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ePub From Program to Product: Turning Your Code into a Saleable Product (Expert's Voice) download

by Rocky Smolin

ePub From Program to Product: Turning Your Code into a Saleable Product (Expert's Voice) download
Author:
Rocky Smolin
ISBN13:
978-1590599716
ISBN:
1590599713
Language:
Publisher:
Apress; 1st ed. edition (March 28, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Programming
ePub file:
1130 kb
Fb2 file:
1884 kb
Other formats:
lrf docx txt mbr
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
531

Rocky Smolin began programming computers at the age of 16 at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.

Rocky Smolin began programming computers at the age of 16 at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. He created and marketed his first commercial product in 1969 while an undergraduate at Bradley University, and received a master's in business administration from San Diego State University in 1974.

Would–be software entrepreneurs must consult From Program to Product: Turning Your Code .

Would–be software entrepreneurs must consult From Program to Product: Turning Your Code into a Saleable Product, written by software developer and entrepreneur Rocky Smolin, for an indispensable roadmap to creating a commercially successful software product. Rocky Smolin walks you through the essentials of turning a development project into a product, including

Download PDF book format. General Note: Includes index.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. From program to product : turning your code into a saleable product Rocky Smolin. Book's title: From program to product : turning your code into a saleable product Rocky Smolin. Rubrics: Computer software Marketing Selling Computer programs Microcomputers Programming Development Businesspeople Interviews. Download now From program to product : turning your code into a saleable product Rocky Smolin. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

This book is not a general software business reference, like our MicroISV book or the Eric Sink book. It's specifically for readers who have an existing project, or an idea for one, and want to turn it into a product. They can follow this book for the best chance of success. It is written in a non-technical, friendly, conversational style, and is filled with excerpts, advice, and war stories from someone who's been in the trenches for years.

Many would–be software entrepreneurs with expertise in many fields attempt to turn a homegrown application-one developed for use in their own business or profession-into a commercial product. Lack of knowledge, experience, or skills often prevents the idea from ever taking shape, let alone achieving its potential. It’s specifically for readers who have an existing project, or an idea for one, and want to turn it into a product. It is written in a non-technical, friendly, conversational style, and is filled with excerpts, advice, and war stories from someone who’s been in the trenches for years. Users who liked this book, also liked.

You will learn about From Program to Product: Turning Your Code into a Saleable Product by Rocky Smolin.

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This book is not a general software business reference, like our MicroISV book or the Eric Sink book. It’s specifically for readers who have an existing project, or an idea for one, and want to turn it into a product. They can follow this book for the best chance of success. It is written in a non-technical, friendly, conversational style, and is filled with excerpts, advice, and war stories from someone who’s been in the trenches for years.

  • This is a great book that I highly recommend for anyone considering creating and selling their own software. While you do not need to be programmer to read this book, it is assumed that you will be working with one--and programmers will get the most out of this book.

    Rocky Smolin covers a lot of important, but easy to overlook, topics throughout the entire development process. Some of these topics are avoiding solving problems that don't exist, or not maintaining focus on what your program does, and does best. These are issues that need careful consideration at the beginning of the project and should not be taken lightly.

    He also includes interviews with developers who have already gone through a lot of the growing pains associated with developing software for sale. These really bring to light issues that you may have never considered, but are valid nonetheless. For example, how the interviewee handles customer support and pricing models. Very useful stuff.

    Some things you should not expect:
    1) How to program - This book provides considerations for how your program should be designed, but not what and how to code it. That is not the purpose of the book.
    2) Expert legal advice - Mr. Smolin is not an attorney and only addresses some legal considerations for writing and selling your software. Need legal advice? Hire a lawyer.

    I like how Mr. Smolin doesn't try and give you a 900 page book filled with information you don't need. It's kept short, with good information, and to the point. I don't have time to read yet another super-thick book--I'm too busy programming!

    I originally checked this book out from my local library, but have since purchased it from Amazon for my own collection. I really enjoy book and it continues to be a reference as I develop software for distribution.

  • Mr. Smolin's book isn't for the Sergei Brins or the Linus Torvalds of the world. If you think that the author is going to reveal the most sure-fire software development environment that will have the greatest chance of acceptance in the marketplace, you'd better look elsewhere. Actually, there IS no elsewhere because there is no such source that can deliver on such a claim.

    Those that think that Mr. Smolin should have shown Java or C# examples in his book are entirely missing the point: this is a book that shows EVERY factor a developer should consider BEFORE releasing his much-beloved software to an unsuspecting public. The development environment particulars have no bearing on the business of selling software. Do you really believe that a jewelry shop looking for something to help keep track of all the parts needed for jewelry design really cares one way or another whether your program is written in C# or Cobol?

    If you're looking at this book for guarantees, you won't find any. Software writing is a business, and anyone that indulges in wishful thinking is lost right from the start. You may think some feature you've written is just the coolest thing you've ever seen, but it may be the one thing that annoys a potential buyer so much that he'll pass your cool program right by without a second thought.

    The 67 pages of interviews take up about a third of this book. I was charmed, informed, and bemused by them all at once. The interviews in this book read like direct transcripts from the tapes. There seems to be little editing; nothing, say, like "Ten Questions for Lotta Miles" in People Magazine. But the flow is very natural and Mr. Smolin makes an engaging interviewer. I think he felt it important to devote such a large portion of his book to the interviews because it serves up a huge dollop of authenticity.

    None of his interview subjects have household names. Sure, an interview with the founders of Google or with Bill Gates would certainly have increased the general public's interest in this book and helped the sales considerably. But what do you really expect from an interview with a top flight software developer that hasn't been seen before? The people that are likely to buy this book will appreciate interviews with people that made a go of it by selling small, targeted software products to limited markets. That's going to make a heck of a lot more sense to developers looking to target small markets with their software products!

    The "secret" to success in software development is the same as it is in every business: work hard, pay attention to what your customers say, get the details right, work hard, keep promoting your product, make sure to have enough capital at the start and keep your fiscal house in order, keep up with your taxes, work continuously on improvements to your product, work hard, watch your competitors like a hawk, don't let yourself become discouraged, keep on top of your billing, don't borrow too much money, and work hard.

    Mr. Smolin's book covers them all. If you don't have a head for business, this book isn't really going to give you one. Well, NO book is going to give you that, all the thousands of business-oriented book titles to the contrary.

    But what this book DOES give you is -- believe it or not -- a step-by-step guide to bringing your software to market. There isn't anything magical here. No, let me re-phrase that: there IS magic here, magic in the down-to-earth principles that Mr. Smolin writes about so clearly. Yes, you've heard them a hundred times, but have you drawn them to your bosom and made them a part of your everyday life?

    If you want to know what this book is really all about, take these words from the section in Chapter 1 called "What This Book is Really About", contemplate them, absorb them, and realize that there really is no other way:

    "This book is really about getting to your first day in business.

    "It is about taking that raw idea you have for a program and creating a saleable product. And setting up the support system you need to make your business hum.

    "If you're going to do this thing, you have to be ready for some tough days. But nothing worthwhile ever comes easy. Sometimes what it really takes is stupid, blind obstinacy -- the drive to keep going, stubbornly solving one problem at a time until you get the brass ring."

    The magic comes from what Judith Martin calls "the alchemy of the spirit": the realization that you can, indeed, make a go of it if you just keep at it with "stupid, blind obstinacy", keeping your eye on the road ahead. Why should success involve anything more than what other successful people have done to become successful?

    Here, in brief, are most of the steps that Mr. Smolin covers:

    1) Define your product
    2) Analyze it and create a system specification
    3) Build in security
    4) Design
    5) Make program navigation consistent and smooth
    6) Choose a platform
    7) Decide whether to write it yourself or hire someone
    8) Consider deeply the point-of-view of the user
    9) Test
    9a) Test some more
    9b) Keep testing
    10) Pricing and pricing options
    11) Business considerations that lead to success
    12) Financing options
    13) Legal issues: copyright and ownership
    14) The business type: sole propietor, corporation, etc.
    15) Insurance
    16) Software piracy
    17) When to stop programming and sell the product
    18) Writing a manual
    19) Packaging
    20) Going one step at a time

    Some of these things are treated more-or-less in the form of to-do items on a checklist, such as insurance. You won't find a list of the best software product insurers in the land in this book...it's just another one of those things you must deal with if you're actually going to make a business out of your brilliant software.

    Smolin's style has a light touch, particularly in the interviews. If you're somebody with little to no sense of humor, then this isn't the book for you. If you believe that business topics should be treated with seriousness and stodgy attention to every last stinking detail, then this isn't the book for you.

    Not that it's a laugh riot, mind you. Smolin slips in the persiflage at the right moments, I think, to keep you mindful of the fact that business can be fun and that a bit of humor helps you overcome the self-doubt that can come with the inevitable business setbacks.

    In "From Program to Product", Smolin treats the building of a software business, with all the attendant worries, obstacles, and triumphs, as if he's giving you advice as a very close friend who really wants you to do well. I truly wish that I'd had this book when I started my own software business. I'd still be in it ... and thriving.