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ePub Oil Windfalls: Blessing or Curse? (A World Bank Research Publication) download

by Alan Gelb

ePub Oil Windfalls: Blessing or Curse? (A World Bank Research Publication) download
Author:
Alan Gelb
ISBN13:
978-0195207743
ISBN:
0195207742
Language:
Publisher:
World Bank/Oxford University Press; 1 edition (October 1988)
Category:
Subcategory:
Engineering
ePub file:
1966 kb
Fb2 file:
1986 kb
Other formats:
txt docx lit mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
595

Presenting new data on how oil windfalls have been used by oil producing countries, this book blends institutional and political considerations with . by Alan Gelb (Author).

Presenting new data on how oil windfalls have been used by oil producing countries, this book blends institutional and political considerations with quantitative analysis.

book by Alan H. Gelb.

Gunning, Jan Willem, 1991. Oil windfalls: Blessing or curse? : Alan Gelb and associates, (Oxford University Press, for the World Bank, New York, et. .1988) pp. 357," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 407-411, April. Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:35:y:1991:i:2:p:407-411. Cases of plagiarism in Economics.

Gelb concludes that much of the potential benefit of windfalls has been dissipated and explains why oil producers may actually end up worse off despite revenue gains.

118+ million publications. shed light on whether markets believe that being a G-SIB is good, a blessing, or bad, a. curse. Figures - uploaded by Stelios Markoulis. Interestingly, we find that each event corresponds to a different hypothesis; the first one is.

On the relationship of structural changes and economic growth in the world economy and Russia. Monetary Policy and Global Financial Crisis: Methodological Aspects and Lessons for Russia.

Hall, Robert and Chad I. Jones, 1999, ‘Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?’. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Oil Windfalls: Blessing or Curse? Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny. Washington, DC: World Bank and Stanford University Press.

Oil Windfalls: Blessing or Curse?. New York: Oxford University Press. Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny.

Presenting new data on how oil windfalls have been used by oil producing countries, this book blends institutional and political considerations with quantitative analysis, including model simulations. Proposing that countries need to look to their economic management and its attendant political factors rather than relying on natural resources for successful economic development. Gelb concludes that much of the potential benefit of windfalls has been dissipated and explains why oil producers may actually end up worse off despite revenue gains.