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ePub The Playful World: How Technology Is Transforming Our Imagination download

by Mark Pesce

ePub The Playful World: How Technology Is Transforming Our Imagination download
Author:
Mark Pesce
ISBN13:
978-0345439437
ISBN:
0345439430
Language:
Publisher:
Ballantine Books; 1 edition (October 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Computer Science
ePub file:
1755 kb
Fb2 file:
1482 kb
Other formats:
lit azw mobi lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
191

Yet Mark Pesce, the author of The Playful World, How Technology is Transforming . In this case, Pesce predicts that within about 72 hours, all the atoms on Earth could be transformed into self-duplicating nanomachines.

Yet Mark Pesce, the author of The Playful World, How Technology is Transforming Our Imagination, isn't tucking his head between his knees and murmuring his final prayers. He's too busy discovering how new media and technologies are combining to create experiences humans have never previously enjoyed. Like the ultimate Hollywood triumph, a thick, grey nanogoo could slime the world during the course of a holiday weekend. Perhaps the world does end with a whimper after al.

Yet Mark Pesce, the author of The Playful World, How Technology is Transforming .

This was a very exciting book about how technology is transforming us, particularly the first two-thirds. I had a feeling that the author was padding a little bit in the last third. Or maybe my enthusiasm was winding down. Almost as exciting as reading Seymour Papert, I don’t think there is anything as exciting as reading Papert, the author claims, as does Papert, that education as we know it is obsolete. I am convinced of that.

But engineers of the playful world have already gone much further into considerably stranger virtual realms

But engineers of the playful world have already gone much further into considerably stranger virtual realms. We meet the creators of LEGO Mindstorms, a snap-together plastic device that intelligently controls motors and processes data from sensors. As you read these words, the architects of the new virtual reality are inventing a world you never imagined: call it the playful world. It's a world of interactive Web-based toys that instantly collapse the gulf between wish and existence, space and time, animate and inanimate.

Mark Pesce, The Playful World: How Technology Transforms our Imagination. Mark Pesce, Learning VRML: Design for Cyberspace. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Ziff-Davis Publishing, 1997. New York, Ballantine Books (Random House), October 2000. Mark Pesce, VRML: Flying through the Web. Indianapolis, Indiana: New Riders Publishing, 1996. Mark Pesce, VRML: Browsing and Building Cyberspace. Indianapolis, Indiana: New Riders Publishing, 1995. Introduction to Celia Pearce, The Interactive Book. Indianapolis, Indiana: Macmillan Technical Publishing, 1997.

The Playful World" is a fascinating tome by author Mark Pesce, one of the foremost practical techno wizards of our time.

Mark Pesce, The Playful World. How Technology Is Transforming Our Imagination (New York: Ballantine, 2000). 41. Lewis Mumford, The Myth of the Machine (New York: Harcourt, Brace, amp; World, 1966). com/ (23 March 2002). 42. Joseph Weizenbaum, Computer Power and Human Reason (San Francisco: W. H. Freeman, 1976). 25. Leslie Haddon, The Social Consequences of Mobile Telephony: Framing Questions, в отчете The Social Consequences of Mobile Telephony: The Proceedings from a Seminar About Society, Mobile Telephony, and Children, Telenor R amp;D N 38/2000, ed. Rich Ling and Kristin Trane, 26 June 2000, 2-6, (31 January 2002).

As you read these words, the architects of the new virtual reality are inventing a world you never imagined: call it the playful world. It's a world of interactive Web-based toys that instantly collapse the gulf between wish and existence, space and time, animate and inanimate. It's a world where the entire fabric of the material world becomes manipulable, programmable, mutable. Situated at the crossroads of high technology and popular culture, the playful world is taking shape at the speed of electronic creativity.Are you ready for it? Your kids are.In this spellbinding new book, Mark Pesce, one of the pioneers in the ongoing technological revolution, explores how a new kind of knowing and a new way of creating are transforming the culture of our time. It started, bizarrely enough, with Furbys, the first toys that had the "will" to grow and interact intelligently with their environment. As Pesce argues, Furbys, for all their cloying cuteness, were a vital sign of a new human endeavor--the ability to copy part of our own intelligence into the physical world.But engineers of the playful world have already gone much further into considerably stranger virtual realms. Pesce takes us inside the world's cutting-edge research facilities where the distinction between bits and atoms is rapidly dissolving. We meet the creators of LEGO Mindstorms, a snap-together plastic device that intelligently controls motors and processes data from sensors. We watch technological geniuses like Marvin Minsky and Eric Drexler turn the theoretical breakthroughs of Nobel laureate Richard Feynman into "nanites"-- tiny ultra-high-speed computers that replicate intelligent life. We observe the launch of the amazing and much-anticipated Sony Playstation 2, a platform that will allow us to bring synthetic worlds into the home and create a gateway to the living planet.Web-based toys are only the beginning--the first glimmer of a new reality that is transforming our entire culture with incredible speed and power. After all,  thanks to the computer revolution and the Internet, all of us already command powers that just a generation ago would have been described as magical. Magic is about to take on a whole new dimension. In this dazzling book, Mark Pesce offers a mind-bending preview of the incredible future that awaits us all in The Playful World.
  • The book is an attempt to make sense of many facts in regards to the possibilities of tech. The result is a long magazine article which gets exhausting because each page has the most and best, etc... There are other books that have the same information but are better written.

  • I was hoping for some insight from this book that I could use in our Internet company. Possibly it was my error in purchasing it. The author shares his thoughts and gives history, but it did not provoke any thoughts for me nor provide much value. If you are into the toy industry or the discussion of theory, it might be a good buy. If you have looking for ideas or inspiration, I'd recommend you try elsewhere.

  • Investors who felt a few jolts in their technology portfolios this year are advised to buckle their seat belts. Those reverberations were merely the thrum of our new engines kicking into gear. As the plane of mass technology lifts into the air, the ride promises to be wild, volatile and sometimes downright scary.

    Yet Mark Pesce, the author of The Playful World, How Technology is Transforming Our Imagination, isn't tucking his head between his knees and murmuring his final prayers. He's too busy discovering how new media and technologies are combining to create experiences humans have never previously enjoyed.

    Pesce doesn't provide the vision of a technology guru like Marshall McLuhan and his book doesn't supply the analytical tools of McLuhan's Understanding Media. He's more like an international correspondent, charging into the frontlines beside the many geniuses who are transforming the technological landscape of the planet.

    He begins with a study of Furby, that pesky darling of thousands of privileged children. Despite its whining, Furby is the first toy to demonstrate adaptive behaviour and an ability to communicate with other Furbys via infrared transceivers. Pesce states that "Furby is an emotional creature, with basic needs and desires." More likely, children who play with Furby transfer their own emotions to the furry little guy. It's a distinction that weakens Pesce's credibility. Too bad, because most of what follows is fascinating stuff.

    For example, he provides an analysis of nanotechnology, the atomic-scale assembly of devices. As a student at MIT in the early 1980s, he met Eric Drexler, a pioneer of miniaturization's final frontier. Drexler is devising ways to construct new molecules atom by atom, snapping them together much like Lego blocks. His key tools are nanoassembers and nanocomputers. These novelties open whole new fields of technology like nanomedicine, in which physicians can contrive digestible computers that perform molecular surgeries before they are excreted.

    Pesce's personal expertise is in virtual reality (VR) devices. He invented VRML (virtual reality modeling language) which he introduced at the First International Conference on the World Wide Web in Geneva. VRML brings VR modeling into the realm of the internet. With the proper internet plug-ins, anyone can log onto a VR web site and play VR games or conduct VR science experiments.

    When internet VR is combined with haptic (tactile) feedback, look-and-feel technologies become truly visceral. Haptic interfaces like the Argonne Remote Manipulator will become as common as computer mice, Pesce says. Soon you may be able to log on to a virtual reality web site and feel the icy waters of the Arctic Ocean or the smooth face of Ayers Rock in the Australian outback. Better yet, log on to a site dedicated to nanotechnologies where you might feel the surface of atoms in a new medication tailored to relieve your Aunt Martha's arthritis.

    Everything that rises must converge and Pesce suggests that the confluence of these inventions is likely to occur in Sony's new Playstation III, due for release in 2005. If it's linked to the internet, connected to a haptic interface and viewed through high-definition television, Playstation III's VR capabilities will challenge novice users to distinguish virtual reality from the real McCoy.

    Thus equipped for the new age, people can conduct endless modeling scenarios for any variety of research. They can log on from their homes and order robots to execute commands on another continent. On the other hand, a real-life Dr. No may decide to program a set of nanocomputers to replicate themselves endlessly. In this case, Pesce predicts that within about 72 hours, all the atoms on Earth could be transformed into self-duplicating nanomachines. Like the ultimate Hollywood triumph, a thick, grey nanogoo could slime the world during the course of a holiday weekend. (Perhaps the world does end with a whimper after all.)

    The difference between speculation and science can be difficult to gauge. Sometimes Pesce's book does little to distinguish one from the other. But he is certainly correct in declaring that mass media and technologies will continue to transform our imagination. They inhabit us as much as we inhabit them; maybe that's the fundamental meaning of virtual reality.

    D.F. (Don) Bailey [...]
    The Playful World: How Technology Is Transforming Our Imagination

  • Good account of today's interactive toys, where they come from, and where they're going in the near term. It's always dangerous to predict how technology will modify our ontological horizons and Pesce, to his credit, doesn't push to hard on predictions, or engage in too much utopian dreaming. He resolutely focuses on explaining in layman's terms how advances in Artificial Intelligence are finding their way into toys. He also looks at nanotechnology and considers its implications. A self-admitted techie, he ventures into the predictive mode only where he has some empirical evidence to support his case. For instance he cites a study conducted by Sherry Turkle at MIT among kids who owned "interactive" pets like Furby which found that these kids did not classify these pets as either or alive or not alive but rather as some third category of object.
    There will be implications for our children deriving from this new category of object, Pesce states, but doesn't take it much further than that. For instance, one might ask will this new category of object somehow work to erase the line between machine and humanity, to blur the boundary between our bodies and technology, a boundary already blurred by the objectification of the body in consumer culture? Will the difficulties encountered in making and refining this third class of artificially intelligent object help us to form a more complete understanding of the capabilities and capacities of humanity? Is that something we want to do? Why? Why are the dystopian implications of such technology always more compelling of our attention than the utopian implications?
    These are questions that are really not within the stated scope of the book. But, of course, these are the most interesting questions.

  • "The Playful World" is a fascinating tome by author Mark Pesce, one of the foremost practical techno wizards of our time. The creator of VRML (virtual reality mark-up language) Pesce's visions are creating a new immersive society and info-mediaries for today and tomorrow. Pesce helps you learn how to pretend again-- how to make believe and use those skills to build new bridges to the future whether you're involved in tech or whether you just want to understand the next generation of anything -- people, places and things. Pesce tackles tough topics and adds an amusing presentation to help you understand such concepts as distributed intelligence, engineered structures and yes, toys.
    Pesce maintains it started with the FURBY -- you remember those little gremlin like creatures form Tiger Electronics a few holiday seasons ago don't you? He says they are the beginning of being able to embody human intelligence into the machine world (at least the beginning of what we can see on our store shelves). IA -- intelligence augmented is probably more likely than AI artificial intelligence but as our devices get smarter and our phones know where are kids and colleagues are, it's comforting to think that you can learn to USE technology not have it replace YOU!. Pesce is optimistic that the new 'synthetic worlds will create a gateway to a living planet'. It's all just a few years ahead-- this book will serve as a bridge of knowledge to tomorrow and make you think about ordinary objects in extraordinary ways.