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ePub The Computer Boys Take Over: Computers, Programmers, and the Politics of Technical Expertise (History of Computing) download

by Nathan L. Ensmenger

ePub The Computer Boys Take Over: Computers, Programmers, and the Politics of Technical Expertise (History of Computing) download
Author:
Nathan L. Ensmenger
ISBN13:
978-0262050937
ISBN:
0262050935
Language:
Publisher:
The MIT Press (August 13, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Culture
ePub file:
1211 kb
Fb2 file:
1385 kb
Other formats:
mbr lit mobi doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
500

Nathan Ensmenger's sociological history of the stored-program digital computer prompts, again, the question . Ensmenger's history, published in 2010, is based on his PhD dissertation completed in 2001 at the University of Pennsylvania where he now teaches.

Nathan Ensmenger's sociological history of the stored-program digital computer prompts, again, the question "What is history?" I welcomed his book for it promised a look at the interaction between the computer and the scientific, business, government, and opinion-leading communities that have embraced the computer's existence. It covers events from about 1945 to 1980. Data from the three most recent decades, 1980 - 2010, almost do not enter Ensmenger's database!

This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-twentieth century and the people who made it possible. Ensmenger has provided scholars of organizations, technology, and business a tremendous service with this book.

This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-twentieth century and the people who made it possible. Unlike most histories of computing, it is not a book about machines, inventors, or entrepreneurs. He draws effectively from both the history and sociology of technology to argue that the understanding of the artifact of software is critical to comprehending the ways in which organizations changed after WWII as a result of the wide scale adoption of the electronic digital computer.

Ensmenger's descriptions of 'computer science' and 'software engineering,' as well as his portraits of Maurice Wilkes, Alan Turing, John Backus, Edsger Dijkstra, Fred Brooks, and other pioneers, give a compelling introduction to the field. Thomas J. Misa, director of the Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota, "This book provides the most holistic.

The contentious history of the computer programmers who developed the software that made the computer revolution possible. MIT Press, 24 ago. 2012 - 336 páginas. This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-twentieth century and the people who made it possible.

The title roughly translates into English as Computer Pioneers: The beginning of the computer age in the Netherlands But pay attention to Tatarchenko and her work. Her work on the history of Soviet computing is just stellar, and part of an exciting reinvigoration of that field.

The title roughly translates into English as Computer Pioneers: The beginning of the computer age in the Netherlands. I unfortunately do not read Dutch, but I know Gerard and his work and have talked about this history on many occasions. This is an important and original contribution to our field. But pay attention to Tatarchenko and her work.

By the late 1950s, however, programmers had begun to take on a privileged status as highly skilled masters of the arcane.

Alan Turing: Crash Course Computer Science - Продолжительность: 13:04 CrashCourse Recommended for you. 13:04. How To Insert Image Into Another Image Using Microsoft Word - Продолжительность: 14:13 Recipes Recommended for you.

This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-20th century and the people who made it possible.

The Computer Boys Take Over: Computers, Programmers, and the Politics of Technical Expertise is a book by Nathan L. Ensmenger

The Computer Boys Take Over: Computers, Programmers, and the Politics of Technical Expertise is a book by Nathan L. Ensmenger. Publication Date: August 13, 2010 ISBN-10: 0262050935 ISBN-13: 978-0262050937. Like all great social and technological developments, the "computer revolution" of the twentieth century didn't just happen. People-not impersonal processes-made it happen.

To many of their contemporaries, it seemed the "computer boys" were taking over, not just in the corporate setting, but also in government, politics, and society in general

Series: History of Computing. Published by: MIT Press. To many of their contemporaries, it seemed the "computer boys" were taking over, not just in the corporate setting, but also in government, politics, and society in general. In The Computer Boys Take Over, Nathan Ensmenger traces the rise to power of the computer expert in modern American society.

This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-20th century and the people who made it possible.  Unlike most histories of computing, it is not a book about machines, inventors, or entrepreneurs. Instead, it tells the story of the vast but largely anonymous legions of computer specialists—programmers, systems analysts, and other software developers—who transformed the electronic computer from a scientific curiosity into the defining technology of the modern era.  Known alternatively as "whiz kids," "hackers," and "gurus," this new breed of technical specialists were alternately admired for their technical prowess and despised for their eccentric mannerisms and the disruptive potential of the technologies they developed.  As the systems that they built became evermore powerful and ubiquitous, these specialists became the focus of a series of critiques of the social and organizational impact of electronic computing.  To many of their contemporaries, it seemed the "computer boys" were taking over, not just in the corporate setting, but also in government, politics, and society in general. In The Computer Boys Take Over, Nathan Ensmenger traces the rise to power of the computer expert in modern American society.  He follows the history of computer programming from its origins as low-status, largely feminized labor in the secret wartime computing projects through its reinvention as a glamorous "black art" practiced by "computer cowboys" in the 1950s through its rationalization in the 1960s as the academic discipline of computer science and the software engineering profession. His rich and nuanced portrayal of the men and women (a surprising number of the "computer boys" were, in fact, female) who built their careers around the novel technology of electronic computing explores issues of power, identity, and expertise that have only become more significant to our increasingly computerized society.  His detailed analysis of the pervasive "software crisis" rhetoric of the late 1960s shows how seemingly technical debates about how to manage large-scale software development projects reflected deeper concerns about the growing power and influence of technical specialists in corporate, academic, and governmental organizations.  In his recasting of the drama of the computer revolution through the eyes of its principle revolutionaries, Ensmenger reminds us that the computerization of modern society was not an inevitable process driven by impersonal technological or economic imperatives, but was rather a creative, contentious, and above all, fundamentally human development.
  • A fascinating book that covers a critical part of the history of the computing industry, when computing shifted from being a science and engineering marvel, to a business necessity. That transition created an enormous need for computer programmers, and lead to the creation of programming languages (e.g., Fortran, COBOL, ADA) and the development of "software engineering" in response to the "software crisis." The author argues that the responses to that transition leads us to the characteristics of the modern computing industry. For example, he argues that the (failed) attempts to professionalize computer programming is what led to the retreat of women from the field. As a computing educator and education researcher, the book gave me new insights into the role that education plays in software engineering, the "software crisis," and the future of our field. Highly recommended.

  • Best yet from an IT professional who was there through the entire period!!
    Jon H.

  • An excellent read for anyone looking to understand why the field of computing used to be feminized and now is male dominated. Ensmenger busts the myth of meritocracy and women's technical incompetence with historical evidence, and the book is full of fascinating ads and images from the period. Oh, and have you ever seen that old 1960s Cosmo article about "computer programming is a great job for girls" floating around the internet? Yeah well Professor Ensmenger found it, tracked down an old copy, scanned it, and then released it into the wild for us all to enjoy--worth thinking about how he's never given credit for that the next time you see it making the rounds. Historians put in the effort to find and publicize these things: if we want to support that we should buy their books.

  • These readings were few of the many books which kept me intersted from cover to cover. It was a great pick up, even for a novice reader at university.

  • Review of Ensmenger's "The computer boys take over" by Paul F. Ross

    Nathan Ensmenger's sociological history of the stored-program digital computer prompts, again, the question "What is history?" I welcomed his book for it promised a look at the interaction between the computer and the scientific, business, government, and opinion-leading communities that have embraced the computer's existence. This history would look for the computer's influence on the course of events, on the way we think about ourselves and guide our affairs. Instead, Ensmenger examines the emerging computer-society interaction from the point of view of the computer careerist, also viewing the challenge to ____________________________________________________________________________________

    Ensmenger, Nathan "The computer boys take over: Computers, programmers, and the politics of technical expertise" 2010, The MIT Press, Cambridge MA, x + 320 pages
    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    sponsors and managers of computer-based projects, the search for the proper skills and education needed for preparation as a computer careerist, and the careerists' efforts to forge widely recognized social and professional identity. Ensmenger limits this history to recording events as seen by computing careerists at the time history was being experienced, thus overlooking the historian's and behavioral scientist's opportunity, the outsider's opportunity, to understand events based on retrospective and perspective-enlarged analysis. This review disects Ensmenger's history and seeks to offer a larger framework for further historical analysis.

    Ensmenger's history, published in 2010, is based on his PhD dissertation completed in 2001 at the University of Pennsylvania where he now teaches. It covers events from about 1945 to 1980. Data from the three most recent decades, 1980 - 2010, almost do not enter Ensmenger's database! This reader understands that a PhD candidate needs to tailor dissertation research to the time and resources available, understands that Ensmenger has added to his dissertation while creating this book, is pleased to have in hand what has been accomplished, but also sees important work yet to be done.

    Bellevue, Washington
    19 November 2010, 23 December 2010

    Copyright (c) 2010 by Paul F. Ross All rights reserved.

  • On time!