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ePub The Alice B. Toklas cook book download

by Alice B. Toklas

ePub The Alice B. Toklas cook book download
Author:
Alice B. Toklas
ISBN13:
978-0946189557
ISBN:
0946189552
Language:
Publisher:
Brilliance Books; New edition edition (1983)
Category:
Subcategory:
Regional & International
ePub file:
1291 kb
Fb2 file:
1391 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt mobi rtf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
376

I truly enjoyed reading The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book

I truly enjoyed reading The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. There are people on the move, people bringing their cultures, foods, ways of cooking to the table. it's a travelogue, a time capsule, a food history book. Also included in the book is a description of Ms. Toklas' garden in Bilignin, where she and Gertrude Stein summered for 14 years.

The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book, first published in 1954, is one of the bestselling cookbooks of all time

The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book, first published in 1954, is one of the bestselling cookbooks of all time. Alice B. Toklas, writer Gertrude Stein's life partner, wrote the book to make up for her unwillingness at the time to write her memoirs, in deference to Stein's 1933 book, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. This work is as much of an autobiography as it is a cookbook, in that it contains as many personal recollections as it does recipes. Toklas Cookbook book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Alice B. Toklas Cookbook as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Toklas Cook Book is one of the bestselling cookbooks of all time

The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book is one of the bestselling cookbooks of all time. The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book" is one of the bestselling cookbooks of all time. Written by writer Gertrude Stein's life partner, Alice B. Toklas wrote this book as a favor to Random House to make up for her unwillingness at the time to write her memoirs, in deference to Stein's 1933 book about her, "The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas".

She was one of those admirable bonnes in other words excellent maids of all work, good cooks thoroughly occupied with the welfare of their employers and of themselves, firmly convinced that everything purchasable was far too dear. Oh but it is dear, was her answer to any question. She wasted nothing and carried on the household at the regular rate of eight francs a day. She even wanted to include guests at that price, it was her pride, but of course that was difficult since she for the honour of her house as well as to satisfy her employers always had to give every one enough to eat.

Vintage 1950s American Mid-Century Modern Books. Excellent copy of Alice B. Toklas Cookbook published in America by Harper & Brothers, NY in 1954. Original dust cover intact. Small hole on the front cover and some wear to edges.

Alice Babette Toklas was an American writer. The most famous recipe is for hashish fudge, contributed by her artist friend Brion Gysin. A second cookbook, Aromas and Flavors of Past and Present (1958), was assembled by Poppy Cannon, who altered it for American tastes. Toklas disapproved of the changes and said that she would never use it herself. In What Is Remembered (1963), she recalled her early days in San Francisco and Seattle and her life in Paris.

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For the evening, Alice B. Toklas was Daniel Isengart, 48, a former cabaret singer and a personal chef. His book provides a blueprint for kindling this love flame of dough-mysticity in your own home. It includes recipes adapted from Ms. Toklas, as well as dozens of his own honed while singing for supper-club audiences while working as a caterer for demanding socialites in Manhattan and the Hamptons.

This edition of the legendary Alice b. Toklas Cook Book contains the full text of the previous editions with the bonus of recently unearthed recipes which have never before been published in book form. "Haschich Fudge" (brownie-like hashish fudge) recipe included.
  • I have a lot of food allergies, so I read cookbooks more for the entertainment value than for the useful knowledge. I truly enjoyed reading The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. Aside from the recipes, this is a truly fascinating memoir of life in France from World War I through World War II. It's an account of how people lived: What they ate and the cooks who cooked it. I re - learned that the French ate a lot of seafood. And remembered that just about all of a butchered animal was eaten in one form of another. The food choices that were available far exceed our choices at the supermarket. Mutton, wild boar, pigeon, rabbit, duck...as well as shellfish and fresh water and saltwater fishes. This is a "keeper" for me, because it's field guide to the history of culinary France.

    The profiles of their hired help also was, well, these were real people. Some of them were from other regions: Austria, Indo - China, Swiss, and the Basque region. Any one of these people would have a story to tell in their own right. But it's evident that the French were never just French. There are people on the move, people bringing their cultures, foods, ways of cooking to the table. I enjoyed this book...it's a travelogue, a time capsule, a food history book.

    Also included in the book is a description of Ms. Toklas' garden in Bilignin, where she and Gertrude Stein summered for 14 years. It's a great account of the fruits and vegetables that she grew.

    I have the 1984 edition. The recipes have been Americanized, so ingredients are given by volume, not by weight, and oven temperatures are in degrees Fahrenheit. (350, 400, etc.) The recipes are doable. There's a small cake recipe called Visitandines that I want to try. (It's curious for a cake because there's no sugar in it..I searched for other recipes and most have sugar. Is it an error that never got corrected, or is it authentic? Hard to tell).

    I really liked this book. It's a great read on many levels.

  • The recipes are quite suspect--I do not, for one second, believe that you could combine the ingredients Ms. Toklas recommends and, applying the techniques she describes, produce anything edible--I have cooked for a living, and can assure you it is quite unlikely that most of the recipes are on the level. Nevertheless, the book is a treasure, and I refer to it quite often, simply for her eccentric wit, and her enchanting stories of adventures with Ms. Stein and the Lost Generation. Not only is there chic and glamour, but quiet French village life during the Nazi occupation, oozes off the pages in lavender, moonlight and rosy nostalgia. I visited their adjoining plots at Pere Lachaise in Paris--remarkably, Alice's information is inscribed on the back of Stein's grey granite monument, and Alice's space, next to the crushed white marble covering Gertrude, does not even have grass growing over it. I love this book and it's brilliant author.

  • The history about the life and the guests who were served these recipes is almost more fascinating that Alice and her lover Gloria Stein. This book captures the kind of people who went to Paris and how they lived during the Twenties. The recipes are fascinating and will make you into a gourmet chef, yourself!

  • The recipes are really a sidenote to the reminiscences in this memoir, but many of the reminiscences are about food so "culinary memoir" seems an accurate description. Apparently Gertrude Stein enjoyed eating very well, and it was Alice B. Toklas who made sure that she did. When Gertrude and Alice entertained, Alice planned the menus and oversaw the kitchen staff (there is much discussion of difficulties with staff). When they visited literary and artistic greats, Gertrude was in the parlor discussing their art and Alice was in the kitchen discussing food with their wives or cooks. When they traveled, Alice made sure in advance that the meals would be to Gertrude's satisfaction. So Alice's recollections of Gertrude Stein's lecture tour in the U.S. in 1934-35, for instance, are almost completely about food and the meals they had. That said, there were plenty of fascinating people sharing those meals and we know enough about most of them that it's actually rather refreshing to have her comments on their food tastes instead of the more expected antecdotes.
    This is, however, more than a memoir: there are a lot of recipes and they are more accessible than I had anticipated. Some of them, for sure, are not suitable for a modern kitchen without staff. But many can be adapted quite easily. And the infamous marijuana brownies? It's actually a hashish fudge, submitted by an artist friend living in Morocco and in the Mideastern manner contains no chocolate. The introduction he gives to the recipe is one of the cleverest parts of the book, suggesting the fudge to enliven meetings of the DAR and commenting that the ingredients (he gives the Latin botanical name for the hashish) may be difficult to find in the U.S. but are quite common in the window boxes of Greenwich Village!
    This book is a wonderful addition to any library; when I gave it as a birthday gift recently it became the center of conversation for the rest of the evening.

  • Not just a cook book; it's full of wonderful short vignettes, experiences from the life of Gertrude Stein & Alice, the visits of artists and writers and what was served. Many of the recipes include spirits so I assume there were many parties. It's a fun read and well written allowing you to enter into the life and times from a very interesting age, plus the dishes sound delicious. Can't wait to serve them along with a story of how they came about.