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ePub Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (Software Studies) download

by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun

ePub Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (Software Studies) download
Author:
Wendy Hui Kyong Chun
ISBN13:
978-0262015424
ISBN:
0262015420
Language:
Publisher:
The MIT Press (April 29, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Programming
ePub file:
1474 kb
Fb2 file:
1224 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr lrf azw
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
953

Similar books to Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (Software Studies). In a move of stunning originality, Wendy Chun argues that belief in 'programmability' fuels the current organization of the modern liberal state.

Similar books to Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (Software Studies). Try Kindle Countdown Deals Explore limited-time discounted eBooks. Computer code, she tells us, is fetish―a magical entity thanks to which individuals believe themselves agents of causality and sovereignty. In truth, though, power lies elsewhere―most importantly in the social, political, and economic relations embedded within and materialized in the software and hardware that render us desiring subjects.

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, who has studied both systems design and English literature .

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, who has studied both systems design and English literature, is Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University. She is the author of Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics and Programmed Visions: Software and Memory, both published by the MIT Press. Series: Software Studies.

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun. Her second book, Programmed Visions: Software and Memory (2011), Chun argues that cycles of obsolescence and renewal (. mobile mobs, Web ., cloud computing) are byproducts of new media's logic of "programmability. It asks how computers have become organizing metaphors for understanding our neoliberal, networked moment (Updating to Remain the Same, 19).

In Programmed Visions, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that these cycles result in part from the ways in which new media encapsulates a logic of programmability. New media proliferates programmed visions, which seek to shape and predict-even embody-a future based on past data. These programmed visions have also made computers, based on metaphor, metaphors for metaphor itself, for a general logic of substitutability. Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art, social science, and design. New media proliferates "programmed visions," which seek to shape and predict-even embody-a future based on past data.

In " Programmed Visions," Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that these cycles result in part from the ways in which new media encapsulates a logic of programmability. New media proliferates "programmed visions," which seek to shape and predict - even embody - a future based on past data. These programmed visions have also made computers, based on metaphor, metaphors for metaphor itself, for a general logic of substitutability

In Programmed Visions, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that these cycles result in part from the ways in which new media encapsulates a logic of programmability.

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Programmed Visions: Software and Memory, The MIT Press, 2011, 239 pp. Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies, MIT Press, 2012, 504 pp. Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies, MIT Press, 2012, 504 p. .Geoff Cox, Alex McLean, Speaking Code: Coding as Aesthetic and Political Expression, MIT Press, 2012, 168 p.Nick Montfort, et a. 10 PRINT CHR$(20. +RND(1)); : GOTO 10, MIT Press, 2012, 304 p.

New media thrives on cycles of obsolescence and renewal: from celebrations of cyber-everything to Y2K, from the dot-com bust to the next big things -- mobile mobs, Web 3.0, cloud computing. In Programmed Visions, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that these cycles result in part from the ways in which new media encapsulates a logic of programmability. New media proliferates "programmed visions," which seek to shape and predict -- even embody -- a future based on past data. These programmed visions have also made computers, based on metaphor, metaphors for metaphor itself, for a general logic of substitutability.

Chun argues that the clarity offered by software as metaphor should make us pause, because software also engenders a profound sense of ignorance: who knows what lurks behind our smiling interfaces, behind the objects we click and manipulate? The combination of what can be seen and not seen, known (knowable) and not known -- its separation of interface from algorithm and software from hardware -- makes it a powerful metaphor for everything we believe is invisible yet generates visible, logical effects, from genetics to the invisible hand of the market, from ideology to culture.