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ePub Biodegradable: Detergents and the Environment (Environmental History Series) download

by William McGucken

ePub Biodegradable: Detergents and the Environment (Environmental History Series) download
Author:
William McGucken
ISBN13:
978-0890964798
ISBN:
0890964793
Language:
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press; 1 edition (July 1, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Engineering
ePub file:
1900 kb
Fb2 file:
1142 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lit docx
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
597

Home Browse Books Book details, Biodegradable: Detergents and the Environment.

Home Browse Books Book details, Biodegradable: Detergents and the Environment. Biodegradable: Detergents and the Environment. The environmental movement of recent decades within the United States has been depicted by Samuel P. Hays as being rooted in vast social changes that followed World War II. According to Hays, the movement "differed markedly" from the conservation movement of the early twentieth century.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Biodegradable: Detergents and the Environment as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Detergent Biodegradation, Detergent pollution of rivers, lakes, etc, Synthetic detergents industry. College Station : Texas A&M University Press.

Biodegradable : Detergents and the Environment.

University Press, Environmental History Series 12, 1991). His background and impressive earlier forays into the history of science, technology and the environment, and the social aspects of science, provide fitting prelude to the current volume.

Lake Erie Rehabilitated: Controlling Cultural Eutrophication, 1960s-1990s. Akron: University of Akron Press, 2000. University Press, Environmental History Series 12, 1991).

This thought-provoking book tells a different version of American history than the one we are used to, where nature plays a. .

This thought-provoking book tells a different version of American history than the one we are used to, where nature plays a fundamental role in the events that shaped the nation. ―Institute for Global Environmental Strategies. This is surely among the most important works of environmental history published since the field was founded four or more decades ago. No book before it has so compellingly demonstrated the value of applying environmental perspectives to historical events that at first glance may seem to have little to do with 'nature' or 'the environment.

environmental problems primarily under the doctrinal headings of territorial sovereignty an. Habitat39 and the 1972 Paris Convention for the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural.

environmental problems primarily under the doctrinal headings of territorial sovereignty and. xiv The History and Origin of International Environmental Law. ‘internationally used spaces and resources’.

is an excellent and needed addition to the still remarkably small literature that explores the combined histories of Americans, automobiles, and the environment. belongs in the library of anyone interested in transportation, infrastructure, mobility, and land-use in twentieth-century America.

Bringing together leading environmental historians and world historians, this book offers an overview of global environmental history throughout this . TWO The Big Story: Human History, Energy Regimes, and the Environment.

Bringing together leading environmental historians and world historians, this book offers an overview of global environmental history throughout this remarkable 500-year period.

Environmental history is the study of human interaction with the natural world over time, emphasising the active role nature plays in influencing human affairs and vice versa. Environmental history emerged in the United States out of the environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s, and much of its impetus still stems from present-day global environmental concerns

Synthetic detergents rapidly replaced soap for most domestic cleaning purposes after World War II. Concurrently, great billows of foam began passing undegraded through sewage treatment plants into receiving waters, which were often sources for domestic water supplies. The detergent industry quickly learned that many surface-active agents—the active ingredients of synthetic detergents and the producers of foam—were not readily biodegradable. The most popular surface-active agent was alkyl benzene sulfonate (ABS). Industrialized societies had developed satisfactory sewage processes to treat domestic wastes, but even the most advanced treatment facilities proved incapable of degrading ABS.Biodegradable examines the development of synthetic detergents and the unanticipated pollution of surface waters and groundwaters by this new technology, as well as the social, political, and industrial responses that resulted in correction of the problem. Public and governmental pressure in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Federal Republic of Germany led to the international detergent industry’s finding a biodegradable substitute for ABS, namely, linear alkyl sulfonate (LAS). Its use from the mid-1960s solved the foaming pollution problem.The three countries responded to the problem very differently. West Germany almost immediately legislated that only those detergents that were more than eighty percent biodegradable could be sold. The U.S. government allowed the detergent industry to seek a solution while the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare monitored the industry’s progress. In the U.K. the government created committees and required industry to cooperate with them to find a solution. Biodegradable not only examines problems resulting from a new technology but also compares and contrasts different societies’ methods of dealing with these problems.