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ePub Assessment for Educational Leaders download

by W. James Popham

ePub Assessment for Educational Leaders download
Author:
W. James Popham
ISBN13:
978-0205424009
ISBN:
0205424007
Language:
Publisher:
Pearson (August 7, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Schools & Teaching
ePub file:
1318 kb
Fb2 file:
1690 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt azw lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
233

James Popham has spent the bulk of his educational career as a teacher

James Popham has spent the bulk of his educational career as a teacher. His first teaching assignment, for example, was in a small eastern Oregon high school where he taught English and social studies while serving as yearbook advisor, class sponsor, and unpaid tennis coach. 2005) and Assessment for Educational Leaders (2006), Allyn & Bacon; The Truth About Testing: An Educator’s Call to Action (2001) and Test Better, Teach Better: the Instructional Role of Assessment (2003), ASCD; America’s Failing Schools: How Parents and Teachers Can Cope with No Child Left Behind (2005) and Mastering Assessment: A Self-Service System for Educators (2006), RoutledgeFalmer.

James Popham, professor emeritus at University of California Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, has spent the bulk of his educational career as a teacher. 2010) and Assessment for Educational Leaders (2006), Allyn & Bacon; The Truth About Testing (2001), Test Better, Teach Better (2003), Transformative Assessment (2008) and Instruction that Measures Up (2009) ASCD; America’s Failing Schools (2005) and Mastering Assessment (2006), Routledge; and Unlearned Lessons (2009) Harvard Education Press. He encourages purchase of these books because he regards their semi-annual royalties as psychologically reassuring.

W His most recent books are Classroom Assessment: What Teachers Need to. .

James Popham has spent the bulk of his educational career as a teacher. His most recent books are Classroom Assessment: What Teachers Need to Know, 4th Ed. (2005) and Assessment for Educational Leaders (2006), Allyn & Bacon; The Truth About Testing: An Educator's Call to Action (2001) and Test Better, Teach Better: the Instructional Role of Assessment (2003), ASCD; America's "Failing" Schools: How Parents and Teachers Can Cope with No Child Left Behind (2005) and Mastering Assessment: A Self-Service System for Educators (2006).

Assessment for Educational Leaders book.

The content of the text is unabashedly practical, addressed specifically to the assessment-related needs of today's school administrators. The real-world orientation of the book, based on the author's extensive and continuing work in the nation's public schools, makes the book attractive to those instructors who teach assessment.

W Popham is the author of more than 30 books, 200 journal articles .

James Popham is Emeritus Professor in the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. He has spent most of his career as a teacher, largely at UCLA, where for nearly 30 years he taught courses in instructional methods for prospective teachers and graduate-level courses in evaluation and measurement. 2014), Mastering Assessment (2011), and Assessment for Educational Leaders (2006), Pearson; Evaluating America's Teachers: Mission Possible?

A leading expert in educational assessment, W. James Popham discusses the key principles that educational leaders need to know . His most recent books are Classroom Assessment: What Teachers Need to Know, 6th Ed.

A leading expert in educational assessment, W. James Popham discusses the key principles that educational leaders need to know about educational assessment to do their work effectively.

In America's "Failing" Schools, W. James Popham provides parents and . James Popham provides parents and teachers explanations of No Child Left B.

Assessment for Educational LeadersW. Only if the educational leaders have experience in assessment will other educators believe in their assessment competence. J. Popham2006 Loree Korb Matt McLelland KelseaQuillin Cheryl Vogler. A Call for Comparisons in Competitive Contexts Three factors should always be applied to comparative data: Validity Reliability Absence of Bias Norm Referenced interpretations make sense out of tests and data Only if the educational leaders have experience in assessment will other educators believe in their assessment competence.

I am a huge fan of this book!" - -Michael Boyle, Loyola University, Chicago "Popham is a highly respected voice in the field of educational assessment. Over the years he has contributed tremendously to our understanding of the measurement issues that face educators. I have found Popham's text to be an excellent choice for my introductory course in classroom assessment.

Written specifically for school administrators and those preparing to be school administrators, this easy-to-read book contains only what's needed by leaders in today's assessment-dominated world of educational accountability. The content of the text is unabashedly practical, addressed specifically to the assessment-related needs of today's school administrators. The real-world orientation of the book, based on the author's extensive and continuing work in the nation's public schools, makes the book attractive to those instructors who teach assessment courses taken by prospective school administrators. Students (and in-service school administators) will recognize that this text is not loaded with dry, abstruse content about measurement and psychometric exotica. This book deals with the real-world measurement issues that today's educational leaders will most certainly encounter.

  • I can easily break this review up into three parts: the good, the bad, and the ugly. First, the good: Popham's writing style is accessible and as you read his prose, you feel like you're sitting down with him one-on-one, having a conversation. He does a great job in demystifying statistics and measurement issues, like reliability and validity.

    Now, the bad. Some of Popham's viewpoints are grossly out of date. The chapter on bias, for example, would feel at home in the 1970's. I don't know if this is because Popham is stuck in the past, or if he doesn't want to introduce the complex developments in the assessment of item/test bias to his neophyte readers. Whatever the cause, if principals think that they are up to date on bias after reading the chapter, they will be sorely mistaken.

    And, the ugly. Unbeknownst to the typical reader, Popham relies a lot on sources that either (a) want to abolish testing completely, or (b) want to put so many restraints on testing that it would be stopped for all practical purposes. At the end of almost every chapter he refers the reader to an anti-testing source, like Alfie Kohn, FairTest, CRESST, CSTEEP, and others. Never does he refer readers to the journal (and readable for the layman) "Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice," or the works of Gregory Cizek or Richard Phelps.

    Popham also frequently wants you to take what he says on faith. There are few references in this book--perhaps a result of not wanting to crowd it up or make it seem too technical. If this was his purpose, he has gone too far; for example, Popham says that test items aren't aligned with state standards, but gives no evidence or examples of this. In my state (Texas), every item is aligned with a state standard--and aligned quite well. He also says that states have too many curriculum "benchmarks" or "standards," but, again, doesn't give an example of a state that does.

    He also (intentionally?) obfuscates issues, especially at the end of the book. He criticizes items, for example, for measuring a combination of teaching, inborn ability, and socioeconomic status. While this is true of standardized tests, it's also true of ANY measurement. When a ruler measures my height, it measures the final product of my genes and my experiences. To pretend that any measurement (physical or psychological) or a person can identify which parts of the behavior are "genetic" or "socioeconomic status" is silly. Similarly, Popham criticizes tests for trying to measure too many curricular aims and says that aims should be clearly articulated. Fair enough, but articulating curricula is not the job of psychometricians--it's the job of state boards of education and legislatures.

    I shudder to think of the thousands of educational leaders who have had their entire psychometric education from Popham's book. I have yet to find a great book written for the non-expert, but this is among the worst.

  • This book covers a lot of material on educational assessment. Fortunately, the author displays a good sense of humor while explaining each topic, thus making the details easily digestible and easier to understand with a chuckle here and there.

  • for a class

  • not the worst book for a measurement class

  • good just needed it for class

  • what I needed for school

  • Used for college.

  • though there are many books out there on this topic I would suggest that you take the time to read it. Found it very helpful.