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ePub Seeds, Sex, and Civilization: How the Hidden Life of Plants Has Shaped Our World download

by Peter Thompson,Stephen Harris

ePub Seeds, Sex, and Civilization: How the Hidden Life of Plants Has Shaped Our World download
Author:
Peter Thompson,Stephen Harris
ISBN13:
978-0500251706
ISBN:
0500251703
Language:
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson (September 30, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Engineering
ePub file:
1579 kb
Fb2 file:
1126 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt txt rtf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
895

Seeds, Sex, and Civilization book

Seeds, Sex, and Civilization book. Here, Peter Thompson unfolds the absorbing histo Seeds have influenced evolution, and for millennia they have influenced and sometimes determined where and how we live. The book concludes with a chapter by Stephen Harris on current debates about genetically modified crops, seed conservation, and plant ownership in the contemporary world.

This book, which tells the story of human relationships with and dependence upon seeds, was written .

This book, which tells the story of human relationships with and dependence upon seeds, was written for a general audience, but is of equal relevance to the specialist audience of Food Security. The tenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP 10) biodiversity summit was held in Nagoya, Japan

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book by Stephen Harris. The history of civilization told through the story of man’s relation to and use of seeds.

In this absorbing history, Peter Thompson explores how mankind has gradually learned what seeds are, where they come from and their role in the survival of the productivity of crops and wildflowers. The book concludes with a chapter by Stephen Harris on current debates about genetically modified crops, seed conservation and plant ownership in the contemporary world.

By Peter Thompson Peter Thompson Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

What is indeed hidden, and is ably revealed by Thompson, is not the life of plants, but the history of how plants .

What is indeed hidden, and is ably revealed by Thompson, is not the life of plants, but the history of how plants taught us farming, genetics and ecology. In an engaging introduction, he explains that seeds are the basis of settled agriculture and hence the origins of cities and urban civilisation. Another hero of seed science feted by Thompson is Nikolai Vavilov, the Soviet geneticist who discovered the huge genetic diversity in local populations of crop plants around the world. This diversity is the source of new genes for traits such as pest and drought resistance that is the basis for breeding new crop varieties.

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. The history of civilization told through the story of man's relation to and use of seeds. Seeds, Sex, and Civilization.

Plant genetic resource conservation has become increasingly important as more plants have become threatened or. .Seeds, sex and civilization: how the hidden life of plants has shaped our world. Williams, Beryl and Epstein, Samuel.

Plant genetic resource conservation has become increasingly important as more plants have become threatened or rare.

Seeds, sex and civilization: how the hidden life of plants has shaped our world. Thompson, 2010 p192,193. Harlan, Jack Rodney 1995 The Living Fields: Our Agricultural Heritage, Cambridge University Press, 239-240. Thames and Hudson, 2010. Thompson, 2010 p191-193. Hymowitz, Ted. Professor Jack R. Harlan June 7, 1917 to August 26, 1998. php?title Jack Harlan&oldid 882377483".

The history of civilization told through the story of man’s relation to and use of seeds.

Seeds have influenced evolution, and for millennia they have influenced and sometimes determined where and how we live. This is an epic tale, given added enchantment by the fact that to most of us seeds mean little more than tiny objects in paper packets: who thinks first of rice, wheat, coffee, nuts, peas, beans, or olives? Here, Peter Thompson unfolds the absorbing history of how, after centuries of investigation, we finally discovered what seeds do and how they work. This is a scientific detective story with heroes and heroines following clues and finding answers. Thompson brings to life the eccentrics, explorers, amateurs, and highly dedicated professionals who have accumulated our knowledge. Some are well known, such as Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel; others, like the Russian geneticist Nikolai Vavilov, are less so. The seeds also have a story and appear to have personalities, ambitions, and “stratagems” of their own. The book concludes with a chapter by Stephen Harris on current debates about genetically modified crops, seed conservation, and plant ownership in the contemporary world. 42 color and 8 black-and-white illustrations