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ePub The Tao of Objects: A Beginner's Guide to Object-Oriented Programming download

by Bruce Eckel,Gary Entsminger

ePub The Tao of Objects: A Beginner's Guide to Object-Oriented Programming download
Author:
Bruce Eckel,Gary Entsminger
ISBN13:
978-1558514126
ISBN:
1558514120
Language:
Publisher:
M&T Books, MIS: Press, Henry Holt and Company; 2nd edition (February 1, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Programming
ePub file:
1486 kb
Fb2 file:
1310 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr mobi txt
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
822

Entsminger, Gary, 1950-. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Entsminger, Gary, 1950-. Object-oriented programming (Computer science), Object-georiënteerd programmeren, C++, Turbo Pascal, Objektorientierte Programmierung. Redwood City, CA : M&T Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by MerciG on July 22, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Object-oriented programming is revolutionizing the world of software development. This revised and updated roadmap is designed to guide the many who are attracted to the power and versatility of OOP.

The Tao of Objects book. The Tao of Objects: A Beginner's Guide to Object-Oriented Programming. Tao of Objects: A Beginner's Guide to Object-Oriented Programming. More). Secrets of the Visual Basic for Windows masters. Why This Book Is For You. About This Book. Developing Paradox databases - an object-oriented approach: an in-depth guide to developing dynamic databases with Paradox for Windows.

You wrote "The Tao of Objects: A Beginner's Guide to Object-Oriented Programming" with Gary Entsminger. Will that book ever be updated (it has examples in Delphi, and Delphi has grown up a lot since that book came out)

You wrote "The Tao of Objects: A Beginner's Guide to Object-Oriented Programming" with Gary Entsminger. Will that book ever be updated (it has examples in Delphi, and Delphi has grown up a lot since that book came out). Not that book per se - it's really Gary's project and he has been working on other things lately. However, I am working on a new book that I think will do something similar. I've put it off for years, but I can finally see a way to do it right.

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm based on the concept of "objects", which can contain data, in the form of fields (often known as attributes or properties), and code, in the form of procedures (often known as meth.

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm based on the concept of "objects", which can contain data, in the form of fields (often known as attributes or properties), and code, in the form of procedures (often known as methods).

A beginner's guide to Gambas - John W. Rittinghouse (PDF). The Ultimate Guide To Elixir For Object-Oriented Programmers - Bruce Park (HTML). Ecto Getting Started Guide (HTML). Pick/Basic: A Programmer's Guide - Jonathan E. Sisk. Visual Basic Essentials. Object Oriented Programming using C - Simon Kendal, Bookboon. Threading in C Xamarin Cross-Platform Development Cookbook - George Taskos, Packt.

The OOP or Object Oriented Programming is one of the most popular . These books are a great resource to learn how to think in terms of objects and how to identify relationships among objects in a complex.

The OOP or Object Oriented Programming is one of the most popular programming paradigms which helps you to organize code in the real-world system. It's a tool that allows you to write sophisticated software by thinking in terms of objects and relationships. This is my most recommended book to a beginner programmer who wants to learn OOP and how to apply that in real-world applications. These books are a great resource to learn how to think in terms of objects and how to identify relationships among objects in a complex, real-world scenario. Though you have to do a lot more than just reading books.

Eckel’s book is the only one to so clearly explain how to rethink program construction for .

Eckel’s book is the only one to so clearly explain how to rethink program construction for object orientation. That the book is also an excellent tutorial on the ins and outs of C++ is an added bonus. 1: Introduction to Objects. The progress of abstraction An object has an interface The hidden implementation Reusing the implementation Inheritance: reusing the interface. Is-a vs. is-like-a relationships Interchangeable objects with polymorphism Creating and destroying objects Exception handling: dealing with errors Analysis and design.

Introduces the concept of object-oriented programming, provides examples in C++, Delphi, Visual Basic, and dBASE for Windows, and looks at current applications
  • Basically, one can easily break this book down into two main parts: a discussion of object-orientedness and an introductory how-to on OO programming techniques. Within the first area, this book is pretty good. All the basics of OO are covered: objects, methods, encapsulation, polymorphism, late-binding, etc. However, there are some/several assertions one could argue with - mostly boiling down to what REALLY constitutes an OO language. Perhaps part of the problem here is that the book focuses on what Entsminger calls hybrid languages - that is, non-pure OO - specifically C++ and Turbo Pascal. This question ties into the second main thrust of the text, however. Before moving into the other area, I would like to mention my main criticism of the author's discussion of OO, and that is that the attempt to relate the concept(s) to Taoism fail - indeed are perhaps distracting.

    Aside from discussing OO, the author attempts to demonstrate a methodology for implementing it. There are several problems, and perhaps no real benefits, here. First, the book is 15 years old and a lot has changed. No real fault of the author there, and something that a new edition would resolve. Second, the choice of languages are perhaps poor for a variety of reasons. Today, most readers would likely consider C# and Java to be the best examples to use in the text. Again, this is tied to the age of the book. Yet there is another issue in the choice of languages, and here we see the author contradict himself: the languages are not pure-OO, and how they are implemented is even further from pure-OO. The author encourages using these languages as hybrids, even using them as base C and Pascal. This is an argument that rages on, but many contend that if you are going to use C++, for example, use it in OO fashion. This is where the contradiction emerges since Entsminger recommnends, when learning a language, to choose a new problem instead of one you have already solved in non-OO fashion. So how does one learn these new ways of thinking using a (relatively) familiar language, if that familiarity will tend to lead one down familiar paths?

    Further, I found the examples to be less than helpful. If I was wanting to learn "how to write (half) procedural programs in an OO environment," then perhaps my ears would perk up a bit. As it stands, the snippets are generally too terse to be useful, and the longer examples are too long (and without real explanation) and poorly constructed to lend any real value. Moreover, they aren't very portable (the C++ examples use conio.h - argh!).

    If you are looking for a basic introduction to OO, then this book may be worth perusing - at least the first few chapters. In terms of suggestions, I would say that if the code samples were dropped, the emphasis on hybridity eliminated, and the Taoist metaphor explored further in a book of about 120 pages, then this could be a worthwhile reading. As it stands, there are much better reads.

  • A friend loaned me this book when I was first starting to learn C++ many years ago.
    The first section where the author describes the OO approach is excellent - you could
    almost hear the light bulb go on in my head as I read it. Before, OO was just a list
    of arbitrary and confusing rules to me. Afterwards, I "got" OO and was able to begin
    designing software from an OO perspective.

    After that first section the author gets more specific, and I began to lose interest.
    I would still recommend the book just for that opening section, but advise a reader to
    quit reading after that.

  • I keep this one in my library as an example of how bad programming books can be. I felt like I got taken halfway through it. When I read it, I was learning object oriented programming with Delphi and C++. Although "examples" were given in both languages, many of them were so full of errors that they would not compile. Amazon's rating system requires that I award at least one star, but this book deserves none. NOT RECOMMENDED.

  • This is a terrible introduction to Object-Oriented programming. As mentioned, many of the examples won't even compile. But worse is that the examples show bad design decisions, confuse inheritance and composition, and aren't developed enough.
    The author spends so much time on polymorphism (deservedly) but so little on how to use it well. If you used this book to improve your C structures and modules, then you also miss the point of OO (and polymorphism).