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ePub Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto download

by Marc Vetri

ePub Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto download
Author:
Marc Vetri
ISBN13:
978-1607746072
ISBN:
1607746077
Language:
Publisher:
Ten Speed Press (March 17, 2015)
Category:
Subcategory:
Regional & International
ePub file:
1432 kb
Fb2 file:
1389 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr lit lrf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
444

Mastering Pasta is nothing short of the single most important book on handmade pasta I have ever read . When it comes to pasta I have never had any better than those that come from the hands of Marc Vetri-and that includes dozens of trips to Italy

Mastering Pasta is nothing short of the single most important book on handmade pasta I have ever read and I am maybe just a little jealous about i. .In any case, you will be a better cook and live a much happier life just by holding this book in your hands, let alone learning these simple and delicious recipes. When it comes to pasta I have never had any better than those that come from the hands of Marc Vetri-and that includes dozens of trips to Italy. I have said it for years that if there is one chef that could cook my last meal it would be Marc, and although I adore all his food, I think I would ask for ten courses of pasta because it is just that transcendent.

Mastering Pasta book. Encyclopedic book covering pasta, gnocchi, and risotto; with emphasis on pasta. Award-winning chef Marc Vetri wanted to write his first book about.

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Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto, - - Award-winning chef Marc Vetri wanted to write his first book about pasta.

Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto, - - Award-winning chef Marc Vetri wanted to write his first book about pasta. He also shows you how to make light-as-ai. com/y3lvxqdb Same great deal with amazing new steals! We have added thousands of books to our CLEARANCE SALE! Go check it out and see what great deals you can find! Food.

Электронная книга "Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto ", Marc Vetri, David Joachim

Электронная книга "Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto ", Marc Vetri, David Joachim. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto " для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Risotto is not made with flour like pasta and gnocchi. Dokfintong, March 19, 2015.

Mastering Pasta is nothing short of the single most important book on handmade pasta I have ever read and I am maybe just a little jealous about i. - Mario Batali, chef, restaurateur, and author "In my mind, Marc Vetri is one of the best pasta chefs on the planet. This is the pasta bible, written in the most beautiful way. Everyone needs a copy of this book on their shelf.

The book is filled with illustrations of pasta techniques and recipes. Vetri’s personal stories of travel and culinary discovery in Italy appear alongside his easy-to-follow, detailed explanations of how to make and enjoy fresh handmade pasta.

Award-winning chef Marc Vetri wanted to write his first book about pasta. Vetri's personal stories of travel and culinary discovery in Italy appear alongside his easy-to-follow, detailed explanations of how to make and enjoy fresh handmade pasta

Award-winning chef Marc Vetri wanted to write his first book about pasta. Instead, he wrote two other acclaimed cookbooks and continued researching pasta for ten more years. Now, the respected master of Italian cuisine finally shares his vast knowledge of pasta, gnocchi, and risotto in this inspiring, informative primer featuring expert tips and techniques, and more than 100 recipes. Vetri’s personal stories of travel and culinary discovery in Italy appear alongside his easy-to-follow, detailed explanations of how to make and enjoy fresh handmade pasta. Whether you’re a home cook or a professional, you’ll learn how to make more than thirty different types of pasta dough, from versatile egg yolk dough, to extruded semolina dough, to a variety of flavored pastas—and form them into shapes both familiar and unique. In dishes ranging from classic to innovative, Vetri shares his coveted recipes for stuffed pastas, baked pastas, and pasta sauces. He also shows you how to make light-as-air gnocchi and the perfect dish of risotto.  Loaded with useful information, including the best way to cook and sauce pasta, suggestions for substituting pasta shapes, and advance preparation and storage notes, Mastering Pasta offers you all of the wisdom of a pro. For cooks who want to take their knowledge to the next level, Vetri delves deep into the science of various types of flour to explain pasta’s uniquely satisfying texture and how to craft the very best pasta by hand or with a machine. Mastering Pasta is the definitive work on the subject and the only book you will ever need to serve outstanding pasta dishes in your own kitchen.
  • Mark Vetri is a talented professional chef. I am an advanced home cook. But when Mario Batali opined that this was 'the single most important book on handmade pasta I have ever read' and Jamie Oliver concluded 'Everyone needs a copy of this book on their shelves', I made the purchase. Okay...I've been making pasta at home for thirty years, I've attended a pasta class in Italy and I have owned and used 'Beard on Pasta' and 'The Essentials of Italian Cuisine' by Marcella Hazan for years. I am motivated to learn about pasta. But...what I expected from the promo for this book and what I found between the covers was disappointing. Bottom line: this book is a chef speaking to chefs. The fine first chapters on flours and making fresh and dried pasta dough will serve all-comers well, whether you are a beginner or are advanced. Unfortunately, that beginning gives way to a set of recipes that would challenge the home cook's pantry: 'Talleggio (that's a cheese) Ravioli with Radicchio, Honey and Walnuts,' 'Pea Agnolotti with Lardo,' 'Fig and Onion Caramella with Gorgonzola Fonduta...' Doppio Ravioli with Lamb and Polenta takes many steps and a good bit of time to prepare--assuming you have lamb and polenta on hand. Other enticing recipes call for foie gras terrine, octopus, scorpion fish, morel mushrooms, peekytoe crab--you get the idea. For sure, the book has beautiful pictures, is written intelligently and can provide 'inspiration'...but my inspiration was to find a high-end Italian restaurant and make a reservation!

    So...does this book 'reinvent the wheel' as far as most of us are concerned? Purists may cringe when James Beard--responding to what his reader's pantries would have on hand, says 'all-purpose flour' works best in America. I order a well-known Italian-milled Doppio Zero by mail order...but Beard is not wrong. I began by using unbleached all-purpose flour in my noodles. (He also includes recipes using pasta flour blends of white and whole wheat, buckwheat...even yeasted noodles courtesy of Barbra Kafka. Here is also where I learned about gnocchi. But, maybe you want a recipe for Kreplach. Beard has it. Marcella offers a 115 page section devoted to pasta and sauces in 'Essentials': she is concise about explaining the use of doppio zero, semolina and other flours before also saying that she prefers to use unbleached all purpose flour for making pasta in America...even if she has other options. She provides fine instruction on mixing, rolling and shaping dough into pasta forms. She speaks to the importance of bronze dies on extruding machines, just as Chef Vetri does. Her sauces include the time-honoured, lip-smacking classics--and that makes all the difference in usability at home. These books will better serve beginning and advanced home chefs. But maybe readers are looking for recipes on the somewhat unrelated subject of risotto? Marcella's 17 pages of recipes will do for most of us. Both of these books would 'push Mr. Vetri's book off the shelf' in home kitchens...which is some different than concluding that everyone needs to have this book on their shelf.

  • Marc Vetri is one of America’s best Italian chefs, and the Philly native’s latest book is a technique-driven walk through the process of making all kinds of pasta and gnocchi. Even though Vetri’s a chef and many of his recipes are derived from his restaurants, the book is firmly grounded as an instructional guide for the home cook. Mastering Pasta is a beautiful book, heavy on photos of the actual making of the shapes, which is key. I especially like the decision to show that homemade pasta is by nature a bit erratic: Not every strand of hand-cut tagliatelle will be the same width, and there will be little creases where you’d folded the dough over. Vetri’s recipes can get a bit esoteric, but he’s very good about offering alternatives if you can’t find sweetbreads or fresh porcini or snails.

    My main beef with the book is Vetri’s basic dough. His batch is 395 grams, about 2 1/2 cups of various flours, moistened with 9 egg yolks, plus some water and olive oil. Sorry, but I can't see blasting through a whole carton of eggs for a batch of pasta that will serve 4 or 5 people. I mean I understand why Vetri does this: He runs a restaurant. He’s trying to make a plate of pasta a special thing on a menu in a lovely restaurant. And his dough is indeed wonderful. But it’s just too spendy for a Wednesday night. And, given that you can whip up a basic batch of pasta in an hour, it’s not crazy to think that some cooks might want to make pasta regularly, and not for special occasions. My advice: For day-to-day pasta making, use the Italian standard of 1 whole egg for every 100 grams of flour and you’ll be fine.

    That said, I love this book. Vetri’s flavors and originality are remarkable. Hell, he’s even created a new pasta shape called “dove pasta,” which looks a bit like the eagle pattern you see in Southwest Indian weaving. I’ll definitely be making that. His technical sections are my favorite part of the book, and are useful no matter what you put on your pasta. His section on wheat is fascinating. What wheat you use actually matters, and they tell you why. Vetri shows you pasta shapes you’ve never seen before, combined with flavors you hadn’t thought of.

    Bottom line: Buy this book if you’ve made pasta at least a few times before, and want to drill down deeply into the subject. Vetri is a master and it shows, and his recipes, instruction and flavors are top notch.

  • This book is Heaven. Such great and thorough education on flour, dough and the process of pasta making. My one and only complaint is that a lot of the recipes call for ingredients that aren't easily located in your pantry or your local grocery store. I love Marc Vetri: he is truly a Master, but when it comes to writing a cookbook for non-chefs, it's important to keep that in mind. I like Octopus and will eat it in a restaurant but I really don't know what to do with it if it was an ingredient in my refrigerator. The thing is, it's not just one recipe or I wouldn't bother to mention it. For some chefs in regions where certain ingredients are readily available (big cities) and who cook with less mainstream items this won't be a problem. The recipes are relatively easy to prepare.
    I am still giving it 5 stars because it's a wonderful book, that is lovingly written and simply gorgeous.