' a graphic novel about 50.

Mom's Cancer' cartoonist Brian Fies returns with 'Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?' a graphic novel about 50 years of American progress as seen through the eyes of a father & son. We spoke with Fies. CBR News spoke with Fies about the World of Tomorrow, changing American attitudes, and fun facts about paper. Fies's previous book, "Mom's Cancer," was based on his own experiences coping with his mother's illness. With "Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow," the inspiration is less obvious.

Spanning the period from the 1939 New York World's Fair to the last Apollo space mission in 1975, it is told through the eyes of a boy as he grows up in an era that was optimistic and ambitious, fueled by industry, engines, electricity, rockets, and the atom bomb.

Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" is a 1986 American comic book story published by DC Comics, featuring the superhero Superman

Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?" is a 1986 American comic book story published by DC Comics, featuring the superhero Superman.

Perhaps what I found most distracting about the book was Buddy and his defiance of time. Buddy is clearly not meant to represent any one person. He's a young boy in 1939, and he's only reached his teen years by the mid-1970s. His name along is a cue. Fies is Buddy. Wouldn't you like to be a Buddy too? I get where Fies is going with that approach. I think it undermines his storytelling, though. The reminders that Buddy is a stand-in make him less of a character. I didn't want to be reminded that he was a device.

Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?, the long-awaited follow-up to Mom's Cancer, is a unique graphic novel that tells the story of a young boy and his relationship with his father.
  • If you haven't gotten your father a Father's Day present yet, this graphic novel could be perfect, especially if Dad is a baby-boomer. Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow is a winner, a deep, sweet meditation on America's conflicted loved affair with science and space.
    Each chapter covers a decade, starting in 1939 with New York World's Fair. A boy named Buddy goes with his Pop to the Fair. We see the vast, optimistic, post-Depression worlds of the future through Buddy's eyes. Buddy and Pop do not age in real time, and the phases of human development match the phases of technological advancement as the book progresses.
    While Fies tells us the smaller, personal story of Buddy's growing up, he uses Buddy's favorite comic book, Space Age Adventures, to show us what is happening in society. The escapades of Commander Cap Crater and the Cosmic Kid parallel Buddy's relationship with his father, and it is in these pages the Fies lets his subversive sense of humor roam. Crater faces giant robots, mutated prairie dogs, and a shrinking-ray in his quests to save the world, while the arch-villain spouts the purplest of comic-book prose. I don't know if Fies read comics as a kid, but that is the most reasonable explanation for his loving detail in these pages, and his firm grasp of the stylistic changes through the decades.
    We see Buddy waiting through World War II for his dad's return; confronting the H-bomb paranoia of the fifties; the sporting-event competition of the sixties space race and the disillusionment of the seventies. The book could have ended there; Buddy, a young adult, still loving science, but feeling cynical and betrayed. This isn't Fies's style. He makes a quantum leap at the ending of the book, pointing out that tiny, everyday choices build the world of tomorrow, in ways the pioneers and visionaries of the fifties and sixties would never have imagined. The world of tomorrow didn't abandon or betray us. It just doesn't look exactly like we expected it to.
    Fies weaves together every narrative element of a graphic novel in service to his parable. His color palette is deliberately chosen to create a sense of each decade. The depiction of Buddy and Pop is deceptively simple and you might not realize on first read just how fine an artist he is. Once you've read it, go back through and linger on the images and the composition.
    Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow is thoughtful, touching, sad, hopeful, funny, deeply personal and, like all good art, universal. It could be translated into any language and still resonate with those audiences, because at its heart it's about a father and son. If you are looking for a book to share with your dad, a book to share with your kids, a book for the porch swing or even something to put next to your copy of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, this is the one for you.

  • I really enjoy the idea behind Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?, the latest original graphic novel by Brian Fies, author of Mom's Cancer. The work analyzes and unpacks 1940s and '50s futurism, which is one of my favorite aspects of kitsch and pop culture. It's that kind of "gee whiz," "Buck Rogers" sensibility that informs some of our best modern pop artifacts.

    Fies obviously shares this sense of wonder. The book is packed with loving descriptions and illustrations, starting with the 1939 New York World's Fair, the book's opening setting. The work's subsequent examination of what people only a generation or so ago imagined our generation's lives to be like is a really enlightening exercise; the innocence with which they hoped for their unrealized future really instills a sense of modern wonder and nostalgia--even if a reader wasn't around to enjoy "the world of tomorrow" the first time around. This feeling shines through on every page, starting with the aforementioned World's Fair, and continuing into the portions dealing with man's first forays into space exploration and rocket science.

    In terms of giving a quirky and interesting cultural history lesson, Fies's book succeeds. However, it's the framing device with which he delivers this lesson that seems to come up a bit short. The book's two main characters--only main characters, really--are Pop and Buddy, a father and son who we watch grow and mature through the 20th century, culminating in the mid-1970s. Along the way, we get interludes of Cap Crater and the Cosmic Kid, stand-ins for Pop and Buddy, whose adventures are crafted to pay homage to the various comic book heroes and styles of their respective decades. These were my favorite portions of the book, as the paper-stock changes to replicate old comic book pages, as does the coloring (along with "accidentally-on-purpose" coloring errors).

    The Cap Crater segments offer a tongue-in-cheek commentary on the changing times and attitudes experienced by Pop and Buddy. The Pop and Buddy sections--the majority of the book, in essence--are themselves allegorical, their relationship standing in for the strained relations that the younger generations began to have with their forebears. But this doesn't work as well as it could; they, like any good comic book character, age through time very, very slowly, so that Buddy is only just going off to college 36 years after the book begins. This makes whatever minimal plot there is between father and son matter far less than they should, effectively dividing a reader's attention between the history lessons Buddy's narrative offers, the plot of Buddy and his father, and the comic book exploits of Cap and the Kid.

    Fies's book's heart is in the right place, and it's an excellent way to gain knowledge and perspective on an aspect of American history that remains important, despite its being in the past. But it's unfortunate that the strong characterization and story that defined Mom's Cancer didn't resonate through Fies's work once again here.

    -- Brian P. Rubin

  • Graphic storytelling can take its time bringing readers into new worlds and thinking. Mixing an honest portrayal of how a young person would experience major moments in our recent history with an optimistic view of our world leaves a quiet hope yet sadness at where we’ve been this last century. I appreciated reading the truth behind decisions and directions our country has undertaken, and seeing the future in light of our basic simplicity. Anyone who enjoys reading to escape, or who wonders where we might go next or who wants to feel an emotional melancholy about it all should buy this book and keep it face forward on the shelf as a reminder. I’m glad I did.

  • A great read, and a superb history lesson for those of us who are visual learners, and missed out on a lot we were supposed to learn from textbooks in school. The illustrations are expertly done! I sent (signed!) copies to three of my relatives.