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ePub Smart Kids, Bad Schools: 38 Ways to Save America's Future download

by Brian Crosby

ePub Smart Kids, Bad Schools: 38 Ways to Save America's Future download
Author:
Brian Crosby
ISBN13:
978-0312372583
ISBN:
0312372582
Language:
Publisher:
Thomas Dunne Books; First Edition: August 2008 edition (July 22, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Schools & Teaching
ePub file:
1857 kb
Fb2 file:
1794 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr lrf rtf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
762

Smart Kids, Bad Schools book. Crosby offers 38 ideas to save America’s future and his proposed remedies are revolutionary

Smart Kids, Bad Schools book. Smart Kids, Bad Schools: 38 Ways to Save America's Future. Crosby offers 38 ideas to save America’s future and his proposed remedies are revolutionary. He recommends bold measures, such as lengthening the school day and school year, forcing parents to volunteer at schools, abolishing homework, outlawing teachers unions, and cutting special education funding.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by CarriC on November 17, 2010.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian .

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school English teacher to offer a candid appraisal of why our schools are failing and what we must do to save them. Crosby offers 38 ideas to save America's future and his proposed remedies are revolutionary. The result is a book that is likely to inflame passions on all sides of the political spectrum, and, in the process, introduce new ideas to a debate that is in dire need of them.

Crosby offers 38 ideas to save America's future and his proposed remedies are revolutionary

Crosby offers 38 ideas to save America's future and his proposed remedies are revolutionary. In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school English teacher to offer a candid appraisal of why our schools are failing and what we must do to save them.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school . Crosby's no-holds-barred critique of the broken education system leaves no stone unturned: he is unapologetic and uncompromising in his exposé of how teachers, administrators, unions, and parents all play a part in this national tragedy.

Brian Crosby’s book, Smart Kids, Bad Schools: Thirty-eight Ways to Save America’s Future, almost has it nailed. What Mr. Crosby does not know is that as a blind student in a public school, there is a lot of drawback. I won’t go into how the sighted and able bodied children should be taught, how the teachers should be paid or the way a school should be restructured. Mr. Crosby almost had it all, except for one thing. Cutting special education and Title I.

Brian Crosby is an American author, educator, and newspaper columnist. Crosby, Brian (2008). Smart Kids, Bad Schools: 38 Ways to Save America's Future, Thomas Dunne Books, 320 pages. He writes "The Crosby Chronicles" blog for the Glendale News-Press. He is a national board-certified teacher and has taught high school English for over 26 years. As of 2014, he is the co-chair of the English Department at Herbert Hoover High School in Glendale, California. He has written two books about teaching and. the educational system.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws . Finally a book about fixing America's Schools that anybody can read.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school English teacher to offer a candid appraisal o. . Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Brian Crosby has written a fast-paced, entertaining book that presents a vision on how America needs to makeover its public schools. Smart Kids Bad Schools is full of clever ideas that everyone should seriously consider implementing. Plus, he is an actual school teacher with 20 years' experience so he knows what he is talking about.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school English teacher . Smart Kids, Bad Schools. 38 Ways to Save America's Future.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school English teacher to offer a candid appra. St. Martin's Griffin.

In Smart Kids, Bad Schools, award-winning author and educator Brian Crosby draws on his twenty years as a high school English teacher to offer a candid appraisal of why our schools are failing and what we must do to save them. Crosby’s no-holds-barred critique of the broken education system leaves no stone unturned: he is unapologetic and uncompromising in his exposé of how teachers, administrators, unions, and parents all play a part in this national tragedy.

Crosby offers 38 ideas to save America’s future and his proposed remedies are revolutionary. He recommends bold measures, such as lengthening the school day and school year, forcing parents to volunteer at schools, abolishing homework, outlawing teachers unions, and cutting special education funding. The result is a book that is likely to inflame passions on all sides of the political spectrum, and, in the process, introduce new ideas to a debate that is in dire need of them.

  • I find myself very conflicted about this book. On one hand I am grateful that there are dedicated and provocative teachers like Brian Crosby. I am also indebted to him for describing so many of the flaws in our school "system". However, I am frustrated by the internal inconsistancy of some of his thinking. For example, on page 93 he seems to find it unreasonable that $1.9 -$5.3 billion is spent annually on evaluating the effectiveness of a $500 billion effort to educate our children. Personally, I don't find it unreasonable to allocate 1% on evaluation of effectiveness of almost any system. Of course evaluation of any system should be based on its purpose and objectives. Here Mr. Crosby disappoints me completely. He devotes about half a page (Page 62) to a rather incomplete list of rhetorical questions about the goal of public education, but he does not display an appreciation of the complexity and the fundamental significance of the issue. I hope he grapples with that in his next book.

  • I felt Mr. Crosby had visited our school. Such insight into a major problem that is often blamed on everything but the real culprit. Easy read and informative.

  • The author had many interesting ideas, however the chapter on special education and title funding dumbfounded me. He has obviously not had the experience of being a parent of a disabled child, where every day it is a struggle if the special needs aren't addressed at school. There are probably many students who are qualified as special education students despite not having a disability, but what about those who do actually have a disability and will not make progress without specialized instruction and modifications? Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. It's unfortunate that many school officials already treat parents of disabled students with hostility because the student is viewed as a burden, and Mr. Crosby is just making the situation worse by stereotyping these students and parents as leeching the system. It's ridiculous to suggest that parents pay for the cost of educating students with disabilities. Would we tell cancer patients to pay for their own treatment because they are too big of a burden on the healthcare system? Most parents, unlike the examples in the book, do not try to take advantage of the system and are not asking for extravagant services or favors. Most disabled students are lucky if they get 20 minutes per day of services by a special education teacher. He says that gifted students get the short end of the stick, which is also true. But he thinks gifted students should receive more funding, and disabled students should receive less? How about if all students get what they need, and it's funded appropriately. My child is both highly gifted and physically disabled, and if I had to choose which is most important to address, it's the disability. Because the giftedness means nothing at all if he is unable to function or learn because of the disability. There are many children who are outliers at one extreme or the other and they will be more expensive to teach than the average students who fit into the mold. It's ludicrous to think that spending should be the same for all students, but I'm not sure if that's even the argument he tried to make because he kept contradicting himself.

  • It's an interesting book, but not well grounded in actual factual research. It's off the cuff from the streets preaching to the choir. I don't have time for that. While I appreciate his contribution, I could have better spent a Sunday afternoon.
    It's a quick and easy read. I'm not against many ideas,... but there needs to be a stronger push to advocate- what has he done to change

  • Mr. Crosby's book is a fairly quick read and many of his ideas for improving government-run schools are eminently sensible. These include: making schools' physical appearances and policies less like prisons; larger class sizes with higher quality teachers in high school classes; K-8 schools rather than separate middle schools; a ban on junk food/beverage sales; daily PE and a strong arts program; high-quality vocational education for non-college bound students; merit pay for teachers; eliminating tenure; ending social promotion; bringing back the teaching of basic civility, personal responsibility, respect for and consideration of others, and other virtues; more rigorous classes for gifted students; more field trips; incorporating community service; empowering teachers to actually do their jobs instead of being micromanaged by administrators and bureaucrats; less standardized testing; improving teacher preparation programs at the nation's colleges of education; having a career ladder for teachers; better fiscal management so that schools get more bang for their educational buck; requiring parental involvement; expelling chronically disruptive students; ending frivolous lawsuits by parents; and placing caps on out-of-control special education spending.

    A few of his arguments I found unconvincing. I do not share his enthusiasm for a year-round calendar, a longer school day, and full-day kindergarten for all students. These may be appropriate for some children, but for others so much time spent in an institutionalized setting may actually be detrimental. I also disagree with his ideas for moving teachers rather than students from classroom to classroom; having a M-Th schedule for teachers with every single Friday devoted to professional development; and his bashing of private schools & homeschooling and his paternalistic attitude that parents should automatically defer to the teacher's "authority" and "expertise" without question.

    Overall, however, I highly recommend "Smart Kids, Bad Schools" to anyone interested in improving the U.S. K-12 education system.