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ePub The Habana Café Cookbook download

by Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings

ePub The Habana Café Cookbook download
Author:
Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings
ISBN13:
978-0813027371
ISBN:
0813027373
Language:
Publisher:
University Press of Florida; 1st edition (June 30, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Regional & International
ePub file:
1782 kb
Fb2 file:
1699 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw docx doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
887

The Habana Caf� Cookbook book.

The Habana Caf� Cookbook book.

Gonzalez-Hastings also provides a glossary explaining typical ethnic Cuban ingredients such as bijol, a condiment used to give rice a yellow color; naranja agria, the tart Seville orange often used to marinate meat and make mojo sauce; and malanga, a mild, nutty root that flavors soups and other sauces. In my Cuban family," she writes, "two things were always certain- food and good times.

Pot Pies: Forty Savory Suppers.

Reading this book is like sitting at the Gonzalez-Hastings kitchen table with a cup . Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings is head chef and owner of the Habana Cafe i. .

Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings is head chef and owner of the Habana Cafe in Gulfport, Florida. University Press of Florida.

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Biscuiteers Book of Iced Gifts by Biscuiteers -Olive Trees and Honey -The Gastroparesis Healing Diet: A Guided Program for Promoting Gastric Relief, Reducing Symptoms and Feeling Great by Tammy Chang -The Saffron Tales: Recipes from the Persian Kitchen by Yasmin Khan -Mug Crumbles: Ready in 3 Minutes in the Microwave by Christelle Huet-Gomez. Посмотреть все изображения.

Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings. Books by Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings. The Habana Café Cookbook. by Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings.

Culinary wizard and cafe owner Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings offers this extravagance of Cuban cooking as a.

Culinary wizard and cafe owner Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings offers this extravagance of Cuban cooking as a celebration of her heritage. Many of the recipes were passed down to her from her mother and aunts; others are "nuevo Latino cuisine"-a fusion of traditional Cuban foods with modern dishes. Gonzalez-Hastings also provides a glossary explaining typical ethnic Cuban ingredients such as bijol, a condiment used to give rice a yellow color; naranja agria, the tart Seville orange often used to marinate meat and make mojo sauce; and malanga, a mild, nutty root that flavors soups and other sauces.

"Best Cuban Food"--Beach Life, 1998"Best Cuban Food in Tampa Bay Area"--Tampa Bay Magazine, 1999-2003

"Reading this book is like sitting at the Gonzalez-Hastings kitchen table with a cup of espresso, exchanging favorite Cuban recipes with your best friend."--Pat Baldwin, retired food editor, St. Petersburg Times

The Habana Cafe's list of "Bests" began in 1997, soon after the Cuban family restaurant opened its doors on Florida's Gulf Coast and served its first steaming platters of homemade picadillo, arroz con pollo, and lechon asado--a mouth-watering dish of roasted pork seasoned with fresh garlic, oregano, white wine, and bay leaves and topped with grilled onions.

Culinary wizard and cafe owner Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings offers this extravagance of Cuban cooking as a celebration of her heritage. Many of the recipes were passed down to her from her mother and aunts; others are "nuevo Latino cuisine"--a fusion of traditional Cuban foods with modern dishes. Cuban food and preparation always has been varied, she says, flavored by the ancestry of the island, with contributions from Spanish conquistadors, African slaves, Asian laborers, and Indian natives.

Of course, she also includes Habana Cafe's standard sides of rice, black beans, and glazed golden-brown plantains. Customer favorites are all represented here in easy-to-follow recipes and colorful photographs--from appetizers and soups, seafood and vegetarian entrees, to classics (Cuban sandwiches and flan) and beverages (mojitos, sangria, cafe con leche, Cuba libre). Gonzalez-Hastings also provides a glossary explaining typical ethnic Cuban ingredients such as bijol, a condiment used to give rice a yellow color; naranja agria, the tart Seville orange often used to marinate meat and make mojo sauce; and malanga, a mild, nutty root that flavors soups and other sauces.

"In my Cuban family," she writes, "two things were always certain-- food and good times." Gonzalez-Hastings shares family stories and photographs of life in pre-Castro Cuba, re-creating the days when Havana was a dining mecca, Ernest Hemingway frequented La Floridita restaurant, and the island gave birth to the daiquiri.

Josefa Gonzalez-Hastings is head chef and owner of the Habana Cafe in Gulfport, Florida.

  • I loved eating at this restaurant and I've only been once. The food was great and I had the best cafe con leche I've ever tasted. I asked staff how it was made and they told me the secret was the condensed milk instead of regular milk. I've also made the ropa veija and pulled pork recipes. The recipes are easy to follow.

  • My husband is from Habana Cuba and I've tried other recipe's from different books. He says that I was spot on this time thanks to this cook book.

  • Precious fell in love with Cuban food many years ago. Her favorite restaurants are on Calle Ocho, and there is another restaurant on St Pete Beach that Precious loves. She calls it a "hole-in-the-wall". One day we went to that restaurant on St Pete Beach, but they changed their hours. They don't open until 5 p.m. now so we were in a bit of a pickle. Thanks to google and GPS we located another Cuban place not too far away. We went in and sat down. The place mat mentions this book, and I asked the waitress if I could see it. They maintain a copy at the restaurant for customers to flip through. They also have autographed copies for purchase.

    The author is from Cuba, but she is married to an American accountant, and her restaurant is located in an American neighborhood. There are few Cubans in the area. They have french fries on their menu, not tostones. They don't have rice and beans. Even the waitresses don't speak Spanish. We thought that was funny. So basically what I'm saying is that the author is very familiar with American tastes, and some of her recipes are Americanized. The food was good so we got the book.

    We've tried a few recipes so far. One is the flan. Where we live you have to drive 50 miles to get good flan, and one of the first recipes we tried was the flan recipe. There are actually two. One is the standard flan. The other is the author's own flan recipe with a little twist, and people seem to like the author's flan recipe more than the traditional flan. And what's really interesting is that I made it. ME! I made the flan. I got the ingredients. I read the instructions. I made the flan. I'm a moron. So what I'm saying is that this book is not overly complicated. I just can't wait to try more recipes.

    Another thing about the book are the anecdotes. She talks about her life in Cuba. She talks about her life as a Cuban American in the US. She has some pictures of herself and her lovely family. Some of the anecdotes are funny. Her restaurant is called "Habana Cafe". In the US we spell is with a "v" "Havana". One customer came to her restaurant trying to convince her that she spelled it wrong. It's a very funny anecdote.

  • I bought what I thought was a new book. It arrived with one of the corners of the book cover bent and gray smudges across the top of the cover. It was clearly USED but sold as new. I will now have to go to the trouble returning it. Unfortunately my order was time sensitive.