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ePub Learning Exchange Server 2003 download

by William Boswell

ePub Learning Exchange Server 2003 download
Author:
William Boswell
ISBN13:
978-0321228741
ISBN:
032122874X
Language:
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (September 30, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Hardware & DIY
ePub file:
1844 kb
Fb2 file:
1492 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw mbr lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
636

Bill Boswell writes for working administrators whose responsibilities now include Exchange Server 2003. He addresses every facet of Exchange from architecture to address lists, answering three key questions: How does it work? How do I get the most out of it? How do I fix it if it breaks?

Bill Boswell writes for working administrators whose responsibilities now include Exchange Server 2003. He addresses every facet of Exchange from architecture to address lists, answering three key questions: How does it work? How do I get the most out of it? How do I fix it if it breaks? Unlike some books, this one recognizes that you're deploying Exchange in the context of a complex IT infrastructure. Boswell thoroughly discusses Exchange's key dependencies and connections, and offers detailed process analyses-complete with diagrams and step-by-step integration guidance.

A guide to Exchange Server 2003 for working administrators, this work addresses various facets of Exchange from . Bill Boswell writes for working administrators whose responsibilities now include Exchange Server 2003

A guide to Exchange Server 2003 for working administrators, this work addresses various facets of Exchange from architecture to address lists. Bill Boswell writes for working administrators whose responsibilities now include Exchange Server 2003. He addresses every facet of Exchange from architecture to address lists, answering three key questions: How does it work? How do I get the most out of it? How do I fix it if it breaks? Unlike some books, this one recognizes that you’re deploying Exchange in the context of a complex IT infrastructure.

Learning Exchange Server 2003. Learning Exchange Server 2003. by. Boswell, William. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Learning Exchange Server 2003 book. Details (if other): Cancel.

A guide to Exchange Server 2003 for working administrators, this work addresses various facets of Exchange from architecture to address lists, answering three key questions: How does it work? How do I get the most out of it? How do I fix it if it breaks? It discusses Exchange's key dependencies and connections, and offers process analyses.

Surprisingly, the majority of organizations running Exchange are still usingExchange . that was released in 1997. In 2003, Microsoft suspended theirsupport of . Companies are now starting to upgrade and they will upgradeto 2003. Most sys admins who call themselves "Exchange" admins have never reallyworked with Exchange servers before. And for them, most of the books onthe market assume they have a basic understanding of Exchange and thereforejump right into a feature-based approach for Exchange 2003. Are you sure you want to remove Learning Exchange Server 2003 from your list? Learning Exchange Server 2003. Published 2004 by Addison-Wesley in Boston. Microsoft Windows server system series.

This book made my head hurt. You are better off reading "Learning Exchange Server", by William Boswell. The ponderous writing style of the author, and his contstant references to Exchange . (who cares about Exchange . any longer??), Windows NT, and Windows 2000, made it difficult to actually learn the Exchange 2003 product. This book is about 300 pages of content about Exchange 2003 compressed into 896 pages of backward looking fluff. Categories: Computers\Programming. Издание: 1. Язык: english.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 1. 9 Mb. Inside Windows Server 2003. Category: Computer science.

Inside Windows Server 2003. William Boswell, MCSE, is the principal engineer for the Windows Consulting Group based in Phoenix, Arizona. For frustrated administrators unafraid of registry. In addition to training and consulting, he writes the popular "Windows Insider" column for MCP Magazine and is a sought-after speaker for conferences such as TechMentor and SANS.

A guide to Exchange Server 2003 for working administrators, this work addresses various facets of Exchange from architecture to address lists, answering three key questions: How does it work? How do I get the most out of it? How do I fix it if it breaks? It discusses Exchange's key dependencies and connections, and offers process analyses.
  • Well written in simple English without a bunch of jargon. I don't think I saw a single instance of the words, "rich" or "robust". Very good book for someone with minimal experience wanting to install Exchange Server for the first time and also an excellent reference guide for those with more experience interested in advanced configurations.

  • I'd thought that I was free to co-author with Bill to write this book, but ... Anyway, Bill is very good as far as W2k and W2k3 o/s are concerned, but he is also very good with Exchange 2k3. More importantly, Bill is very good to bring those complex issues down to earth with plained-English, explained the whole thing with a great sense of humor. Now, looking back, I think it was a good decision for not to get involved in writing this book with Bill in the first place because there is no way I could match his skill.

    Very well-done, Bill. I hope I would see the Advanced-Topics on the Exchange 2k3 as well, also written by you, not just installing, performing basic configurations. Bill, I just want to let you know that I have started the time-watch now :)

  • Company moved me onto a special project and I wasn't able to make use of this. We were already on Exchange 2008 by the time I was back into this.

  • Books teaching you a Server product always seem to fall into one of two categories; the Cram for the MCSE test (in which you get the information needed to pass the test and not really administer the product), or the Mastering style (in which you are stuck with an 800 page book that assumes you already have an environment and are only interested in over-covering the advanced or obscure features). I was pleasantly surprised to find that this title actually provides hand-held walk-thrus for the uninitiated, and continues the education process to cover basics, intermediate and advanced skills.

    The author starts the title by ensuring that everyone has the same lab environment by way of an environmental setup walk-thru. This includes not only the Exchange portion itself, but hints and tips on how to minimize the hardware needed and build your environment with mostly trialware so as to keep the costs down for those who are reading the title outside of a corporate environment. From there, time is taken to introduce legacy and modern email protocols and formats in the context of the email client. Once covered you are taken deep inside the Exchange 2003 environment, starting with the service architecture and moving you thru server management, recipient / distribution list management and publishing, private mailbox and public folder health and control, message routing and finally Outlook Web Access. All of these topics are presented without undo references to how it was done in 5.5, which is a pleasant change from so many other titles that attempt the same level of Exchange education. Once you have become comfortable with the Exchange system itself, time is spent teaching you how Exchange is integrated with the parental network. This includes distributed architecture planning, Exchange 5.5 migration (which is separated out as a single chapter and easily skipped if you do not need it), and finally partner services, such as anti-virus and spam control mechanisms.

    What really sets this title apart, is that time is taken to ensure that the Exchange specific terminology is defined clearly and that you understand what the components are before you find yourself 70 pages in and realizing that what you just read doesn't mean what you thought it did (or if you're like me, you've reached a point where you can no longer just skip over the word pretending that it isn't important). Although covering technical aspects, it is written neither so dryly nor so technical as to put the reader off; the author enjoys the topic and passes the enthusiasm along. If you are looking for a title to teach you to Exchange 2003 administration - pick this up.

  • Admit it, computer books can be very dry, and all to often, so technical that you have to purchase other resources to understand what the author is talking about. Well, that is not the case in "Learning Exchange Server 2003" by Mr. Boswell. He is able to explain concepts of Exchange in a conversational manner that makes going thru the exercises a breeze. You should be able to go thru all the exercises in one afternoon, and then plan on spending any follow-up time on topics you are unsure of. Mr.. Boswell does a great job of teaching concepts so you actually grasp them. Imagine that!! While some may complain that this book does not go in-depth enough on certain topics, I need to point out that this book is designed for the do-ers and not the philosophers.

  • Email is one of the core functionalities of a computer network. If those computers are running Microsoft operating systems, then Exchange Server 2003 often handles the mail. Due to the crucial nature of email, the book shows how Microsoft has built up a lot of capabilities into it. The book assumes that you are the sysadmin delegated to setting up and running it.

    So there are lengthy but necessary explanations about the message formats. In the header and body. You can see the difference between bodies written in plain text, HTML or Rich Text Format. Though the latter is mostly supported only by Microsoft, and has gained relatively little traction elsewhere. Despite what the book says about RTF, you can often safely ignore it. Just concentrate on understanding the other two.

    You will probably have to maintain distribution lists of your local users. The book gives elaborate GUIs built to simplify this work. Much fancier than editing files like /etc/aliases under unix.

    The book also teaches a lot about how SMTP is handled by ES2003. Plus, it gives a good discussion about current antispam and antivirus filters. The level of detail about the antispam filters is concise and understandable, and is a fair summary of the main methods currently deployed.